It’s Just Lines On A Map, You Know

If you have time today, you might want to read about something that happened one hundred years ago. On July 17, 1918, V.I. Lenin (you might know him as the fellow from the Johnny Socko song) ordered the execution of the Romanovs. The details are recounted in dispassionate fashion at Wikipedia but they are enough to curl your hair: one of the children had an entire pistol magazine emptied into him before being bayoneted a few times, after which he was shot in the skull because he was still alive. When the stripped and mutilated bodies were delivered to a gang of Bolsheviks for disposal, they were enraged because they had expected to be able to rape the Romanov daughters before killing them. Failing that, they decided to use their fingers on the dead bodies.

When I read the Twitterati screaming for the triumph of “politics is personal”, that’s what comes to mind for me: a group of “resisters” abusing a dead woman’s body because someone told them she was a class enemy. These are forces which should not be released lightly. We think of America as a place where political discussion has always been relatively polite and reasonable but that’s only because our high-school history books omitted thousands of incidents where things got out of hand in the worst way possible, from the Memphis Massacre to the Bonus Army. I see a lot of people on Reddit and elsewhere, members of both the Blue and the Red tribes, who are very comfortable with the idea of destroying people’s careers and lives because of their particular stance on a political issue. That’s all well and good until the person you’ve destroyed decides that the shame of not being able to feed his children is too much and that the only possible answer is to come to your house and remove your face with a butter knife before committing what they call “blue suicide” nowadays.

Civilization is a veneer that we would do well to keep in place as long as humanly possible. David Brin, who is about as liberal as they come, wrote The Postman as an answer to post-apocalyptic fiction and a reminder that we are all better off because the mail gets delivered every day. As a parent, I would agree.

On the other hand, there might well be a breaking point at which it’s worth reconsidering the whole enterprise, or at least the Terms Of Service associated with said enterprise.


The nice people at Reason have just written a piece decrying the end of German infatuation with open borders. They look at the abject failure of immigrants to integrate with German society, find work, or even obey basic laws as a failure of German policy, arguing that Germany needs to throw out its labor rules and minimum-wage laws in order to allow immigrants an economic foothold in the region. And you know what? Strictly speaking, they’re not wrong. In a country where nearly every wage must be a living wage by legal fiat and it’s almost impossible to fire someone, why would any sensible employer choose a refugee over an actual German-speaking ethnic German? Suppose that you were an American who owned a McDonald’s in Iowa. You have to pay your fry cook $20/hour and guarantee his job. Instead of an “undocumented” Mexican, wouldn’t you rather have a Vassar graduate for that work? ‘Cause you could certainly get one at that wage.

I agree with the author of this piece that no good will come from bringing in a million people who have absolutely no common ground with the people they are replacing, and then preventing them from working. The elephant in the room that Reason chooses to ignore is why the migrants need to be there in the first place. At least until the end of the piece, where they toss in a monstrous hand-wave and hope you won’t look too closely:

Migration is still a must for Germany’s future, thanks to worrying demographic patterns. Without a lot of new workers, the aging population and its shrinking taxpayer base will lay ruin to the country’s generous welfare system.

That pair of sentences contains a lot of assumptions which deserve individual analysis:

  • Migrants sourced from unstable areas who have no usable skills will, in fact, be taxpayers;
  • Those “taxpayers” will have no issue with supporting an aging class of people to whom they are not bound by class, clan, religion, or philosophy;
  • The retention of a “generous welfare system” is more important than any possible negative effects from open borders;
  • There is even the slightest justification for retaining a German state in its present form.

There’s a lot of very comfortable racism embedded into the whole idea that you can bring a million-plus African men (yeah, they’re mostly young men, even if you allow the ridiculousness of calling 16-and-17-year-old male refugees “children”) into Germany and those men will be absolutely loyal and servile to the current system. That’s never happened. Not once in human history has anything like that happened. Why should it? Why should the refugees have any patience with, or respect for, the German system? From their perspective, it’s a bunch of old-ass infidels looking for a free ride in retirement.

Put yourself in their place. You’re leaving your home, whether it’s because of an actual war or, more likely, because there’s no work. You are allowed to enter Mexico, which for some reason in this alternate universe has a thriving economy that is aging out. You have a million American men marching behind you. Are you just gonna put your nose to the grindstone to cover retirement benefits, or are you going to change things around until you have your own churches, your own choices, and your own government? Once that happens, and you have a firm grip on the levers of power, then what use would you have for those old Mexicans?

We actually know the answer to that question because it’s how the United States acquired California in the first place — and it’s how Mexico is currently taking it back. Demography is destiny. German babies are increasingly named after the Prophet. If you think a generation of Mohammads will have any interest in paying the nursing-home costs of childless old German do-nothings, you’re nuts.

Let’s take a look at my final assumption: There is even the slightest justification for retaining a German state in its present form. It’s on my mind because my son and I have been talking off and on about German history for a while now. We started with the Roman invasions; we are currently at Bismarck and the first unification. Something that I’ve been careful to make plain is that Germany is not just a set of lines on a map. It is a group of related peoples. Losing much of Prussia to the Polish state after World War I didn’t magically make those people not Germans. Ten years ago, I worked with a stereotypically German fellow named Felix who told me he was a Frenchman from France.

“Hmm, let me guess,” I said, “you’re from Alsace-Lorraine.” I was right — and when I pressed him on the matter he admitted that he didn’t feel much enthusiasm for France.

There is nothing sacred about the German borders. They have been re-drawn at least five times in the past 130 years. Germany isn’t a set of lines on a map. It’s a group of people. Those people have been pushed to the limit of their generosity regarding open borders, and they have decided to call time on the matter. Could that impact their future welfare benefits? Possibly. But those benefits are lost anyway. There aren’t enough Germans to pay them and there aren’t any Africans who have an interest in paying them.

The real question is: what comes next? Should the refugees be repatriated? Should the borders change yet again, perhaps to cut an Asian-African nation out of whole cloth on soil that used to be German? I don’t have the answers. All I can offer is that the process needs to be well-thought-out, impersonal, and civilized. Every single appeal to emotion will return five more in the opposite direction. One side has a dead boy on a beach; the other has thousands of rape victims. All of that has to be put aside. The alternative is to have personalized politics, which always leads to civil war. In this case, it would also be a jihad, because the majority of the refugees don’t believe what the Germans do (which, more than ever, is… nothing.) If you’re not up to speed on what happens during a jihad, then take it from me: it makes the Russian Revolution look like the Russian Tea Room.

69 Replies to “It’s Just Lines On A Map, You Know”

  1. rich

    “Hmm, let me guess,” I said, “you’re from Alsace-Lorraine.”

    Felix’s jaw hit the floor. An American had heard of Alsace-Lorraine?

    Reply
    • Rick T.

      A source of very excellent white wines but not that particularly common in the US outside of select urban stores.

      Reply
    • Disinterested-Observer

      Anyone with a passing knowledge of the history between France and Germany over the past 200 years. So probably not that many people, but not zero.

      Reply
  2. David Florida

    The elephant in the room: how many bullseyes in ten can our elementary school sons make at fifty yards with that old Ruger 10/22? It’s a question soon to be joined by discussions of history, and the fact that migration is probably inevitable…

    Reply
    • 98horn

      The army did a study after Vietnam, and it turns out that a significant number of soldiers “miss high” in live combat because they do not want to kill. Hitting the target is not the problem.

      Reply
      • silentsod

        If you’ve read Col. Grossman’s books there’s some dickering on the data he uses to make his case on soldier’s willingness to kill. Utilizing ammunition expended per kill is also questionable because it is total ammunition expended instead of subtracting out suppressive, indirect, etc forms of fire.

        Reply
  3. Dirty Dingus McGee

    I suspect I’m gonna need a LOT of popcorn to get thru the comments.

    There are already a few countries that are taking a stand, Poland, Hungary, and starting to in Italy. Is it too late? Probably. Given the state of affairs here in the good ole US of A, once the “immigrants” are here, it’s mighty hard to get them out. Especially given the porosity of our borders where many are back inside of a week or 2. Never minding those that overstay a visa or claim refugee status from a country they are not a citizen of.

    Here in metro Atlanta, I can buy, for $500-$2500 fake papers, with credit cards, that will stand up to all but the most rigid scrutiny. I’m sure it’s no different around any major city, or even in any part of Europe.

    Reply
    • Shortest Circuit

      Eastern European states had bigger and smaller scandals with officials effectively selling citizenship to white Russians, and such folk (non-EU states) so they can work in Germany. So you’re right there.
      Germany is slowly slipping down to second world status, capitals like Cologne, Stuttgart or Berlin turn into Left4Dead levels after midnight, police and army has to be told not to leave the far-right AfD newspaper visible in the cruisers, don’t sing Wehrmacht songs etc. Most people are fed up with this whole immigration problem. I believe the first big problems are going to come when the immigrants kids hit puberty, so in 15-18 years. I hope to get the H out of here by then. Or renew my permit. One or the other.

      Reply
  4. Jeff Zekas

    Jack, perfectly stated. Too bad this article isn’t on the front page of the New York Times!

    The other day, I was talking with an old hippie woman. “I don’t believe in identifiers” she said, when I joked that I am “an old man.” Lots of liberals don’t believe in identifiers: race, age, culture. They want to see the “rainbow” nation. The problem is: EVERYONE ELSE believes that THEY belong to a group. This is why we had the war in Bosnia. This is why France, the UK and German are in turmoil. This is why invaders (nee “immigrants”) are raping native Swedes, why German women were assaulted on New Years, why there is massive crime in London.

    Yet, this reality is ignored by most western governments. The end is near. There will be blood. Because assimilation is a fantasy.

    Reply
    • mopar4wd

      To expand on this Nate. It seems it’s not the people it’s the amount. As far as i can tell reading studies from the left and right economists Refugees (not immigrants or illegal immigrants). cost us tax dollars until 7-8 years in this country at which point they start averaging net tax payers. By year 14-16 they have paid off their theoretical debt and are producing actual government revenue. So in theory yes bringing in young men with 20-25 or more working years in front of them will result in a increase in tax revenue. The bigger issue is to maintain stability the percentage of the population that arrives every year needs to be controlled. It would be nice if that wasn’t the case but really if you want stable peace big changes in short periods of time is not a great idea.

      Now on Jacks comments on Cali. Well Mexican immigrant population I believe peaked in that state in 2005 or 2006. Since then it’s been declining with an increase of migrants from other areas of the world. Basically if Mexico was going to retake Cali (culturally at least) it already would have happened.

      Reply
      • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

        The amount of Mexican immigration by year peaked a decade ago. But that’s like saying that your tub is draining because you’re kept the stopper in but you’ve turned down the flow of water.

        Reply
      • -Nate

        @ mopar4wd :

        Yes, agreed .

        My people are Scots / Irish, we came through Ellis Island and we don’t speak Gaelic, eat Haggis (ew) play bag pipes or do other third world non sense .

        Ditto my ex wife who came illegally and worked her butt off to become a legal U.S. Naturalized Citizen doesn’t take welfare, food stamps or other crap .

        She _ASSIMILATED_ unlike many who came here looking for a better life .

        Immigrants are a goodly part of what makes America great but -not- if they chose to remain out of our mainstream culture .

        -Nate

        Reply
      • Panzer

        I don’t necessarily doubt the idea that actual refugees are a economic benefit long term, but another problem apart from the number of ‘refugees’ admitted annually is how many of them are actual refugees rather than ‘economic migrants’.

        Reply
  5. ScottS

    The keywords of the post are “Jihad” and [Sic] “Mohammads”. The missing corollary is “Christian” and “Christ”. In my view, the central factor in the current world “condition” is the spread of progressivism and it’s central pillar of godlessness. The ugly truth is the modern progressive movement is directly rooted in communism, and communism is incompatible with god and religion. The only legitimate power is the State. I view the incoherent and outrageous behavior of so many people today as a cry for help. How else can you explain the wide support for Burnie Sanders? They have been raised to believe in nothing, and thus have no moral foundation. We are on the cusp of the next era of Christian reformation. When the traditional people of Europe rediscover their lost religious past, Muhammad will have a very big problem on his hands.

    Reply
    • safe as milk

      @ScottS – in my experience, there is no correlation between piety and morality. some of the worst crimes in history have been perpetrated by religious people.

      Reply
      • ScottS

        I think Europe will erupt in a holy war against Islam and morality will be scarce just as observed with ISIS holding the severed heads of their religious foes. It will be a few years into the future, but the tide has already turned in that direction.

        Reply
    • Eric H

      I’ve said it here before, religion is a blight on humanity. All of them.
      The sooner it ends up on the scrap heap of bad ideas, the better off we’ll all be.

      Reply
      • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

        While I understand how you feel, the greatest crimes against humanity and the biggest body counts of the twentieth century were caused by atheist, rational, freethinking men who scorned the very idea of religion.

        Reply
        • mopar4wd

          Well it could be argued the Armenian Genocide was religious. Also Rwanda. If you want to bridge the centuries Congo was a massive body count performed by A Christian who used missionaries as a bit of cover. It was mostly capitalism that took people out in that one.
          But yeah the top 3 in the 20th century would be mostly done by atheists. I think if you go on a longer time line it levels out quite a bit.
          Basically in the end I think we focus on this does religion or no religion kill people in the end people kill people. We always have a desire to be better or do something better then our peers. This constant competition creates great innovation, but also produces some very nasty results when we let it get out of hand.

          Reply
      • MrGreenMan

        I’m sure you’re happy to live as a barbarian on the sweet fruits of thousands of years of a Western culture enriched and tempered by religion so that you can enjoy the decline. It works for Heartiste, right? Aprèz vois la deluge?

        There are more introspective atheists out there who concluded from about any metric – even just plain old utilitarianism gains for you personally – that you should show up to be social for an hour a week on Sundays at the local Methodist church. Molyneux is just the most recent one.

        Try extricating some form of religion from the human experience. I remember the atheist hippies in Ann Arbor – they believe in fairies and make fairy doors, and they believed in crystals, vibes, karma, reincarnation, unitarian universalist ingathering into some sort of heaven – all while claiming to be atheists because they just hated Jesus.

        Reply
        • everybodyhatesscott

          Heartiste enjoys the poolside. Captain capitalism is enjoying the decline.

          Try extricating some form of religion from the human experience. I remember the atheist hippies in Ann Arbor – they believe in fairies and make fairy doors, and they believed in crystals, vibes, karma, reincarnation, unitarian universalist ingathering into some sort of heaven – all while claiming to be atheists because they just hated Jesus.

          It’s pretty obvious humans are hardwired to believe in something and if it’s not God, we’llreplace it with something. The current progressive religion is diversity

          Reply
          • Eric H

            I disagree with this:
            “It’s pretty obvious humans are hardwired to believe in something and if it’s not God, we’ll replace it with something.”

            Humans are curious, they look for answers to questions they have. Most people are trusting enough to believe answers other people give them, even if they have no basis in fact. Religion is a beautiful lie told to you by someone you trust.

            As for the request that I should get some exposure to religion, I was an altar boy for years at the church I attended as a youth. I am not ignorant of Christianity. The bible is a fine morals play but claiming it as fact is ludicrous.

    • nightfly

      There was also an amazing Twitter thread on the subject from a lady named Marina Amaral, who painstakingly colorizes old photographs and has a book coming out soon about the Holocaust. She has been working on several historical pictures of the Romanovs, some of which were partially colored by the Duchess Anastasia. She goes over the whole story, with many of the pictures (most still in B/W). It is staggering work. I believe if you start here you should be able to read the whole thread in order.

      Reply
  6. Doug Houli

    The Romanovs…A Wikipedia page also entirely written/referenced by Helen Rappaport. Fine source, indeed.

    Reply
  7. ltrftc

    Jack, I’m quite surprised that you haven’t shared your thoughts on what just happened in Helsinki. I’m genuinely interested in your take on things.

    Reply
    • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

      I think Trump is showing the Eurocrats and the Chinese how quickly this country could change alignment if it wanted to.

      He lectured the Eurocrats that he was tired of spending US GDP to defend them against Russia. Then he went to shake hands with Putin so everybody could see that he meant what he said.

      This business of “legitimizing Putin” is ridiculous, as was Obama’s characterization of Russia as a “regional power”. Russia has the capability to kill every man, woman, and Dreamer in the United States.

      Reply
      • mopar4wd

        I understand what you mean. And Trump was doing his business-man display of power and respect even if I don’t mean it thing (lie to you today maybe tomorrow maybe not) . But in the world of international politics optics matter alot. I think it would be better to have good relations with Russia but some of Trumps attitudes in particular with Putin seem a bit Lassiez-faire.
        Europe can protect itself if it wants. But artificially pissing them off when they are actually increasing their spending on defense ( just not as fast as T wants). seems a poor choice. Same as enacting tariffs against our allies instead of joining with them to cause real pain on actual bad actors.

        Reply
        • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

          Trump’s great insight here, I think, goes something like this:

          When you have a trade deficit with a country and you are also guaranteeing that country’s military security, you are not that country’s ally. You are that country’s vassal state. We have the same relationship with China right now that India had with Great Britain in 1910.

          Reply
          • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

            You’re right, of course, The Raj was stripped of its raw materials to feed British industry, which in turn controlled its currency and called all the shots…

            Sorry, I don’t have any more time to respond to you, I need to take some stuff to the recycler and then take a look at what T-bills are doing.

      • ltrftc

        I appreciate the response, as is usually the case you have a perspective that gets me to look at the situation from another angle.

        What is your take on Trump saying he believes Putin over the USA intelligence agencies?

        Reply
        • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

          My take is I don’t blame him.

          Bush II believed the intelligence agencies and look what that got him. JFK believed the CIA when they said they could knock Castro out. LBJ believed that the CIA could operate Air America without problems. Reagan thought Iran-Contra would work.

          Come to think of it, when was the last time an American intelligence agency was worth believing? I’m thinking you’d have to go back to the OSS and Midway.

          Reply
          • ltrftc

            Do you think we are experiencing a new patriotism, where we are turning against our institutions? I too grew up in that era where the Russians killed Apollo Creed, and I found what happened in Helsinki extraordinary.

            We are now living in a time where rather than celebrate our country’s institutions, we are declaring them as corrupt and raging war on them. The patriotic commitment of a loyalty to a place and its institutions appears gone for a good part of the population, and suddenly patriotism becomes loyal to nothing. Freed from these bonds, patriotism can be quickly moulded into whatever the politics of the moment demand, such as what we are seeing with the number of Americans viewing Russia as an ally.

            I can understand how you’ve rationalised it in the context of intelligence agency / foreign policy failures, however you’ve overlooked all of the foreign policy successes since WWII. Is this a new kind of patriotism that is purely personal, driven by the feeling that America can’t be retrieved, but that it can still be embodied in a single leader?

            BTW, I enjoyed your Independence Day piece on TTAC not just because it validated my decision to buy an LS3 powered daily, but because it had a measure of optimism and hope that has largely been missing from your writing over the past few years.

          • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

            To be fair, the Soviet Union killed Apollo Creed. They also tried to elect Mondale: (https://www.heritage.org/election-integrity/report/how-moscow-meddles-the-wests-elections)

            Reagan told Gorbachev to tear down the wall, and from that moment on I was glad to see the Soviet Union, our implacable ideological enemy, replaced by Russia, our fellow-traveler in capitalism.

            You ask,

            “Is this a new kind of patriotism that is purely personal, driven by the feeling that America can’t be retrieved, but that it can still be embodied in a single leader?”

            America can absolutely be retrieved. But nobody is willing to even talk about what would be necessary to make that happen.

            I’ll admit to becoming a lot more pessimistic since I had a child. I’ll work on balancing that out.

          • hank chinaski

            More pointedly, the US is credited with helping elect Yeltsin, and that’s one of many elections we’ve meddled with.
            Regarding recent Russian ‘meddling’, all that’s been released has been funding of a few lame Facebook pages and Nigerian-prince-level phishing of Podesta’s email to publicly leak (never denied) DNC shenanigans against Sanders.

            Perhaps more Americans are seeing Russia as allies, at least in the sense of the West against Caliphate barbarians in the mideast, but crucially at most as only rivals and not enemies. Rivals with the shared capability of global extinction that warrant open dialogue . The USSR and Warsaw Pact are both long buried.

            The press’ utter meltdown and comparing the Helsinki meeting to the Holocaust or Pearl Harbor is more than odd. When both establishment Republicans and Democrats agree on something so vehemently, be confident that they are full of shit.

  8. Rob

    I would be very interested to learn what French schoolchildren are taught about Charles Martel and the Battle of Tours, if they are taught about him at all.

    Reply
    • Harry

      I wonder similar things, or how the Ottoman wars, Spanish Crusades, are taught. I always imagined it was kind of like the War of 1812 or the Spanish-American. Not one of the big 4, but you would spend a day or two on it a few times throughout primary education.

      Reply
  9. Paul M.

    As the world cup recently proved, no one misses America, its fans or its culture. If America wants to build a wall around herself so be it. The world seems to get along well enough together and do just fine without.

    While America has started to look inwards, China is filling the gap in more ways than one. Trump and his co-horts are worried about China trade, meanwhile China is expanding its trade with Middle East and Africa in ways that America used to do. They are not looking back. They are the new superpowers.

    Make no mistake about it. The world needs a good America. But a hating, scared, self-obsessed America is not what the world needs. They will move and replace it with Europe. If Europe starts looking inwards, China, the new superpower, will take over. Articles like this are no different than hate that was displayed towards Italians, and Irish previously in this country. Or towards Jews in Europe in various periods. The new scapegoats are Mexicans and Muslims and Africans from shix-xole countries.

    The only thing we have to fear, is fear itself. America the land of opportunity and the land that migrants wish to come to, is becoming the land that separates children from their parents and builds walls keeping herself away from the rest. Hopefully, Europe is smarter than that in long term.

    I left Indiana and live in Atlanta and love its diversity. I don’t miss the Midwest for one day. Any time I go to visit my family still living there, I know I made the smartest decision ever to move to a city full of African Americans, Mexicans, Asians of all origins, Muslims, Indians and whites just getting along. Long live diversity.

    Reply
    • Rob

      “As the world cup recently proved, no one misses America, its fans or its culture. If America wants to build a wall around herself so be it.” Yes, American soccer’s current underperformance illustrates the decline of American worldwide influence in culture, technology, innovation, you name it. The Italians didn’t qualify for Russia 2018 and nobody eats pasta anymore.
      I’m sure the schools in Indiana were thorough enough to discuss U.S. isolationism prior to the middle of the 20th century, how Europe will never be a coherent union similar to the U.S. (for a variety of reasons), and how China is always lurking on the horizon but never quite materializes to displace the U.S.

      Reply
      • hank chinaski

        Oh noes, not the sportsball!

        I’m flummoxed by isolationism becoming a dirty word. That was kind of the point of our independence and most of our national existence.

        Reply
    • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

      “America the land of opportunity and the land that migrants wish to come to, is becoming the land that separates children from their parents and builds walls keeping herself away from the rest.”

      I’m not sure where you are getting that. The last time we had this high a percentage of first-generation immigrants in America, they were setting up Jamestown. It took the Irish ONE HUNDRED AND TEN YEARS to get 4.5 million people into the country. Mexico accomplished the same feat between 1990 and 2005.

      Reply
      • Eric H

        Sure, but you can’t walk from Ireland. There’s only so many boats.
        Also Ireland had fewer than 7M people during that timespan, Mexico has around 100M.
        It is not an honest comparison.

        Reply
        • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

          Sure it is, because we are talking about the impact on the host country, not the percentage of exiles.

          Now, if you want to compare to the American population… The Irish who arrived in 1930 were entering a nation of 123 million people, while the Mexicans who enter today are arriving in a geographically larger country of 325 million. But you’re still talking about more than twice the numbers in one-tenth of the time. Adjust it for population, and let’s say that Mexicans (and other South Americans) are entering the country at a rate of, oh, only ten times that the Irish arrivals.

          Only in homeopathy do we consider one-tenth of something to be as consequential as a full dose.

          There are now as many Mexicans and Mexican-Americans in this country as there are African-Americans:

          http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2017/09/18/how-the-u-s-hispanic-population-is-changing/

          And when you look at the total Hispanic population of the United States, it’s basically one out of five people.

          Another way to look at it: Mexicans outnumber all the descendants of the Irish in this country. 120 years’ wort of famine immigration from Ireland doesn’t matter as much as the Mexican tide from 1990 to today.

          So it’s not reasonable to compare Mexican immigration to Irish immigration. A better analogy, numbers-wise, would be the sacking of Rome.

          Reply
          • mopar4wd

            Ok so I guess here is the question, were 25 years into the boom immigration. The boom has pretty much stopped. What happened since the boom that makes you feel it has upset the balance in the country?
            I mean I hear Spanish more then I used too but I don’t see other real effects.
            Also note the population boom was partially do to higher birth rates which oddly enough seem to be declining since 2009. Or basically since Mexican Americans born here replaced immigrants as the majority of the population. All signs seem to point to them assimilating well into society in the 2nd generation.
            I would say the system accepted the overload well. Thou again having some limits to keep political balance seems prudent.

          • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

            Yeah, but:

            * Without some sort of effective control we are relying on Mexico to not feel like sending another 57 million people across the border. The election of AMLO makes that kind of forbearance less than a foregone conclusion;

            * The wave of Mexican immigration, much of it illegal, changed the political and cultural layout of California, Texas, Arizona, and New Mexico. The system accepted the load by electing a bunch of Nury Martinez-style demagogues.

          • CJinSD

            “I mean I hear Spanish more then I used too but I don’t see other real effects.”

            The tax payers who bleed out in Southern California emergency rooms while waiting in line behind a thousand illegals with the sniffles see the real effects.

    • silentsod

      “The world needs a good America. But a hating, scared, self-obsessed America is not what the world needs.”

      Placing American interests first is in line with every other country’s behavior. This is not hateful, it is not driven by fear, and it may be self-obsessed but why should we put any one else’s interests before our own self-interest? We are already a country of people who love to help others, and it will be a disservice to ourselves and others if we bleed ourselves dry. We can’t help anyone if we always place others before ourselves.

      Reply
      • Carmine

        Plus, we all know China is clear, transparent and totally forward thinking, I think they finally stopped throwing girl babies in the river a few years ago.

        Progress!!!

        Reply
  10. safe as milk

    @Paul M – While America has started to look inwards, China is filling the gap in more ways than one. Trump and his co-horts are worried about China trade, meanwhile China is expanding its trade with Middle East and Africa in ways that America used to do. They are not looking back. They are the new superpowers.
    you need to ask yourself, to what effect. when the pundits talk about american interests, they mean american corporate interests. it’s all well and good to compete in the global maketplace but we have gone lightyears beyond that. the whole superpower concept is leftover coldwar bs. we literally have so many overseas bases, that it’s impossible to lookup the exact number. we are paying for that by letting our country fall apart. and for what? to enrich the few that have stock portfolios and keep the gas and food cheap enough that there is no threat of social unrest? the chinese have no interest invading the us. they have never invaded japan, korea, etc. being a superpower isn’t on the agenda.

    Reply
    • Eric H

      “China has never invaded Japan, Korea, etc.”

      China and Japan had been going at it back and forth for centuries. It stopped after WWII.

      Reply
      • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

        Yeah the hatred between China and Japan makes American racism look like a comedy routine.

        Reply
        • safe as milk

          i do believe that the japan has never been successfully concquered except by the u.s.

          the mongols tried it a couple of times but failed because of the divine wind otherwise known as “kamikaze.”

          the koreans for most of their history paid tribute to china in return for military protection from japan. the chinese and the japanese fought over the dominance of korea in 1894. chinese hegemony: yes. colonization: no.

          Reply
  11. Harry

    I wonder similar things, or how the Ottoman wars, Spanish Crusades, are taught. I always imagined it was kind of like the War of 1812 or the Spanish-American. Not one of the big 4, but you would spend a day or two on it a few times throughout primary education.

    Reply
  12. JustPassinThru

    Unspoken here, is the set of beliefs that got Germany, and the UK, and us, to this point.

    Belief 1: Magic Dirt. We’re successful because of our Magic Dirt. That’s why San Diego is flourishing, or was; while ten miles south, Tijuana was a train wreck of humanity.

    Belief 2: Crushing government, the Welfare State, and substituting legal minutia for moral suasion and morality instruction…all these can replace the family as a basic social unit.

    Belief 3: There is no social or demographic cost to making sex easy and free, abortion cheap and free, and divorce easy, cheap and universal.

    The Progressive Left believes all these things and with time and decades, has forced them on Western Europe and America. And I posit that these are why the Germans, and we, are where we are.

    And the future’s not lookin’ so grand for either of us, either.

    Reply
    • safe as milk

      @JustPassinThru – i can’t argue with your descrition of the left in the u.s. sadly, all of this is mutation of traditional leftist goals. the left is supposed to stand for protecting working people from the ravages of capitalism. that should mean sensible programs like unemployment insurance and social security set up on a fiscally responsible manner and regulating industry to minimize polution and dangerous working conditions. it also means protecting the first amendment including the right of workers to organize. further, it means stopping overseas wars that have nothing to do with national defense. all this came from the left before they lost their soul. fdr & jfk are spinning in their graves.

      Reply
  13. vaujot

    As an immigrant to Germany*, I have to say the following:
    – Migrants sourced from unstable areas who have no usable skills will, in fact, be taxpayers;
    Since the 1950s, Millions of immigrants have come to Germany, acquired usable skills and become taxpayers. Many of them are Muslim.
    – Those “taxpayers” will have no issue with supporting an aging class of people to whom they are not bound by class, clan, religion, or philosophy;
    The immigrants who are already here generally do and take no more issue with it than the Germans. Nobody is particularly thrilled to pay taxes or social security contributions but as long as people can expect to receive social security benefits when they retire, they accept it.
    – The retention of a “generous welfare system” is more important than any possible negative effects from open borders;
    The demographic development in Germany is indeed a challenge for maintaining the welfare system we have. But I think the overwhelming position here is that we want to.
    – There is even the slightest justification for retaining a German state in its present form.
    I am not sure if this is a rhetoric question. The justification for retaining the Federal Republic of Germany is that there are about 80 Million German citizens living in the nation’s territory. Safe for a few lunatics (google Reichsbürgerbewegung), they all generally are in favor of keeping the state as it is. And for the foreseeable future, that’s not going to change.

    *If your’re wondering, I am Swiss but have been living in Germany all my life.

    Reply
    • Panzer

      Speaking as somebody who speaks German and lived in Dresden in 2015 when the ‘Monntag demos’ began and created Pegida and the Afd, I take issue with the first of your assertions.
      It’s quite dishonest of you to compare the migration happening now with the migration of the ‘gastarbeiter’ during the ‘wirtschaftswunder’ in the 50’s and 60’s. Yes the latter was poorly conceived, and left a minority population in Germany that has still quite not assimilated, however it was still somewhat planned and structured and met a very real need in Germany for labour at the time. The current situation is an unmanageable flood of unskilled ‘economic migrants’ from the near east and north africa who can’t really be assimilated (and don’t really want to be) that was let in on an emotional whim without regard for the long term consequences. The migration of the 50’s – 60’s and now are not comparable.

      As for your second point, I haven’t seen much evidence against the idea that new migrants will happily pay for the future benefits of the natives, but I think it’s clear as Jack says, that in the future the new migrants will use their demographic weight to rewrite the rule book – why wouldn’t they? As I said, the Turks still haven’t fully assimilated after 50 years, so there’s no reason why the newcomers somehow will.

      Reply

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