Spotter’s Guide To The Winter 2017 Hagerty Magazine

In this quarter’s issue of Hagerty Magazine, I’m taking you eastbound and down in a restored ’77 Bandit Trans Am. Check out the photography from Dave “Puppyknuckles” Burnett — you might even see the Horween Cordovan strap of my Weiss American Issue Field Watch!

It’s not available online yet, but I’ll put it up when it is. As always, thank you for reading!

23 Replies to “Spotter’s Guide To The Winter 2017 Hagerty Magazine”

  1. PaulyG

    Just got my hard copy in the mail today. You did not mention that they significantly upgraded the magazine with more content per issue and more issues per year. I love this magazine, it is like stepping in a pair of comfortable high quality shoes.

    And I am happy to see the BUY signal on the 996TT in the Bull Market List. 83,000 flawless miles since new with the only expenses being fluids and tires. Maybe not as much fun as my ’89 3.2 on a winding road on a fall day but way more usable.

    Reply
    • viper32cm

      I recall the 996 Turbo first getting the buy recommendation in early 2015 by a then (or recently former) Vice President of Hagerty. It was a compelling thought at the time, and I think the prices have been on a slight uptick since at least then. I really wanted a 996 Turbo or an air-cooled for the longest time, but I wound up deciding to buy a Z4 M Coupe instead. I’ve enjoyed the hell out of my Z4M thus far, which is what really matters. Still, I would like to get a 911 a one point, especially since my wife bought me half-a-dozen books on Porsche before I made my decision.

      Reply
        • viper32cm

          LOL, actually, she wanted an MGA. I was open to it (1600 MkII, please), especially since the MG TC has been on my wish list since elementary school, but, with limited garage space, an MG of that vintage was not a good idea for a third car.

          Reply
      • silentsod

        996TT has a motor that won’t grenade on you (well, the IMSB won’t) and the same crappy interior that a 996 has (I have an ’03 with an explodey motor, it’s crappy on the inside and this is the “improved” interior).

        Doing it again, I could have purchased an equivalent mileage TT for not much more money and that would have been more fun, less worry, and a better resale :\

        At least I got the manual transmission…

        Reply
        • PaulyG

          It is not THAT bad. While my ’03 TT’s dash is simple compared to the 997/998’s, it is serviceable. The only thing missing is an ability to integrate bluetooth for the phone due to the oddball Becker audio system. I got the upgraded leather on the seats which are damn comfortable and are worth seeking out if you are shopping for one of these.

          Compared to the interior in my ’89 3.2 interior, it is luxurious. And unlike the ’89, the heat does not boil me alive and the AC actually cools the interior.

          Exteriorwise, I think the 996TT is a lot more subtle than the later iterations that scream “I spent a shitload of money, look at me!”

          Finally, the engine is very strong. I know plenty of owners who reliably put out 600hp to the wheels. Probably not possible with the later non-Mezger engines (997.2 onward).

          Reply
          • silentsod

            I have a ’78 as well and yes the interior in the ’03 is miles better.

            It is not what I would expect from a car that retailed at $90k in 2003, though! Compared to, say, an Audi of the same vintage the Audi has a much nicer interior for ~1/2 the cost even if it is a different car in terms of mission. Mine has the cheap seats and they are terrible to sit in; used seats that are good go for $3-4k (per pair) so it is highly unlikely I will be spending money on those.

            My old man has an ’07 Turbo manual and that thing is wicked to drive, PO put some TechArt stuff on it plus a tune so it’s putting out around 500HP on the good ol’ Mezger case.

          • silentsod

            For the 996 interior the cupholders are fragile and a replacement unit is $400 (some parts are very reasonable, others are $400 over engineered and fragile cupholders). The ashtray thing in the middle refuses to stay closed because part of the plastic stop sheared and those are something like $150 (again, chintzy cost cutting crap), the materials are at least soft touch plastics in most places that you make contact with but again it screams of cost cutting elsewhere. Door handle springs break and require removing the entire door panel to replace (see also glovebox spring)… The e-brake’s button also had a small amount of material shear off and those are stupid expensive to replace (they don’t sell just the button).

            I sound like I hate the car but it’s actually decent and fairly engaging to drive.

          • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

            The CRAPPY ashtray was in my 2004 Boxster 550 as well… with the additional annoyance of it being painted GT Silver and therefore being fundamentally impossible to replace.

          • PaulyG

            Wow, sorry to hear that. None of that has happened in my car. And I agree, there appears to be no logic behind the pricing of replacement parts.

  2. Stephen

    Jack,

    I was at the wrong impressionable age when Smoky and Bandit came out. I have wanted a black Trans Am ever since. Wish I had snapped one up in the early 80’s when they were dirt cheap. I even know how I build it, except for the motor. Depending upon the day, either a LS or a built big block, overdrive manual.

    I agree with you about driving them. His Trans Am is light years ahead of my Falcon which I drive most days in the summer and fall. We are probably the last or second to last owners of these cars. Nobody is going to want them after we are finished

    –Stephen

    Reply
  3. Jeff Zekas

    Hey, Jack, kinda off the subject, but since you are an opinionated Porsche guy, I have a question: what do you think about the controversy surrounding youtube celebrity Matt Farah cutting up a classic Porsche? Is it “my money and I can do what I want, and you can all f*ck off”. Or is there a moral argument to be made, that owners of classics are caretakers and should preserve old cars? Is an old Porsche just an old car, a tool, that can be used and disposed of, however the owner wants? Or is there a moral or ethical dimension to owning a classic vehicle; a responsibility towards old cars, to care and love a vehicle that becomes more rare and more valuable with each passing day? Your wisdom would be appreciated.

    Reply
    • silentsod

      I’m not Jack but I also have an air-cooled Porsche 911: it’s a hunk of metal and he bought it, he can do whatever the hell he wants with it. The cars are not guaranteed to become more valuable (rare, yes) over time. Take a look at what other classic car scenes do over time; they stop being valuable when the people who wanted them as kids or young adults die and there’s no nostalgia for them in newer generations. I suspect the air-cooled Porsches will hold value for longer than others because they were produced as just about the same car from the 1960s to the mid 1990s but they, too, will fall out of favor.

      There should be no controversy and people should mind their own business.

      Reply
      • Jeff Zekas

        this was my reply on the Redit threat regarding this topic: “I’m amazed that Matt had to resort to name calling in his response (“f*ck right on off”). I had a roommate back at university, who was a lot like Matt. He owned an original Porsche Speedster… THE original Speedster, like the ones that sell for big bucks at auction. To my roomie, it was “just an old car”: he got drunk, crashed it, got drunk again, smashed it. Back in those days, Speedsters– and 356 Porsches– were common cars. Of course, times change. And in hindsight, it wasn’t “just an old car” but a piece of history. Some of us see ourselves as caretakers of historic vehicles, others just see an old car as a tool, to be used up, and thrown away. Guess it’s just a matter of getting older, and having more perspective.”

        Reply
        • silentsod

          There’s no name calling in saying “fuck right on off” and saying that it is name calling is doing a disservice to the English language. He didn’t call his detractors stupid fuckers, for instance.

          Reply
    • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

      I wish he wouldn’t, honestly. I think that’s a valuable car as it sits.

      My opinion is that people who really want to butcher a car up should start with a new one because they’re not taking a classic car out of the market in doing so.

      Reply
      • silentsod

        Do you feel the same about Singer and other restomods performed on these cars (admittedly his is sharp and not a resto but the mod part applies)?

        Reply
        • Jeff Zekas

          Not Jack, but to continue: another Redit user inherited a classic Porsche from his dad, and wanted to mod it, but didn’t, only due to lack of money. This user supported Matt Farah’s cutting up of a classic Porsche, and said folks who leave classic cars stock are “boring”. My response to him was the following: “You may feel differently, when you get older… i shared your opinion when i was 18, and had numerous modified cars. Now, i am sixty-three, and all the cars we modded have disappeared… literally… extinct… growing up in the 60’s, you could pick up a Porsche 356 or a Shelby Cobra or an old Ferrari for pennies on the dollar, so many of these car were “improved” or destroyed by their owners… nowadays, of course, NO ONE would modify a classic Ferrari or Lambo… they’d sell it for big bucks at auction. Btw driving an old car, or an old truck, is only “boring” if you lack imagination… for me, it’s the memories i share, driving the ’64 Chevy with my son, or street racing in my buddy’s Alfa, that makes a car special… just my two cents… peace…”

          Reply
          • silentsod

            As I said in my post, I hold that classic car values are tied primarily to nostalgia and if I were to take a guess the majority of people driving the values up are the people who are old enough to have had that nostalgia and now have money to finally buy that car they lusted after when they were young. I am half your age and I have no desire to own an Shelby Cobra, 356, or an old Ferrari (Ferrari for me starts with Magnum PI’s 308 and the prime nostalgic Ferrari for me is a 360 Modena and it has nothing to do with whether or not the machine is of any historical value to anyone down the line, I just thought they were super cool as a kid).

            You are explicitly saying you experience nostalgia at the end of your post and that is what makes the car special. The old cars you’re in are special to you because of the memories, not even the cars themselves! If the memories of modding and driving a car are what make it special to Farah or that other poster than what does it matter to you what they do with it if you are both going after the same end?

            There are still preserved Shelbys, 356s and Ferraris despite extremely low production numbers; Farah has one of ~13k produced ’87 911s so its loss as a museum piece is likely not a big deal.

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