Music Is The Weapon, But Then Again, It Always Was

AT THE CORNER of 8th and Market in San Francisco, by a shuttered subway escalator outside a Burger King, an unusual soundtrack plays. A beige speaker, mounted atop a tall window, blasts Baroque harpsichord at deafening volumes. The music never stops. Night and day, Bach, Mozart, and Vivaldi rain down from Burger King rooftops onto empty streets.
.
Empty streets, however, are the target audience for this concert. The playlist has been selected to repel sidewalk listeners — specifically, the mid-Market homeless who once congregated outside the restaurant doors that served as a neighborhood hub for the indigent. Outside the BART escalator, an encampment of grocery carts, sleeping bags, and plastic tarmacs had evolved into a sidewalk shantytown attracting throngs of squatters and street denizens. “There used to be a mob that would hang out there,” remarked local resident David Allen, “and now there may be just one or two people.” When I passed the corner, the only sign of life I found was a trembling woman crouched on the pavement, head in hand, as classical harpsichord besieged her ears.

Welcome to the world of “weaponized classical music”, where homeless people, thugs, dirtbags, and “teens” are actively repelled through the high-volume application of music that they don’t happen to like. It’s a tactic that is well over thirty years old, having been started with “Mozart At The 7-Eleven” in British Columbia back in ’85. In any era but this one, people would hear about this and chuckle. In $THE_CURRENT_YEAR, however, we must respond with everything from academic papers to the increasingly-shopworn boilerplate accusations of bigotry and racism. In the process of doing so, however, we will lay ourselves out to the possibility of deconstructive evisceration. Allow me to wield the knife. As Pusha-T said a few weeks ago, it’s going to be a surgical summer.

With this in mind, I examine in this article a recent trend in destructive uses of music: the use of classical music in the government and business sector to repel and control teens—their activities and accompanying noise—in Australia, Britain, Canada, and the United States. In these countries, various authorities employ classical music as a crime deterrent in order to reduce hooliganism and ward off undesirables, including, in some cases, the homeless. This represents a new chapter in the mass culture wars—one in which the elite exploit classical music to banish sound they deem unacceptable, including in some cases popular music.

Lily Hirsch of Cleveland State University — wait a minute, there’s a Cleveland State University? — wrote a seventeen-page paper attacking this “destructive use of music” for the Journal Of Popular Music Studies. Google tells me that it has been cited no fewer than twenty-eight times. It’s the first serious result you get for “weaponized classical music.” Alas, Mrs. Hirsch buries the lede about four pages down:

Figures from January 2005 showed that with the installment of transmitted classical music robberies in British subways were down by 33 percent, assaults on staff by 25 percent, and vandalism of trains and stations by 37 percent

And you thought playing Bach to your baby bump would change the world for the better! Turns out that you can play it after the kids are born and it also helps. Are you struggling to see the drawbacks of a practice that both exposes people to decent music and reduces crime? Don’t worry, the effortlessly superior mandarins of the self-appointed media elite are here to help you. From the New Yorker, which is currently thrashing wildly in a St. Vitus’ dance of Trump Derangement Syndrome, yet still had world enough and time to publish this:

To Hirsch, it’s no coincidence that 7-Eleven perfected its technique of musical cleansing while American forces were experimenting with musical harassment. Both reflect a strategy of “deterrence through music,” capitalizing on rage against the unwanted. The spread of portable digital technology, from CDs to the iPod and on to smartphones, means that it is easier than ever to impose music on a space and turn the psychological screws. The logical next step might be a Spot­ify algorithm that can discover what combination of songs is most likely to drive a given subject insane.

RAGE AGAINST THE UNWANTED! UHHHHH! KILLING IN THE NAME OF! SOME OF THOSE WHO LIKE MOZART / ARE THE SAME WHO BURN CROSSES! UHHHHH!

A quick check through about a dozen essays on “weaponized classical music” shows that they all eventually reach an identical conclusion: playing classical music is a hateful attempt to “reclaim space” that is rightfully occupied by criminals, thugs, homeless people, “teens”, and the unwanted. The subtle orchestration behind their perfectly common opinions would put Radical-Chic Bernstein to shame, but it just goes to show that if you make people read from the same musical chart for sixteen-plus years of indoctrination it should be no surprise when they sing in perfect harmony at the ten-year reunion. Back to Hirsch, singing the soprano part:

music is used as a marker of space, signaling inclusion to some and exclusion to others. For teens on the whole unfamiliar with music associated with a different class, the choice is clear; take their activities elsewhere. No one has to speak or to understand the position of the other. Music replaces war and silences. But does this measure raise some of the same ethical concerns as the use of music for torture?

Marie Thompson, alto:

…the organization of such tactics… can be thought of as a low-intensity form of warfare… in which the music of the elite is deployed against the young, the poor, and the bored.

I could go on. I could also go on about the astounding racism, bigotry, and ignorance shown in nearly every single piece written on this topic — most notably, the tacit assumption that black people are 100% unable to appreciate classical music, presumably because they have a longer tendon in their calves or some other Jimmy-The-Greek-style generalization — but what’s the point? There’s no crimethink when liberal writers make racist or bigoted assumptions. Racism, like classical music, is something that can only be weaponized against the undesirables across the aisle.

Instead of cutting deeper into that, I would like to completely and utterly surrender the point made by every single social-justice warrior, every cat-lady graduate student, every nu-male open-mouth-smiling writer for every left-leaning publication out there. To them, I say: I agree. You win. Weaponized classical music is a violent assault against the lovely people who want nothing more than to shit on the streets, shoot up and leave dirty needles in the gutter, rob people as they come out of the 7-Eleven, or rape customers of their local Burger King. The idea that we should even consider putting up the mildest sonic barrier to this behavior makes us horrible, terrible, no-good people. It is the fate of Heritage Americans and decent people everywhere to suffer under the unceasing assault of the Left’s astounding array of shock troops, whether those troops take the form of violent homeless people or Antifa or BLM or whatever socially-approved uber-group happens to spring up out of the ground next.

Music in public spaces is a weapon. Classical music in public spaces is a knowing, forthright assault on robbers, assailants, vandals, rapists, and murderers. To this day, I shudder when I think of that poor homeless woman in the paragraph that opens this story, shuddering under the assault of the harpsichord. Lady, I feel your pain. That’s why Cristofori or whatever his name was invented the pianoforte. Did you know that they used to FORCIBLY MURDER BIRDS AND STEAL THEIR FEATHERS that were then used in harpsichords to PLUCK THE INTESTINES OF MURDERED ANIMALS? It is cruelty all the way down with these people. Can’t you just see John Malkovich in a powdered wig plotting to assault the homeless with music?

If you accept my surrender, and you accept the fundamental correctness of the people, tracts, and publications that criticize this weaponized classical music, then it is only logical and correct that you accept the next premise: that all music in a public space must be judged by the same standards. And if you accept that premise, then you must accept that the high-volume ubiquity of modern pop music must, logically, speaking, have the same power over its listeners that weaponized classical music does.

In other words, if weaponized classical music is bad because it upsets thugs and vandals (not to be confused with Thuggees and Vandals, two undoubtedly fine groups of people whose primary presence in history consists of their presence in colloquial English) then it must surely follow that weaponized pop, R&B, and rap is bad because it upsets everybody but thugs and vandals.

If you read this blog on a frequent basis, you know that I’m an omnivorous consumer of garbage pop, from Guns N’ Roses to Pusha-T. But I don’t think that this music necessarily deserves room in the public space. I don’t like walking into a store and hearing the latest incoherent mumble-crap or nu-metal or boy-band junk. Yet this “invasion of the public space” is omnipresent. It blares from cars, cascades from open-air headphones, attacks you from all sides courtesy of weather-proofed Bose speakers. If you go to an amusement park you will be pummeled by it. If you attend an art festival downtown you’ll be forced to hear it.

By my rough and ready calculation, “weaponized pop music” is approximately one hundred thousand times as common as “weaponized classical music”. But we are expected to shut up and listen. To lyrics that degrade women, dehumanize men, deliberately destroy public morality. It is the music of our times, and it is everywhere, and it is garbage. If you think it doesn’t affect people, you’re wrong. Young people take their cues from popular music. It teaches them morals. It shows them how to behave. It communicates the code of modern society in-between the Roland 808 beats or the shimmering synths.

Oh, and it’s aimed at children. How about the decision to put “Desmond Is Amazing” on a giant video wall on Times Square? Desmond, in case you don’t know, is a young boy about my son’s age whose parents are eagerly monetizing as the “award-winning LGBTQ activist, drag artist, model, fashion icon, and voguer in NYC.” At all times night and day, videos of Desmond in makeup and clothing meant to simulate what adult women wear play while a rap song about “feminine and fierce” plays.

If you have a young son, and he is hearing this music, then, as TLP says, it’s for him.

Nobody is up in arms about this. Nobody is clutching their pearls about the blizzard of sexual messages we send to children through our public music and culture. Nobody is willing to intimate that perhaps 10-year-old boys don’t really need to choose a gender or an LGBTQ identity any more than they need to start reading Chauteau Heartiste and day-gaming their female friends at summer daycare. That would be racist. If you want to have any part in modern society, and that includes a job outside the construction field, you need to eagerly embrace the sexualization of children by any means necessary. Can you believe that I have never, not once, sat down with my son to explore his potential gay or trans identity? Can you believe that we don’t talk about sex at all? And him at the advanced age of nine! Why, I might as well be hitting him with a belt for not cleaning out the sump pump correctly every night. Not to worry. Desmond’s media machine will do my parenting for me, and the schools will help that process along.

It’s totally cool to fill our own heads with garbage. It’s even better to fill the heads of our children with garbage. But the use of classical music to keep people from stabbing the customers after they take a nice steaming dump in front of your restaurant door? By the blood of the risen Christ — THAT is where we draw the line. It is not acceptable. It is violent, it is elitist, it is evil. As for the other stuff? Well, you know what they say…

If it ain’t Baroque…

don’t fix it.

72 Replies to “Music Is The Weapon, But Then Again, It Always Was”

    • Felis Concolor

      If the Left is upset with this mild form of nationalism, they’re really going to not like what happens when the ultras get going.

      Reply
    • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

      That’s what I said about the Frosty machine when I worked at Wendy’s!

      Sometimes it’s the activity that matters, not the result. Just ask anybody who was part of the WPA!

      Reply
      • -Nate

        My Mother’s last house in Framingham, Mass. was built in a poorly filled swamp, it had an automatic electric sump pump and the full basement never quite got dry enough to use apart from washer & dryer .

        Sump pumps are a part of low budget country living, I don’t miss it one bit .

        -Nate

        Reply
      • Hank chinaski

        I did a short stint at Wendy’s, making the upward move to a brand new BK down the street for a whole 15 cents more an hour. Feeding frozen beef waffle pucks into a conveyor belt beats flipping by a mile. Fewer grease burns too.

        Reply
          • Hank chinaski

            Unused cooked burger patties from the night before. Between the cooking and the sitting and drying out, most of the grease is gone.

          • -Nate

            Seriously Hank ? .

            I’ve worked in kitchens and the oil / grease _never_ dissipates .

            -Nate

          • hank chinaski

            I suppose after a few hours, enough congealed on the bottom of the pan to get below oil slick threshold levels. Or else they’ve come up with something creative in the 30 odd years since then.

  1. Tristan W Weary

    Sorry but His Eminence, Emperor Joseph II of Austria strongly disagrees with you on Mozart: “There are simply too many notes”

    Reply
  2. Scout_Number_4

    If the first four comments are any indication, this should be a good one. (rubs hands together in anticipation).

    Reply
  3. dejal

    35 years? How about Wagner – Apocalypse Now? Was it “She’ll be coming around the mountain when she comes.” in “Kellys Heros”?

    Both of those are just movies and maybe music wasn’t used like that in those wars, but these movies predate 1985. So, one way or another the thought about pissing of the enemy (and that’s what the groups you are trying to drive away are) goes back a few years before 85.

    Reply
    • Felis Concolor

      “The darkness of my world was all cleared away
      The flowers are blooming, it’s a beautiful day
      There’s a girl with a heart as big as the sky, she’s sunshine and I know why.”

      “All for the Love of Sunshine” by Hank Williams, Jr.

      After the rail yard was destroyed, they departed to the tune of “I’ve Been Working on the Railroad.”

      Reply
  4. Mopar4wd

    Ah the crazed left. The right gets white nationalist ‘s and the KKK, and most of the anti semites. The left gets college students and perpetual singles who rail against cultural appropriation and music in public spaces.

    Reply
  5. Rob

    See, this is why I visit RG daily. I was not aware of this Desmond thing. I predict that when he reaches adulthood, his psychological well-being will be somewhere between peak-Alec-Baldwin and the guy at the corner who argues loudly (and convincingly) with empty Big Mac wrappers.

    Reply
    • everybodyhatesscott

      I think you’re being optimistic. I’d guess a young death by drug addiction or suicide

      Reply
      • sabotenfighter

        The really fucked up part? You just know people would blame it on the LGBTBBQWTF unfriendliness of society, not the fact that the poor kid was Caulkinized by his parents, much like some of the kids of Stranger Things.

        Reply
  6. -Nate

    Jack I’m shocked ! .

    I bet you even allow John to choose his own music ! .

    I remember back in the 1980’s, hearing about some sort of noise generator that made a high pitched squealing noise, in audible except to young people…..

    I expected to see them in use everywhere but never heard of them again .

    For those who don’t live in the trenches where bums, druggies and worthless thieving young men are “normal” (? WTF ?), this discussion might seem academic but basic morality and good manners are important, I learned this from salt of the earth conservative types .

    -Nate
    (Who, BTW, likes R&B very much and is neither a criminal nor non white)

    Reply
    • sabotenfighter

      Those are still around. Emits a mosquito-like high pitch sound. I can still hear it, and its really annoying, but not enough to drive me away from my loitering.

      Reply
      • -Nate

        Thanx, I mentioned all this to my brother who asked for a link, he’ll prolly chime in here, I don’t think he likes the idea of shooing away loiterers .

        -Nate

        Reply
  7. tyates

    The amount of mental gymnastics you have to do as a liberal is just exhausting. I certainly couldn’t do it. White older Southerners are racist – except for all of the ones that ran for President on the Democratic ticket. Incentives don’t affect income or welfare, but they do when carbon or smoking is involved. Young upper-middle class college guys are rapists, but middle eastern “refugees” and lower income gang bangers aren’t criminals by default and shouldn’t be profiled. More guns = more violence, except in New England and especially when a Democrat is running for re-election in their hunting outfit. Sexism in movies is awful, but violence and drugs are just fine. Changing your sexual orientation is impossible and shouldn’t even be discussed, but changing your actual gender is not only possible but should be celebrated. It just goes on and on.

    Reply
  8. J Edwards

    Here I am thinking, like some silly peasant, that I’m only 37 and thoroughly enjoy classical music. Little did I know that I am actually, in secret quite obviously, a 65 year old millionaire. Even further, I have been an elderly rich white male since I was a teenager. From this day forth I will sit in my high seat of power and privilege and shat thoroughly upon the plebeians and their mush-mouth mumble-rap.

    Reply
    • jc

      Interesting indeed. I bet my mother, who raised me listening to Stravinsky, Bartok, de Falla, etc., etc. (the Rite of Spring is the soundtrack of my childhood), would be surprised to learn that when she thought she was a 30 something elementary school teacher and single mother, that she was actually an old rich white guy (she was definitely white, but not any of the other things).

      Apparently then, I have been an elderly rich guy since I was born.

      Reply
  9. John C.

    I can see why classical music is such a threat. It is by being something that is not the lower class and will never be. When the Islamists went after the Shah in Iran, they did not target pop music. They understood that the lower parts of society could relate to that type of music, even though foreign. Instead they went mockingly and hard against classical, as it was only being enjoyed by the upper class. The upper class was the enemy, and soon had to leave, quickly, even if what followed was no better.

    Reply
  10. Hank chinaski

    All that and not one Clockwork Orange reference? I am dissapoint.

    Someone call CPS on those parents.

    Reply
  11. Booty_Toucher

    I’m left of center, I work in SF, and I applaud the method of encouraging homeless people to move with use of classical music (not to mention other means). I also despise when folks play their music at audible levels in public spaces. While people like Lily Hirsch and others who criticize the “weaponization” of music against the homeless are almost undoubtedly lefty progressives, I think you’d find that most people who identify as liberals share my viewpoints. Point is, I don’t see it as left vs right, and I think it’s silly to frame it that way. There are wackos on both sides of the political spectrum. The Burger King story referenced herein is super old, and any objections to the methods generated almost zero buzz locally.

    In regards to pop music assault on our ears, I fully agree. I go to a gym that is for the most part fantastic, but my god, the music they play… if I have to hear that fucking Chainsmokers song one more time, I may rip someones throat out. Fucking nails on a chalkboard.

    Reply
  12. Opaddington

    Let’s set up a sprawling bum camp on Cleveland State’s campus. We’ll see how comrade Hirsch reacts to stepping over human feces and used needles as she strolls across campus. She can enjoy her morning Starbucks while the scent of sewage wafts across her nostrils. I’m sure she’ll love it. She’ll probably drop a deuce on the sidewalk herself to show solidarity with the proletariat. In the winter, we’ll move the bums inside…in the hallway outside her office. We can’t have the indigent shivering in the face of a wintry gale. Once again, she will welcome this arrangement with a smile. We would certainly never see any hypocrisy from a smug leftist.

    Reply
    • Sean Goldstein

      Sprawling Bum Camp? Sounds like a British camp where all the counselors are buggering pedophiles. How on Earth did you acquire the knowledge of how to set one up, and why would you?

      I try to keep an open mind, but this is deeply disturbing.

      Reply
  13. Shrug

    Only tangentially related to the piece, but “Adidon” is the beat diss track since “Ether”, right?

    Reply
  14. Rick T.

    I suppose the next logical step is for us to remove the locks on our doors and windows so the homeless and criminal can “reclaim” our privatae spaces.

    Reply
    • Opaddington

      You should do that and put on some rap music so your new housemates feel comfortable. However, do not expect Lily Hirsch and her ilk to follow suit. They’ve exhibited their virtue via ceaseless blathering. You cannot expect them to allow their personal environs to be blighted by the dirty, criminal bastards, too.

      Reply
  15. Sean Goldstein

    A lot to unpack here.

    Let’s start with this: “Nobody is clutching their pearls about the blizzard of sexual messages we send to children through our public music and culture.”

    I don’t think that holds as a blanket statement. Localities have forced stores that sell magazines to hide covers that are sexually explicit. Music and TV stations bleep curses. Sexually explicit material airs only after dark.

    Certainly it’s not perfect. And with the internet, all manner of things are only a click away. But not terribly different from a generation ago when nothing got between young Brooke and her Calvins or a generation prior when a dog was ripping off Jodie Foster’s bikini bottom.

    We still have to parent. We still have to help our kids to interpret the world around them, now coming through more media and from more voices than ever before.

    Reply
    • Disinterested-Observer

      “Are you worried about your ‘performance?’ Try these penis pills!”

      Heard on every sports radio station at all hours of the day.

      And you didn’t address the insanity of a prepubescent child even thinking about sexuality, let alone choosing one, or the fact that there are several tv shows dedicated to same.

      Reply
      • Opaddington

        Snoop Dogg is doing ads on local am sports talk for pills that enhance your boner AND make your hair grow back. Is anyone influenced in a positive manner by that goon’s endorsement of a medical product?

        Reply
          • Sean Goldstein

            I do not know who specifically would be influenced by Snoop’s ads. I do recall that President Trump was angry at his personal physician for outing him as a longtime user of the hair pills.

          • Opaddington

            Assuming the hair pill thing is anything but specious, Trump’s former doctor violated doctor-patient confidentiality. The man’s a hero, a hero I say!

  16. dejal

    It is really about property rights. If I play music on my property (store, house, apartment…) and I don’t piss off my immediate legal right to be there neighbors (other stores, houses and tenants) by being too loud, transients (and not in the sense of homeless and bums) have very little rights to countermand what I do. They, you and me don’t have any skin in the game to bitch.

    Theoretically, until the insane, perpetually butt-hurt “advocates” make a big enough stink about it.

    Reply
  17. elad sputnik

    I wish they would play classical at the local supermarkets. Instead it’s insipid 80’s and 90’s Top 100 Pop via some budget streaming service. I hated that shit when it was new and my opinion has only soured since.

    Reply
  18. Jim

    What I took from this piece is that if classical music is played outside a Burger King in San Francisco, some LQBTQ kid in New York is responsible.

    Reply
  19. CliffG

    This is really good to know. Now if on the off chance I wander the streets of Seattle, I can have my, er, personal defense item on one hip, and my phone playing the Brandenburg Concertos at a reasonable level and know I will be completely safe. Awesome.

    Reply
  20. Dirty Dingus McGee

    As an evil white boomer bastard, my musical weapon of choice is either old shitkicking, goat roping, country music, or in case’s of dire personal survival needs, bluegrass. Either have been known to cause people to drop even the food they are eating, and beat feet far far away.

    Note that I specified OLD country music, not this new pansy crap that thinks it’s country music. It MIGHT be country, I’m just not sure WHICH country.

    This little song sum’s up my feelings pretty well;

    Reply
    • Dirty Dingus McGee

      Additionally, cover songs like this have been known to have certain groups spinning on their eyebrows;

      Reply
    • Cdotson

      Yes, bluegrass works nearly as well. I was actually surprised that the local Cedar Fair-run park to which we have season passes plays bluegrass through loudspeakers in one area of the park despite the lack of an obvious thematic purpose. It is one of the less densely built-up areas of the park with some vegetation (shade!). Maybe they have had problems with restless natives who scarper at the sound of banjos.

      I rather enjoy sitting on a bench waiting for the kids to finish a ride and listen to the Iron Horse and Old Crow Medicine Show.

      Reply
  21. rpn453

    A frequent thought I have when patronizing a place like Home Depot or McDonald’s is that the people working there must be terribly depressed at having to listen to garbage music on repeat all day. Maybe they don’t mind it though. Maybe they even enjoy it. I could never function in that setting. I’m not in that good of a mood consistently enough.

    I suppose construction work is out too. I could never deal with the beeping. I’d have no problem with it if it had a useful function. But the idea that everyone for blocks around must listen to that in order to support the existence and breeding of people dumb enough to hang around directly behind running pieces of construction equipment – people who would only flee from that large, noisy, obvious danger if an obnoxious beeping noise is constantly directed at them – is just too much for me to take on a daily basis.

    Weaponized classical music, on the other hand, does serve a useful function.

    Reply
  22. Bark M

    When I took over as district retail manager for Kentucky at Cricket in 2008, the first thing I did was to ban all rap and pop music in our stores—the previous manager had been playing hip-hop, rap, and R&B non-stop, and then wondered why customers acted like idiots 24/7 in the store. When we switched to the Jazz channel, store incidents were more than halved.

    Holiday music for anybody who has worked retail is like kryptonite. I cannot stand to listen to it to this day.

    Reply
    • JustPassinThru

      ^^THIS^^

      The Elites have been rending their clothes for generations, worrying about black janitors, cigarette-smoking, and sex roles in movies and television programs; but somehow the endless spew of profanity, descriptions of misogyny and violence against police, white people and others, in rap “music” videos, is harmless and uplifting.

      When I was living in Denver, 1995-97, the use of classical music to clear doorways of bums was a new thing, I thought, a local thing – vagrancy, encamped vagrancy, was becoming an undeniable problem to the shops along the 16th Street Mall. It was both a tourist attraction in its own right – a few blocks from Coors Field; as well as the receipt of a lot of pass-through traffic, people checking out Downtown Denver en route to RMNP…and the merchants, and even the otherwise-liberal government leaders, wanted it cleaned up.

      Time took me elsewhere; and the last ten years (thank all gods!) I have lived in rural locales. I did not know, but should have expected, an Elite backlash to the tactic of driving off the feral, with a product of Western European civilization – using classical music as Dracula’s prey would wield a cross.

      Good on them. I’d prefer to see Vagrancy laws enforced and workhouses opened; but any defense is better than abject submission.

      Reply
  23. tyates

    I wonder what affect Johnny Cash music would have. I mean, how are you going to cause trouble while listening to “sooner or later God will cut you down…”

    Reply
  24. rambo furum

    Lily E. Hirsch has written three books. Take a look at what the first two are about. Every damned time.

    Reply
  25. S2k Chris

    I’ve been doing this, unconsciously and unknowingly, for about 6 months. After dinner with the family every night, I say “Alexa, play classical music” and everyone else scampers off so I can quietly do the dishes in peace for 15 minutes. I don’t have any great love for classical music, but it’s just a nice relaxing way to start the evening, and that it chases off the kids, even better.

    Reply
  26. AoLetsGo

    Noise Assaults!
    I have blacklisted some fine ethnic restaurants due to their loud music – glad some of them offer take out.

    Also how many offices allow people to play their moronic music on tinny speakers. I need quiet to think, I don’t care if they were told that they could listen at a reasonable volume from nine to eleven.

    Reply
  27. CJinSD

    I’m late to the party here, but I just wanted to say that I enjoyed this editorial and have shared it with others.

    Reply
  28. Jeff Zekas

    Excellent article, Jack. My co workers and I were discussing this same topic the other day. Here in communist controlled Eugene, Oregon, the city allows bums and scoundrels to control the public spaces. In neighboring blue collar Springfield, the cops don’t follow the leftist party line, and kick out bums and dealers from their downtown. The contrast between non working liberal Eugene and working conservative Springfield is like night and day. Every night, I pray that classical music will emanate from Dari Mart, and chase away the drug dealers, but to no avail: conservatives and libertarians are vilified here. Yeah, I’d like to move to Texas, but we have family here, so we’re stuck for the duration. Luckily, I have your articles to keep me sane.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.