Weekly Roundup: A Petting Zoo With Wings Edition

It used to be part of the suburban pilgrim’s progress: you got a house, you had a child, then you got a dog for the child. My parents did it, my friends’ parents did it. Every kid wanted a dog.

Things are different now. Grown men and women get dogs for themselves, often because they want a child but they would rather have something that can be put down or given up for adoption if times get tough. Dogs are children now. They ride in strollers and they eat gluten-free health food from specialized boutiques.

Naturally, these dogs have to go everywhere with their owners. They pad around on shit-stained paws in restaurants, they bark at you on the street, they attack cyclists. They get about the same level of discipline that the Millennials got, with similar results. And of course they have to get on planes. After all, you can bring children on planes. Why shouldn’t you be able to bring dogs, which are children now, on planes? Further more, why shouldn’t you receive special treatment for having done so, even though the whole thing is a scam?

This week, a fake child and a real child had an incident on a Southwest Airlines flight. The dog attacked the child and scraped her face. There’s a photo of the dog and its owner in the linked article. Experienced Southwest customers will recognize that these two bitches are sitting in the bulkhead seat, which is almost always a sign that they “pre-boarded” due to a medical condition. In my experience, 50% of Southwest pre-boarders do it because they are fat. Another 25% are old people on the way to Las Vegas. The final 25% consists of scammers and scumbags, which I think is the case here. She brings the dog as a “comfort animal” and then she insists on boarding first, with her dog.

After the dog attacked the six-year-old girl, both it and the owner were removed from the flight. That’s great, but I’m of the opinion that attacking a child should be a one-strike activity for animals. You hurt a child, you are going to die. Simple as that. Because children are actually human beings. We need children in order to continue the American nation and the human race. Dogs are not people. They are disposable. I’m not saying that to be cruel. I’ve owned dogs and cats. I can be very sentimental about animals, trust me. But animals are not people. Our national fetishization of animals over real children is having real and measurable effects on humanity.

Actually, scratch that. Let the dog live, maybe on one of those farms I always heard about as a kid. Shoot the woman in the head. In public, pour encourager les autres. Comfort animal. My ass.


For R&T, I talked about how we program ourselves to drive poorly.

At TTAC, I told a story about potholes and forced my son to test drive the BIRD scooter around Santa Monica.

Brother Bark took a swipe at the Mercedes-Benz CLA250.

Alright, everybody, fly safe and I’ll see you soon!

68 Replies to “Weekly Roundup: A Petting Zoo With Wings Edition”

  1. silentsod

    I was surprised to see it was a medium-large dog, was straight up expecting some small breed thing.

    It wouldn’t cross my mind to take either of my dogs on a plane (because they’re 75 and 90 pounds and a breed that can make some people uncomfortable). I agree that human lives and well being should always take priority over animals. The thinking of “well, we’re all just animals!” and destruction of human exceptionalism is something which concerns me because it seems to me that there’s a clear discrepancy between the potentiality of a human and the potentiality of a dog/cat/cow/giraffe/etc.

    Reply
      • Ronnie Schreiber

        As I’ve mentoned before, my late father was a veterinarian. He routinely muzzled dogs when doing examinations. Dogs have limited means of reacting to provoked pain. It usually involves snapping and biting.

        Clients (that’s what they called pet owners back then, and if anyone back then had been dense enough to call an animal their “fur baby”, he would have explained to them the difference between humans and animals – Dad didn’t suffer fools gladly) would tell him as he’d muzzle a dog, “Doctor, he/she doesn’t bite. That’s not necessary.”

        He’d reply. “My hands are my livelihood. There’s no such thing as a dog that won’t bite. If you provoke it enough, every dog will bite. That’s what dogs do.”

        Reply
  2. Pat

    My first time on a track was ~30 years after getting my DL and it took me until the last lap I had before I even understood that I was braking all wrong. So much time practicing being smooth and road-safe and braking almost imperceptibly and I found myself extremely slow in the one place I should have been anything but.

    Reply
  3. rich

    True. I lived in one of these new apartments in downtown Chicago a few years back. Just about every one of the ironic bearded hipsters sharing the building with me had a freaking dog.

    Reply
  4. Bigtruckseriesreview

    I used to have pets. I don’t bother anymore. Expensive, stink up the house. Unpredictable – and I like to leave expensive things laying around – I don’t want chewed up.

    rather than leave the dog outside all the time – except winter, I prefer to keep no pet.

    Reply
  5. scotten

    Even when I don’t agree with you, Jack, I enjoy reading your work. But in this case, take that fat b*tch out back and shoot her.

    I see way too many people taking dogs where they’re not needed. Kudos to the airlines that are allegedly locking this down.

    Reply
  6. Duong Ngyuen

    I knew humanity was screwed when I saw there were Mother’s Day cards from dogs (aka “fur babies”) at the store.

    Reply
    • everybodyhatesscott

      Seriously. I have a dog. I like my dog but he is not my baby. It bothers me even more when people date for 5 years, get married and decide they want a furbaby. You just got married and are 31 years old. Maybe it’s time for a real baby. But going around and showing pictures of your “child” sending christmas cards out with your “child” is all a bit pathetic. And I have to bottle all these feelings up in real life because I’m in an evironment that thinks I’m the crazy one for thinking dogs are just animals. I would also not spend my life savings on my dog to save it. If he gets cancer, I will do my best to keep him out of pain but I’m not paying 15k for doggy chemo.

      Reply
      • Ronnie Schreiber

        God bless the people who spend a lot of money on veterinary care. They fed me growing up, as my late father was a veterinarian. That being said, I have no patienced for people who equate pets with children, animals with human beings.

        Reply
  7. Dirty Dingus McGee

    “She brings the dog as a “comfort animal” and then she insists on boarding first, with her dog.”

    According to the linked article, it was a HE that brought the hound on the plane. Being as I’m too lazy to bust out the Google and check for other articles, I’ll just guess the article was wrong.

    I fly Southwest. A lot. A list Plus for the last 3 years, usually boarding number is A1, never worse than A5. I don’t give a damn where you’re flying to, there are at least 4 wimmen dragging their little Pookie on, with it’s $20 red “ESA” vest. Sometimes puddy tats too. I’ve yet to see a duck, but figured it would just be a matter of time. I have been on other airlines when Southwest doesn’t have a flight, or one that I want, going to certain cities and they weren’t any better. It’s been getting to the point that It was like being on a bus in Central America. I’ve been waiting for the goats, pigs, and sheep to be boarding with me.

    I can’t wait for the day when I get to give up this form of travel. If I can work it out logistically, I prefer to take my bike. Sadly, anything west of Dallas usually precludes being able to do that, and onto the “tube of germs” I go.

    Reply
    • stingray65

      As a dog lover and owner, I agree 100% with Jack. Two issues are driving the pet thing: 1) it has become too cheap to fly so all matter of riffraff (e.g. mentally ill, ill-mannered, ill-smelling, morbidly fat, and terrorists) take the plane instead of driving or just staying home, and with tickets so cheap they can afford to bring the pet along also (and/or screaming ill-mannered infants and toddlers). 2) too many people are too socially isolated, so they become mentally dependent on the pet for “support”, and practically speaking they don’t have friends and family to take care of the pet while they travel – whether pet ownership increases isolation because they prefer the pet to people, or they get a pet because they are socially isolated is an interesting question. Unless it is a true service animal, pets should NOT be on planes, and if you care about your pet you shouldn’t want it on the plane (too much stress on the animal from exposure to riffraff people).

      Reply
      • Dirty Dingus McGee

        That woman should be banned from flying forever. Greyhound is still in business for folks are dense as her.

        Reply
        • -Nate

          Hopefully Jack/Mark will some day create an article about ‘Riding The Hound’ in America, I know there will be many hilarious/tragic/insightful comments made, just remember to begin each one with ‘a Guy I know once told me that…..’ to protect the guilty parties .

          Riding the buses in Centro America in the 1970’s was an eye opener even for me .

          -Nate

          Reply
  8. John C.

    On the CLA, I wonder if the fakeness would go away if they offered a diesel and just called it a 240D. The performance and smoothness would drop even lower but there was a time when 80% of buyers would agree to give up anything for an efficient MB emblem. Real authenticity and heritage!

    Reply
    • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

      I think the problem was that the 240D was just the de-contented version of the regular Benz, so it was the opposite of this thing.

      There will still be 240Ds crawling around this planet when the last CLA becomes a Chinese refrigerator.

      Reply
      • -Nate

        Count on this ! =8-) .

        I took my just rebuilt 363,000 + mile 240D to a high end car show in Rolling Hills Estates this morning, it was requested by the Promoter and it has another request for a local M-B Clubs show and shine this afternoon .

        _not_ a show car by any means but it’s decent for 34 years old .

        -Nate

        Reply
        • John C.

          It is great that you take such good care of it and have been rewarded with such a long life. My point is that the durability of at least the diesels is one thing that MB still gets right, Rather than competing as lease specials, a car that will last will be around a lot longer. Even if to the restaurant oil people. They would have no interest in the CLA 250 as is.

          Reply
          • -Nate

            PM with pic sent as I know not how to include pictures here, post/share it as you wish .

            Nothing special, this is just one more old Mercedes beater no matter how much I like it ~ 57 HP IIRC means it’s glacially slow anywhere it goes .

            When new it didn’t have a radio or passenger side mirror ~ only option was a slushbox tranny .

            Prepare to be seriously underwhelmed .

            -Nate

        • totitan

          I love diesels and I have two BMW M57’s which are arguably one of the finest automotive diesel engines ever built. One of them is in a 335d and the other is in a X5 35d. 265 horsepower and 425 foot pounds at 1700 RPM and 35 MPG on the highway is hugely fun to drive, especially in a 3 Series. BMWs line of diesel engines are almost never written about in fact most people in the United States don’t even realize that BMW makes diesel engines.

          Reply
  9. ltrftc

    Jack,
    My problem with track braking is that in a effort brake hard I hit the brake too hard and unsettle the car. In the ride alongs I’ve done with the pros I’ve noticed that they brake hard, but the transition off the gas onto the brake is much smoother, the lateral movement of the nose if far less dramatic.

    Do you have any thoughts on this? Cheers.

    Reply
    • stingray65

      I’m no expert so I hope the experts (Jack) will correct what follows as necessary, but I have seen videos of Jackie Stewart teaching performance driving, and he stresses smoothness in transitions between gas and brake pedals, steering inputs and pedal inputs, etc. as the fast way around the track. I expect it is difficult to master and requires practice, because when driving fast I think the tendency for most people is too panic a bit when a corner is coming up fast, or the car starts to drift more than expected, or the brakes lock up, etc. and then react violently to the controls, which can further upset the car. Thus to be a fast driver you need to learn how to “relax when fast” so that you can react quickly AND smoothly in such transitions.

      I’ve often wondered if such smoothness is also what separates the fast racers that tend to finish races and the fast racers that tend to break cars. Jimmy Clark was supposedly an extremely smooth racer, and post-race examination of his tires and brake pads apparently revealed far less wear and abuse than his team-mate’s vehicles (who almost always finished behind him). Phil Hill was another driver who was fast, but also “easy” on his cars and more often than not finished races. On the other hand, I also wonder if the Andretti “curse” of having cars fail during races wasn’t due to some “roughness” in treating the cars to get that last .00001 second faster. Of course such differences are more trivial today, since race cars seem to have almost bulletproof reliability, and tires are changed many times during the race (F1 racers used to go multiple races on the same set of tires).

      Reply
    • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

      I have to repeat the whole “squeeze on, ease off” to myself sometimes. In any car with power brakes, try using the minimum force necessary for max braking.

      Reply
  10. Ronnie Schreiber

    When Cadillac factory team driver Johnny O’Connell took me around the Belle Isle course in an ATS-V at a press event what was most dramatically different from street driving was the braking: very late and very hard.

    Reply
  11. Ronnie Schreiber

    You hurt a child, you are going to die.

    That’s not always fair to the animal. Children need to learn to treat animals humanely.

    My ex had a beloved calico cat named Edna. We knew we were going to have kids so we didn’t have her declawed (my dad was a veterinarian so it could have been done easily) because we didn’t want the cat to be defenseless against small kids. Once, our youngest was about two or three and she climbed up onto the couch and took a swipe at Edna, and Edna swatted her to get away. It was defensive, not aggressive, but reflexively her claws were extended and she managed to catch Tova high on her cheek, with a claw digging in very close to her eye. Child and cat both proceeded to freak out and I had to quickly dive in, grab the paw in a way to force the claw to retract and carefully extract it from my daughter’s face.

    Reply
    • yamahog

      There should be different rules for cats and dogs -though maybe the right way to write the rules is around the weight of the animal.

      Though also the ratio of aggressive dogs to aggressive cats seems to approach infinity.

      Reply
    • George Denzinger (geozinger)

      “That’s not always fair to the animal. Children need to learn to treat animals humanely.”

      This is true. I have a 13 year old miniature Dachshund, Elli, who is dealing with arthritis and other old mammal issues. She’s been known to nip when excited, but she’s not aggressive, maybe a little skittish though. However, I do not let random people approach my any of my dogs without a warning. (I have two other minis, both are younger, in better health and more friendly than Elli.) Here’s why: In previous times, children and even adults have walked right up to my dog(s) got in their face and tried to pet, hug or even kiss them. I usually respond by either picking up my dogs immediately or if I can’t react fast enough, jerking them away from the offender. I figure it’s better if I injure my own dog rather than some toddler getting injured by my dog. Granted, my dogs are, at most, 10 to 15 pounds, but to a 40 pound child, that’s a good sized animal.

      Folks have got to teach their kids that animals (of any kind) ARE NOT PLUSH TOYS! You cannot run up to them (sometimes) squealing or screaming and expect the animal to remain calm. Hell, you can’t even do that to me and I’m a full-grown adult! ALWAYS get permission from the owner to approach the dog.

      I don’t support blanket statements that all animals who bite humans should be put down immediately. People do some really stupid shit around animals and then are offended or frightened when the animal reacts. They’re not stuffed animals for your entertainment. Treat them like the potential threat they are.

      Reply
      • silentsod

        People, I find, are the worst with animals. Either the dog owners themselves are mishandling their animals (too much slack on leash, letting the dog lead, not keeping the animal under control forcefully if need be) or people approaching animals are doing so blithely. Case in point: my physically larger dog will retreat from small children because, when he was a puppy, a little girl approached him while he was with my wife and that kid then started screaming which scared the shit out of him. The parents of that child were right there and didn’t immediately remove her from the scene. As a result he is leery of all toddlers (babies he’s been around without issue but he is carefully watched for signs of stress or aggression). People see a dog and they usually think happy & friendly. They don’t seem to read the dog’s demeanor, even with GSD that have reputations as being protective and aggressive dogs.

        I also know a fear-aggressive GSD (he loves me now but initially he did want to kill me) and the owner has to physically pick up the dog and carry him away because people don’t listen when he says that he’s not a friendly dog. Trust me, it’s obvious he’s not friendly because he gives warning growls, raises his hackles, bares his teeth, and is wearing a muzzle! People still see a fuzzy dog and want to touch him.

        Reply
  12. hank chinaski

    Next it will be a pit bull rescue, which will eat a stew’s head.
    Save the bullet. The door in the back opens, just do it before you break atmo.

    Regarding webcomics, and I’ve never read that one, but I also suggest perrybiblefellowship.

    Reply
  13. Spud Boy

    Adam Carolla has been ranting about dogs on planes for years. There’s a funny scene about this in his movie “Road Hard.”

    The fact is, these days domestic air travel is a cluster fuck. TSA is about as polite as the Wafen-SS; flight attendants are rude; the passengers include the dregs of society; computer reservation systems combined with frequent flyer programs ensure there will never be an empty seat on the plane; the list goes on and on.

    Fortunately, when I fly on business, it’s only to the far east, and only in business class–usually on an asian carrier. The flight attendants are young, hot, and fawn all over you. It’s a completely different experience than flying domestic in coach, or should I say “economy.”

    Reply
  14. ScottS

    Yes. Dogs are animals. Period. End of discussion. It’s only a matter of time until there is a very serious incident involving a dog on a commercial flight. No matter how much we anthropomorphize dogs, this does not alter the fact that dogs are carnivores and predators. I have been absolutely shocked to see pit bulldogs being boarded on airplanes with nothing more than a leash for control, and I honestly don’t know how I am going to react when the inevitable day comes that I am seated with one, or similar, as they say in the rental car business.

    This is a local (to me) news story that made national headlines recently. Some people are ardently defending the dogs and accusing the police and medical examiner of incompetence. I don’t ever go out walking or biking unarmed, and it isn’t generally people that I fear.
    http://www.foxnews.com/us/2018/02/23/autopsy-confirms-virginia-woman-22-mauled-to-death-by-her-own-dogs.html

    Reply
    • everybodyhatesscott

      Every Pitbull owner I know doesn’t believe her dogs did it. Owning pitbulls is insane but there’s a huge push to normalize that all dog breeds are the same. There’s only one race, the dog race.

      Reply
      • Ronnie Schreiber

        I have little patience for owners of aggressive breeds who brag about the animals’ genetic characteristics but get upset when you point out their gene for aggression. Enough about the dog genome is known today that, if someone wanted to, they could probably breed the perfect dog, just the right combination of companionability and aggression.

        Reply
  15. Jeff Zekas

    Jack, I started laughing whilst reading your article… RIGHT ON! But seriously, in most states, if a dog attacks LIVESTOCK then the dog can be shot by the livestock owner… Do we value cows more than kids? Btw, I like dogs, and I like kids, but humans always come first. What pisses me off, is being at the park, with the “well mannered dogs” running off leash, attacking bike riders and other dogs. In my experience, except for trained police dogs, there are very few “well mannered” dogs out there.

    Reply
  16. -Nate

    RE: dogs ~ holy crap ! .

    I remember one Woman I dated who was sort of like this, she’s beautiful and talented but very needy and has these tiny little dogs she cuddles and _SLEEPS_WITH_ ~ it tried to get into bed with us when we were getting busy, I forcibly removed it .

    I have two little junkyard dogs, they’re not cutsey-poo, they’re working dogs who keep the riff raff, cats and squirrels out of my yard .

    Yes, they comfort me after a long hard day by _occasionally_ being allowed to sleep on my lap in my recliner but THEY’RE FREAKING DOGS F’CHRISSAKES and they’re supposed to sleep out side in all weather .

    I bought them a dogloo and added a carpet for when it’s close to freezing, or to wet . they never complain .

    BTW : I began calling Southwest Airlines “Cattle Car Air” in the 1970’s and stopped using them by the early 1990’s ~ I can ride the Ghetto Bus at the end of my block and it’s far cheaper .

    -Nate

    Reply
    • Dirty Dingus McGee

      They are ALL cattle cars these days, no matter the airline, or the plane. Only difference between a 737 and an A300 is the name. Unless you pony up for business class or first class (Southwest has neither), personal space is at a minimum. Southwest is no longer the bottom of the barrel that they once were, that would be Spirit, Frontier, etc. I use Southwest for the most part due to being able to check 2 bags for free, plus being able to change my flight at no cost (Business Select). Other airlines are about $75, per bag, and $100 plus to change your flight. When you’re the one paying for the ticket, things like that make a difference. Yes, Southwest hands out tiny peanut packs (I think there are 14 peanuts in the package), ditto the pretzels. On longer flights you might get a package of crackers, or a 1oz bag of Fritos. I figure if I can’t go 1-5 hours without stuffing grub in my face then I have a problem, totally unrelated to being on a bus with wings.

      Reply
      • -Nate

        A sad thing to be sure .

        I have no idea why anyone would ever be afraid, as you said it’s just unpleasant .

        Wasn’t like this way back when, I remember flying on a turboprop jet in the cheap seats and it was comfy and had passable food .

        I’ve not flown since 2013 (IIRC) I got screwed in Boston and they told me the only available non stop home was 1st. class and left in one hour, it was (of course) pouring rain so I ponied up and had a wonderful flight home, it must be very nice to be rich .

        I prefer ground travel anyways, slower yes but always new people to meet and things to see……..

        RE: the Ghetto Bus, in Dorchester, Ma. (pronounced :DAWchestah if you live there) I wasn’t surprised to see a Haitian Woman bring a live turkey aboard as we drove Dot. Av…….

        Local buses are always interesting and rarely cold in inclement weather .

        They serve to remind the more astute Americans that whatever ‘hood they live in is prolly better than everyone else on that bus’s .

        -Nate

        Reply
        • Dirty Dingus McGee

          Any bus, be they local or national, will contain an “interesting” mix of characters. I once had to “catch the dog” from Panama City Fl to Atlanta, IIRC January 1981. A trip that I had made by bike or car in 5 hours, took close to 9 by bus. Then the local mass transit to get me out to the suburbs where I lived at the time. Both of those rides strengthened my resolve to keep my vehicles in top operating condition.

          Yeah, flying sucks. Sadly, I have to do it for my work. If I need to get somewhere to work up a quote for a company, I usually don’t have the luxury to travel by my personal vehicle. Once it’s 400 miles away, I can’t justify the extra time involved. I have someone I’m training to be able to that, so maybe later this year I can pick and choose a bit more my method of travel.

          And BTW; I spent a few years living in Rhode Island, so I’m familiar with “pahk the cah in the yahd”, getting some “lobsta” and going to the “packy” so you can have a “wicked pissa of a benda”. Luckily I only lived there for 4 years,, so it didn’t take me long to remember how to talk. 🙂

          Reply
          • -Nate

            The funny thing is : I tended to absorb dialects from whom ever was around me so by age 14 when I was banished to the West Coast and beginning to have a real interest in “goils”, I barely spoke decent English .

            The California girls laughed when I talked to I say my sorry assed self down and worked hard (not ‘hahd’) at eradicating the more egregious gaffes I used daily .

            For decades, every time I went back to visit I’d grab a Boston Globe newspaper and have my Niece read it to me , she’s now in her late 40’s and an RN for the Olympics, has no time to waste on her foolish old eccentric Uncle’s folderol .

            BTW: there _IS_ a clear Southern California ‘accent’ ~ (or used to be) : it’s properly speaking clear English and no locals will ever admit it .

            -Nate

      • totitan

        I love Southwest because you always know exactly what you’re going to get. I don’t think that can be said about any other Airline

        Reply
  17. Tom KlockauTom Klockau

    Crap like this makes me glad that the last time I was on an aircraft was January 2006. I have no fear of flying; I just hate it.

    Reply
    • Kevin Jaeger

      That’s my attitude, too. I used to enjoy flying but now I just hate the entire process. I’ll drive two days rather than fly if I have to.

      Reply
    • George Denzinger (geozinger)

      I haven’t flown much since before 9/11, and maybe a couple times in the intervening 17 years. Up until about 2005-6, my wife had to fly for work and the process, like Kevin mentioned, is just awful. She’s rather full bodied (not bragging, just sayin’), and it seemed like every time she had to fly somewhere, she was one of the people who always was sidelined to get an enhanced search. She used to joke about the pre-flight foreplay, but it really did p!ss her off.

      I flew for the first time in several years in November of 2016 from Denver to Detroit. What a thrill that was. Not. I had to go through the new screening thing where you hold up your arms in the booth. That was fun. Plus taking off my shoes only reinforces my opinion that they (the TSA) is more interested in making it look like they’re doing something rather than just collecting a paycheck…

      Reply
  18. rwb

    I happened to check your IG, are you trying dirt oval now? You have an open invite to the ice next winter, my car should handle better. Also, looks like secret pizza…

    Good thoughts on consciously switching models for different driving styles. At the one Ross Bentley seminar I attended, he spoke of consciously setting your mind and using phrases to force the switch; I’ve been telling myself “Drive stupid” ever since.

    Reply
  19. Tyguy

    While I agree the “emotional support animal” loophole has been abused, this doesn’t sound like a vicious attack. The kid approached the animal after being told not too, the result was a very minor scrape on the forehead. People do need to control their kids and teach them it is not ok to approach other peoples pets without care and the ok from the owners.

    I spent $450 to fly my 30lb dog from Denver to Newark on United. When dropped of the dog, the cargo people thought I was crazy for not just making her an emotional support animal. With having to drop the dog off in air cargo, 4 hours before the flight, and not getting her back for another 4 after it landed, I understood why nobody wants to fly an animal cargo anymore. In the 90’s my parents used to commute between Florida and New Jersey with their 40lb dog in Cargo. It was about $100 each way. It was super easy, just needed a proper carrier and Vet paperwork. About as normal as flying golf clubs, not anymore.

    Reply
  20. George Denzinger (geozinger)

    I have to add one more thought to all of this. I have a friend whose teenage daughter is a Type I diabetic. Her diabetes is particularly bad, so the parents invested in a service dog that can actually determine when this child’s blood sugar level is out of whack. It actually will key on my blood sugar level also, when I’m in the vicinity of the dog and my blood sugar is too high or low. So, this is absolutely no joke, a real life-saving work animal.

    My friends are very diligent about never taking the animal out in public without it’s service animal vest on, they had it especially trained to respond to non-family members only when a family member can signal the dog to be approached by strangers (It’s a black lab, EVERYONE wants to pet the dog). Obviously, they keep the dog on a short leash and due to the family’s concerns, the daughter isn’t allowed to take the dog into every establishment. For example, if they’re going to an event that there will be lots of people or stimulation, the dog gets a muzzle.

    Contrast this with a recent visit I had at a local chain home improvement store. I was walking down the lumber aisle, looked up and saw a young adult man walking a pit bull on a leash the opposite way from me. No vest, no leash, no positive identification that this was any kind of working dog. I gave them both a wide berth, as I had no idea what I was encountering.

    This is seriously screwed up. Real service dogs and their owners go through rigorous training and change their lifestyles to accommodate this animal, but these other @$$hats can just walk around with a potentially dangerous animal and skate on all of the obligations that having a service animal implies.

    This shit has got to stop.

    Reply
    • George Denzinger (geozinger)

      Heh, I came back to see this article again and see I made a typo. This sentence: “No vest, no leash, no positive identification that this was any kind of working dog…” should read: No vest, no leash TAGS, no positive identification… There are tags or flags you can put on your dog’s leash to indicate to strangers how friendly the dog may be.

      Reply
  21. Ronnie Schreiber

    I’ve been a financial supporter of Leader Dogs for the Blind and have visited their training facility north of Detroit. I also know someone who does the real world training that Leader Dogs get in between initial training at the facility and being assigned to someone who is visually impaired.

    Comparing those dogs, with their training and dispositions, to “emotional support animals” is ludicrous. What did these people do when traveling before someone decided to broaden the concept of a service animal to include an infantilized adult’s imitation of an infant.

    Reply
  22. Booty_Toucher

    “In my experience, 50% of Southwest pre-boarders do it because they are fat. Another 25% are old people on the way to Las Vegas. The final 25% consists of scammers and scumbags, which I think is the case here.”

    I hate Southwest’s boarding policy. I have a legitimate medical need to have an aisle seat, and won’t book tickets AT ALL unless I can get that aisle. Unfortunately, sometimes Southwest is the only reasonable option, and I’m forced to board early. Even if you log in as early as possible, the first boarding numbers always go to folks with status or those who have upgraded, and you’re never guaranteed an aisle seat.

    Although I’m more in-tune to “invisible” disabilities than most, it’s still my observation that Jack’s % breakdown here is more-or-less true. As a 6′ tall 175 lb able bodied youngish person, I’m sure folks think I’m some kind of scammer. Oh well.

    Reply
  23. JustPassinThru

    Dogs as fake children.

    True enough, on the face of it; and it does go a long way towards explaining the fanatical obsession some people seem to have towards their dogs. It puts a whole new light on the insistence these days of owners to take their dogs with them, in the mall, in the supermarket, into restaurants.

    And as noted, fake kids can be surrendered, or dumped, or given to the dog pound to gas.

    And THAT is what made me think. These people are narcissistic to the point of psychosis. Most of them SHOULD NOT have kids. They abuse their dogs; they don’t discipline their dogs; their dogs are pests and menaces – as the story demonstrates.

    But those feral, untrained dogs have no consequence. Undisciplined CHILDREN, have REAL consequences – as we’re seeing in Florida, as well as with other outrages committed in the past.

    Perhaps it’s better that the neurotic semi-rich obsess over their canine pretend-children.

    Reply
    • Danio

      “And THAT is what made me think. These people are narcissistic to the point of psychosis. Most of them SHOULD NOT have kids.”

      This made me think about the people I know who got dogs instead of children, and it’s exactly right.

      When my wife and I got married in our early twenties, instead of getting pets we got kids. Of course all our dog loving acquaintances keep asking when we’re getting a dog for the kids. Never. I don’t need another mouth to feed or ass to shit on the floor. Plus, we travel a lot and I’d rip my own dick off if I ever caught myself paying for “doggy daycare”. Of course, because I found a wife and got done having kids in my twenties in this generation, I’m already an outlier.

      Reply
      • -Nate

        Well Danio ;

        RE: kids early in life we’re in the same boat but both SWMBO & I are reasonably fond of my dick ……..

        My Son managed to talk his (thankfully long gone) Mother into a dog when he was about 9YO, guess who had to clean up after it ? .

        That’s right, his Grandmother who lived with us .

        Thankfully she also bathed that foul smelling little thing . some sort of wire hair terrier mix, because it was a mutt it never ever got sick and even managed to survive being fed chicken bones by said ex Wife and getting run over by an Oldsmobile, that shattered it’s hip and both back legs, I of course had to take it to the Vet after they let it sit in the yard in pain all day……

        When the In Laws left they took it with them, every time I’d visit that pup always remembered me and went batshit with joy when I opened the gate .

        After my Son was grown & gone I decided to get a dog and they’re nice to have *if* you plan ahead and figure out what typ of dog you want cluttering up the property and fertilizing the back lawn…..

        I like Pound Puppies, mutts because the goofy mix in breeding makes them healthier and longer lived .

        My Sire is 20 YO now ! wow .

        You alls would be shocked to see how badly some parents treated their own Children before they get in Foster care, one is preventing her Son from going to a good school where he’ll actually have a chance at life and she’s blocking every move tried to help this poor little boy even now .

        Grr……

        Why are so many afraid to stand up to these sub humans ? .

        -Nate

        Reply
        • stingray65

          In many localities you need a license to legally own a dog, and a license to legally give someone a haircut or manicure, and every civilized place requires a license to legally drive a car, but anyone with functioning sex organs can have a kid with no interference from the state. How many parents an prospective parents would pass a kid licensing test if it required they demonstrate they themselves are not addicted to drugs or mentally ill, can economically support the kid without welfare, make sure the kid gets a healthy diet, medical attention, and goes to school, is taught hygiene, manners and work ethic, and is not abused or mistreated. I expect the kid license pass rate might be depressingly low.

          Reply
          • -Nate

            A sobering thought I had in the 106’s just like you are now .

            If that was the case I’d not be here, my ‘rents had six plus adoptions and little idea of what to actually do .

            I made damn sure my Son knew he was loved and right from wrong along with basic Conservative values of hard word, thrift and honesty .

            Not surprisingly, he’s done far better than I have in life, we’re both happy and his Daughter is a delight .

            -Nate

          • -Nate

            Whoops ! . no coffee yet & can’t edit .

            1960’s .

            My Son knew right from wrong at an early age .

            No lying, _ever_ .

            -Nate

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