Diamonds Are Forever Worthless

Diamonds are for suckers. They always were. Thirty-five years ago, you could buy two books that explained, without the slightest bit of hyperbole or misdirection, how an absurdly secretive cartel and a cooperative mass media turned an easily-duplicated stone with primarily industrial worth into an indispensable signifier of middle-class success.

As fate would have it, I read one of those books right before getting engaged, and I took absolutely seriously. As a consequence, my first wife’s engagement ring was a quarter-carat pawn-shop special, just a bit under $250 after tax. To her credit, my bride didn’t complain too much, even as our friends and acquaintances went to the altar with a full carat or even the two-carat honker that a friend’s sister received from a construction worker in the midst of a boomtown year.

“The bigger the ring, the shorter the marriage,” I laughed, and I wasn’t wrong. I was also correct about just how worthless a used diamond ring is. By the time we officially divorced fifteen years later, some of our friends had already managed to buy, and sell, a second set of rings.

Right around then, my girlfriend of the time suggested out of nowhere that $15,000 would be a nice number for the engagement ring she expected me to put on her finger. “You have to be kidding,” I replied.

“But I’ve seen you spend that much on a guitar,” she snapped.

“Yeah, and I could sell that guitar for something more than a nickel on the dollar.” Alas, the engagement never came to pass. The current Mrs. Baruth wears an heirloom from a deceased relative on her left hand, while I rotate through an ad hoc collection of titanium and silicone rings designed to be lost in a set of gloves or at a skatepark without sorrow. I feel good about this. Diamond engagement rings are a scam.

Yet most Americans, if pressed, will admit that they believe at least somewhat in the value of a “natural” diamond. That belief is on the way to being utterly shattered.


The supply of diamonds has always exceeded the demand, but now that the deBeers monopoly has collapsed it is only a matter of time before most unexceptional stones become completely worthless. Accelerating this development: the Chinese ability to grow flawless diamonds in a lab.

The Chinese diamonds are reportedly so good that it takes equipment costing “tens of millions of dollars” to authenticate a “real” diamond beyond suspicion. (The diamond at the top of this article? Fake.) But wait, there’s more. Various hackers and maker-types have been creating diamonds in microwaves for some time now, and the secret is out. You could buy your future wife a diamond so close to perfect that no jewelry store or pawnshop in the world could discover the difference — or you could make your own diamond in a microwave and let her find out after your divorce.

Given how often I write about authenticity on this blog, you would perhaps expect me to defend the “real” diamond in these cases. Sorry. I can’t do it.

To begin with, a diamond is simply the process of heat and pressure applied to carbon. It’s not a piece of Brazilian Rosewood or even Michigan Maple. It’s not a living thing, it was never a living thing. It’s not even rare. Take the same carbon dust that makes your tires black instead of milky white. Put it in a microwave under certain circumstances. Boom. There’s a diamond.

Furthermore, the human story of a diamond is pretty horrifying no matter whether it’s a “conflict diamond” or a “blood diamond” or just a Russian diamond sitting under a million others just like it in a de Beers vault. People spend their lives digging underground for a tiny piece of carbon that could be made in a microwave. This has nothing to do with the kind of skilled labor and precision effort that is involved in a PRS Private Stock guitar or a Vacheron Constantin watch. It’s simply human misery, compressed and heated over the years until diamonds arrive. All of the human artistry in the diamond business happens after the fact, when the cutter gets it, and he can cut a fake diamond the same way he cuts a real one.

Last but not least, in order for a diamond to get from Africa to your girlfriend’s finger it has to pass through some of the most corrupt, sleazy, disgusting hands known to man, all of whom take a cut of the profits at your expense. If you want to know how much profit they get, simply try pawning your engagement ring. Then subtract what the pawnshop offers you from what you paid. That’s the margin.

There’s markup all through the jewelry business, of course. A while ago, I bought Danger Girl a pendant from Tiffany that probably cost three or four times what the equivalent weight in Credit Suisse gold bars would have been. The markup in the diamond biz, however, isn’t a 300% markup. It’s ten times that — or more. The finest two-carat raw diamond the world has to offer is worth about three grand on the wholesale market. How much does the diamond miner get for finding it? Under a dollar a day. Half of them are children.

It won’t happen all at once, but the diamond scam is bound to collapse eventually, along with the whole moronic engagement-ring industry on which it depends. That’s good news for virtually every human being on the planet. We shouldn’t have a society where women wear symbols of oppression and misery proudly on their fingers. They should just hold those symbols in their hands and look at them all the time, the same way everybody else who has an Apple iPhone By Foxconn’s Suicide Factory(tm) does. If diamonds truly are forever, then let them be forever forgotten.

82 Replies to “Diamonds Are Forever Worthless”

  1. rich

    Have you noticed that no matter how clearly you explain the above, and how accurate it is, women just don’t seem able to understand it ?

    I have had the above conversation with my wife on numerous occasions

    My local downtown has a “Pandora”. Their thing is, during nice weather they have a display case out in the street.

    My wife pointed out how nice that was and what it said about what a safe town we live in.

    I told her “what it says is, the contents are total junk and the company doesn’t care if someone throws the case in the trunk of their car. Do you think their insurance carrier would cover them if they left items worth anything at all in the street?”

    (Crickets)

    Reply
    • Rick T.

      As the famous philosopher AL Bundy said: “Women understand women….and they hate each other.” Glad I never made a friend in the diamond business. My wife wears an old gold wedding band from 1913 given to her by a widowed great aunt.

      Reply
  2. everybodyhatesscott

    I always figured a good litmus test for a bride is if she scoffs at the engagement right, she’s not worth marrying.

    Reply
      • everybodyhatesscott

        Nah. I’m too old for that. I know nothing about diamonds so substitute whatever is nice in here but if you get a girl a half carat that you think looks nice and instead of jumping in your arms in excitement that you proposed she’s upset that she didn’t get a carat engagement ring, run away and go find someone who wants to be with you, not someone who wants to be with the idea of a carat engagement ring.

        Reply
    • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

      Not intentional… but he primarily discusses what the idea of a ring means rather than the mechanics of it.

      Reply
      • David Walton

        I think that the *meaning* of the ring – conspicuous and meaningful material sacrifice – will contribute to the trend enduring despite the developments you note.

        Reply
  3. John C.

    I tend to agree that it is a scam, but you could say the same thing about gold including the alchemy.

    Luckily the scam is good enough to keep appraisals ahead of inflation. We had my wife’s engagement ring that I bought for $1800 appraised during a twentieth anniversary trip to Amsterdam a few years back. The appraisal was 8000 Euros. Not street value of course but turns a cost of marriage into an asset. The way things should work for good decisions over the long term.

    Reply
    • Will

      Gold has always been valuable since humans have existed. It is the cornerstone of currency. Everyone in the world understands gold and its value; it is no scam since it is universal.

      Reply
        • Will

          It’s valuable because it’s hard to mine, rare and isn’t everywhere. That’s an insipid comment. If you can’t understand why we value certain precious metals, then you do not understand human history or economics. Sorry.

          Reply
          • Eric H

            It’s just as insipid to think gold will always be valuable.

            I do understand the history of economics which is why my initial statement stands.

            Gold isn’t the rarest or hardest to smelt metal there is. It’s actually pretty easy to separate from the base ore.

            Gold is shiny, malleable, and doesn’t corrode. It’s why people of high status valued it so much and were willing trade actual useful metals (iron, copper, tin, lead) for it.

  4. BlueovalDave

    Cecil Rhodes (founder of DeBeers) as quoted here…
    Rhodes wanted to expand the British Empire because he believed that the Anglo-Saxon race was destined to greatness. In his last will and testament, Rhodes said of the English, “I contend that we are the first race in the world, and that the more of the world we inhabit the better it is for the human race. I contend that every acre added to our territory means the birth of more of the English race who otherwise would not be brought into existence.”

    he also spoke of eventually taking over the world. His seed money came from the Rothschilds. Have I said enough…

    Reply
    • Will

      You’ve said nothing. So you’re saying he’s a dated white guy with racist tendencies funded by jewish people. Although, African countries aren’t exactly bastions of innovative ideas.

      Reply
      • BlueovalDave

        read Tragedy and Hope by Carroll Quigley. Bill Clinton mentioned Carroll Quigley in his 1992 acceptance speech. Not dated at all. Just the long game. 200 years in the making. Profits from diamonds fund part of it. as does usury. Like being a serf?

        Reply
        • Ronnie Schreiber

          Damn those sneaky Elders of Zion. I’m still waiting on my first check for my share of running the world.

          On whom would you blame your failures if you didn’t have Jews to scapegoat?

          Reply
          • -Nate

            “On whom would you blame your failures if you didn’t have Jews to scapegoat?”

            Typically the non whites in the area although the Polish got a good going over when I was young…..

            -Nate

          • BlueovalDave

            Tragedy and Hope fingers English elite and round tables such as CFR, Bilderberg, Club of Rome, etc.
            Sure Rothschild and Central Bankers are involved. Why paint with such a broad brush? I was not. I don’t think Cecil Rhodes was Jewish.

    • Balrog

      Two months? Now THREE months?

      Last I remember it was SIX WEEKS salary and I thought THAT was bullshit………….

      Reply
    • Danio

      I always found the thought of the two month salary rule on a ring hilarious. Why not spend it on a great tit-job and have a lot more fun? Engagement boob jobs are a way better idea.

      Reply
  5. Orenwolf

    Absolutely true, and what’s more, though you didn’t cover it in your article, diamonds are mined in some terrible ways in third-world countries, too.

    “engineered diamonds” are becoming a thing and are being certified the same way “natural” diamonds are now, which is awesome. Both Canada and the US have reputable engineered diamond vendors who you can go to if you don’t want to support third-world diamond mining.

    The very concept of a wedding (or hell, a marriage) is as much about tradition, culture, and expressions of love as it is anything else, so I don’t think it’s fair to declare the want of a diamond engagement ring as “superfluous” in that context – technically the whole wedding idea is “superfluous”. So given that:

    1 – if “natural diamond” matters to whomever, at least get one that can be traced back to a Canadian or US mine
    2 – if natural doesn’t matter, get one grown in Canada or the US.
    3 – if “used” is ok, find an heirloom diamond on the cheap and solve the whole mining/engineering thing completely.
    4 – and of course, if neither you or your partner care about those sorts of traditions, don’t do it at all!

    Reply
    • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

      I mostly agree with you, sans one thing:

      Weddings and marriage are crucial to the emotional health and well-being of children. They are far from superfluous.

      Scratch that — they are essential for a child’s physical well-being as well. Young men who grow up in another man’s house are far more likely to “accidentally” die.

      Reply
      • silentsod

        Young men without father figures in their life entirely are more likely to end up in prison, not hold a job, and have a much harder time generally in life than those with a father present. The marriage bond, even excluding religious reasons, is a cultural boon and the fact Western society currently finds it in vogue to effectively shit all over it and the nuclear family (for the poor, mind you, the well off are likely to marry and stay that way) is unfortunate at best and an ongoing disaster at worst.

        Reply
      • Harry

        Years ago I also would have argued marriage was archaic ect. And a few years later I would have made an argument similar to Jack’s above.

        A throwaway paragraph from a mostly humorous NR article has made me realize how much my views on the subject have matured over the years.
        https://www.nationalreview.com/2018/04/left-ruins-everything-it-touches/

        This paragraph

        The Left has made innumerable women unhappy, even depressed, with its decades of lying about how female sexual nature and male sexual nature are identical — leading to a “hookup” culture that leaves vast numbers of young women depressed — and its indoctrinating of generations of young women into believing they will be happier through career success than marital success.

        I disagree with its premise. While I don’t think male and female sexual nature are identical, I think I disagree with how much the author thinks they are different. I believe the “hookup” culture has left a huge number of young men depressed, and not just in an involuntary celibacy way.

        People need a goal. I think exploring multiple partners and finding the correct compatible one, and having fun along the way are all good things. However, without an endpoint or goal, it becomes dispair or boring.

        That’s a good reason for marriage.

        Reply
        • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

          …and marriage is a key component of that stability. Marriage is meant to be the opposite of MP3 encoding: easy to do and hard to break. There are reasons for that.

          Reply
    • Will

      No.Engineered diamonds are not certified the same way Oren. You test for them to make sure they they’re fake and offer bupkis for them. As a former diamond buyer, GIA and EGL would go out of business if that were the case.

      Reply
  6. XJR01

    By this logic everything is a scam. Wine is just a fermented grape juice, Rolex watch is just an overpriced timekeeping device made redundant by a smart phone, and sportscars that we admire so much, are nothing more than glorified transportation pods.

    Reply
    • sabotenfighter

      False. The values for those and competitive objects aren’t propped up by a monopoly/cartel.
      Quality wine, for example, depends on so many more factors than just fermenting out a bottle of Welch’s. “Total nobodies” to the majority of people in the world make some of the best wine/champagne, and barely sell it outside of their region.

      Now, if we’re talking “ultra premium” products, such as Grey Goose, Patron, Moet, LV, Gucci, etc., yes. that shit is all a scam to separate dumb middle class people and nouveau riche from their money. Really, its more shrewd marketing more than a “scam” though.

      Reply
      • Will

        LOL. Jewelry has been around for hundreds of years and has lasted a long time and been passed down to generations. You see jewelry in museums. The idea it’s propped up by a cartel is laughable. You have no clue as to what you are talking about. It takes hundreds of man hours to make some jewelry out there.

        Reply
  7. Eric H

    That whole Foxconn suicide factory thing needs to die with all the other meme bullshit.
    With the number of employees they have the amount of suicides they have is about half of the expected number vs. the general population. Their buildings were just convenient places to jump from.

    Reply
    • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

      I’ve read that as well, but once you adjust for age and economic status the numbers don’t seem to hold up.

      In one year, nineteen people at that factory threw themselves off the roof. Only 200 or so people jumped off the Twin Towers on September 11th, for God’s sake.

      Reply
      • Ronnie Schreiber

        It’s interesting the way the establishment media has effectively censored photos and video of the 9/11 jumpers, and I don’t think anyone’s ever published a photo of their remains on the ground.

        We can’t have people getting righteously angered, can we?

        Reply
  8. scotten

    So did the diamond industry latch onto the same-sex marriage wave at all? Seems like a good place to double your sales.

    And I’m still convinced divorce lawyers were either lobbying for, supporting, or all in favor of gay marriage because it gives them another market to ‘mine’.

    Reply
      • Danio

        “So did the diamond industry latch onto the same-sex marriage wave at all? Seems like a good place to double your sales.”

        But only 2 percent of the population is gay. And they all aren’t getting married…

        Reply
        • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

          Judging from what I see in the mass media, it has to be more like 45%. And another 40% of them are “straight” men drinking Soylent and eating “local food”.

          Reply
  9. VoGo

    Good insight, Jack, although I’d generalize further. All “fine” jewelry is a scam perpetrated on the feeble minded, vain and status-seeking.

    Reply
      • Ronnie Schreiber

        It depends how they are designed and, perhaps more importantly, how they are purchased.

        My mother recently passed away and her estate includes enough fine jewelry to literally fill a safe deposit box. She taught me a lot of things, one of which is never to buy jewelry retail. Jewelry stores have a 66% margin.

        In the early 1960s, she worked as a bookkeeper for a small Hebrew book and gift store that carried some jewerly like gold and silver stars of David. Mom really liked jewelry. My parents’ marriage was contentious at times, but we knew that when dad handed mom one of those small manilla envelopes at dinner that she’d be happy for a while.

        Mom got to know some of the store’s suppliers, one of whom, Mr. Bosch, was a chassidic Jew from Williamsburg, Brooklyn, who spoke very little English. Long after she stopped working for the book store, she’d act as Mr. Bosch’s driver and interpreter when he’d come to Detroit on a sales trip. After his display case was stolen when staying at a hotel, he started to stay with us in a spare bedroom. I don’t think my mom ever charged him for any of that and in time he became a family friend. I still have the set of the Code of Jewish Law, personalized with gold foil lettering, that he gave me when I was a bar mitzvah.

        He also would sell my parents jewelry at manufacturer prices. Every few weeks a small box would arrive in via insured certified mail with the return address of A. Bosch & Sons, Jewelers. Many of the pieces were custom. Mom was very particular about some things and a few pieces went back and forth between Detroit and NYC before she was satisfied.

        I’d be very suprised if, based on purchase price (possibly less than wholesale), their value hasn’t at least kept up with inflation.

        Reply
  10. Dirty Dingus McGee

    Never been a gold and diamonds kinda guy. I have one gold chain that was a gift, that I might wear twice a year. My reticence at purchasing these items has become obvious to the women in my life over the years, much to their dismay. I always was more inclined to collect ACTUAL precious metal; brass and lead. I figured it had to be more valuable, due to folks using those two to protect the diamonds and gold.

    Reply
  11. totitan

    I know that I am guilty of being a grouchy old curmudgeon who doesn’t always read things thoroughly before commenting but on this subject I agree with you 100%. When I got engaged to my wife in 1979 I bought her a fine half carat diamond and she designed her own ring. In the subsequent decades she has insisted that I do not buy her any more diamonds. Instead she has always said save your money and build me my dream house someday. I listened and a week and a half ago construction started on said house that is right in the center of 10 beautiful acres in Colorado. She retired a couple years ago at the age of 62 and I will retire this October when we move into the new place. I suspect it will be a considerably better investment than had I bought her a lot of diamonds.

    Reply
  12. Will

    A ton of holes in this article, as someone who’s worked in the business, I can dispel these in seconds.

    1. White diamonds are plentiful, however, the 4 c’s matter. Yeah your 1 carat h, si1 is not worth what you paid, but your 3 carat E VVS1 has a lot of value maintained years later. Or your 1 carat D, IF is worth money. Again, it’s about quality

    2. Colored stones are hugely valuable. Stick with Yellow, Pink, Blue, Orange & Red diamonds. Blue diamonds also conduct electricity, just a bonus FYI

    3. People have been saying that the Russians will flood the market with their stones and they’re sitting on an abundent supply. They haven’t nor will people do that.

    4. Markup on Diamonds is 1.7 sometimes 2. It’s laughable that a store will sell it at 10 times the price. It just so isn’t the case.

    5. You bought a tiffany piece that charged you because of the Tiffany name. They outsource all your jewelry, so if you want something that they “make” give me a shout, I’ll send you to the people that make them. Although, your Tiffany piece will be of value years down the road. It’s also known in the business as paying the “asshole” tax.

    6. They have the Kimberly process that helps trace your diamonds. Plus, forvermark diamonds are all traced from where they come from.

    7. The people that own the mines with the good stones are the Indians (dot not feather) and Israeli’s.

    8.Watches crash through the floor too. We would pay pennies on the dollar for watches.

    9. Jewelry is a shit investment unless you buy certain stones or pieces from certain houses. We sold a piece that’s in the smithsonian right now which is super cool. From Van Cleef, but actually made by Oscar Heyman.

    I have more, but there’s a ton wrong with this piece. 😀

    Reply
  13. Frank Galvin

    Ms. Galvin was the recipient of a signet ring – as I made the spontaneous (read – intoxicated) decision to request her hand in marriage, sans financed ring, so something had to pressed into service. The following morning, after the advil began to take effect, she asked me to look at some pages on overstock dot com. Ha! Rock bottom discounted pressed carbon at ridiculously low prices. Sold!

    Reply
  14. tyates

    “So sweetie, Bark Maruth’s brother says that diamonds are for morons so I’m not going to get you one. Bark Maruth’s brother. Umm, never mind, it was a joke, he’s not really… I mean yes they are brothers but… No, me not getting you a diamond wasn’t the joke, that was me being serious.

    “Oh, you have something for me? What a nice surprise. Yes, that sure is a beautiful straight razor… No, honey, I just shaved this morning, I really don’t need to….”

    Reply
  15. -Nate

    Good article Jack ;

    A Friend of mine tried to break it down to me some years ago but wasn’t as articulate as you are .

    I once bought a diamond ring for a GF, she complained and a year later I had to rescue it from a Pawn Shop, you’re not kidding about the loss of value ! .

    I shoulda bought her a used one to begin with .

    Never again .

    -Nate

    Reply
  16. JustPassinThru

    The diamond-scam will collapse, once a majority of people can (again) not afford to waste such a large amount of money on something that only signifies class and status.

    Like diamonds. Like gold chains. Like $200 celebrity-athlete-signed sneakers.

    Like SUVs, for people who would rather have a root canal than a camping weekend. Like – and Jack won’t agree with this – expensive, bejeweled watches.

    We have been a wealthy, spoiled society; and we have allowed dysfunction to creep in to where it’s about to jam the gears. A reset is in the works; and I would submit that one’s money – which itself will be worthless fiat paper – could be put to better use.

    Buy gold, for example – just not for decorations. The “archaic relic” in my expectation, will again become recognized as the one uncorruptible store of wealth.

    Reply
    • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

      To the contrary, the watch market is ALREADY collapsing.

      The only way not to lose your shirt on a watch is to buy one of the currently in-demand Rolexes and then sell it before the fashion fades.

      Reply
    • John C.

      The diamond collapse would be brought about more likely by people not marrying any more. Bad for society. A diamond is permanent and for life like ideally marriage. If the heirs of a matriarch don’t get enough for her pride and joy after her death, I will not shed a tear. Reselling diamonds should be left to fences.

      Reply
  17. Danny

    Does this scam also apply to other gemstones, like emeralds and rubies etc? Or are diamonds the only gems that can be made so easily in a lab?

    Reply
    • James

      Sapphire, at least, is manufactured to the point where it shows up as crystals for $300 watches.

      The problem with gold, from a woman’s point of view, is that it’s not flashy. A diamond is.

      Reply
    • Eric H

      Rubies are so cheap that you use them for grinding wheels and they don’t cost significantly more than the aluminum oxide wheels.

      Reply
  18. stingray65

    The whole jewelry industry has its basis as a way for a woman to have financial security in the event she lost her husband to early death. Women were typically prohibited from owning or inheriting property, which usually went to a male relative (son or father), or having bank accounts or other investments, so jewelry was often the only asset they had that could be sold off when needed. It was also helpful that jewelry is typically rather small and hence portable and easy to hide. Thus jewelry is a reminder of the time when women had no rights and were totally dependent on men – no wonder modern women can’t get enough of the stuff.

    Of course today a woman is unlikely to lose her husband to death, and is the party that initiates about 2/3 of all divorces, to which they are typically entitled to half the marital assets, plus child support and even alimony. Given the reversal of fortune, it would seem the jewelry custom should also be reversed and women should be giving their man valuable trinkets so that the poor sap has something to live off when the marriage explodes and the wife’s divorce attorney cleans out his net worth so she “can find herself” or find “someone that appreciates me” or get out from the “thumb of patriarchy”.

    Reply
    • Ronnie Schreiber

      One reason why Jews have been in the gemstone business for a long time is that they are both very valuable and very portable. You can carry a family’s life savings in your pocket if you have to move in a hurry.

      The name Shapiro is related to sapphire and Margolin/Margolis is from the Hebrew word for diamond. I have a friend whose last name is Ruby.

      Reply
        • tyates

          Wow – that’s interesting. I have heard the same thing about Asia also – having enough gold in your pocket at the right time was sometimes the difference between getting stuck in a bad situation or managing to escape.

          Reply
  19. S2k Chris

    My wife wanted a (very low) five figure diamond. She got it. It was completely stupid. OTOH I’ve already blown way more than that ring cost on things like cars and firearms. I hazard a guess that you’ve spent more on race tires than a nice ring. We’ve all got our vices. Just because we enjoy ours and not theirs does not make ours more rational.

    Reply
    • silentsod

      Thankfully my wife is not big on jewelry and was more than pleased with her wedding and engagement rings which were a combined total of less than a grand.

      I can’t imagine spending $10k+ on a ring.

      Reply
    • Danio

      How much more enjoyment is there to be found in a $10,000 ring versus a $1,000 ring? Simple math says $9,000 more. Since this article is about value, is $9,000 worth of bragging rights worth $9,000?

      Reply
  20. Paul M.

    Lol – a man that likes to buy genuine American shoes and guitars, but hates buying genuine diamonds for his women. What does that say for you? SAD 🤔

    Reply
    • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

      If it helps, I would buy genuine fake diamonds made in the United States over “real” diamonds from India or South Africa.

      Reply
      • -Nate

        “If it helps, I would buy genuine fake diamonds made in the United States over “real” diamonds from India or South Africa.”

        There you go again Jack ~ being honest and thoughtful .

        When will you ever learn ? .

        -Nate

        Reply
  21. Crancast

    Enjoyed the read. The icing is the “Crushing on You” diamond ring ad AdSense served up at the end of the piece. Oh the irony.

    Reply
  22. Daniel J

    I got my wife a red spinel. My mother was into gems before she passed and gave me a really good education on gemstones. A really good quality Ruby or sapphire is far more rare than a similar quality diamond. The same goes for a red spinel. As has been pointed out, marketing and a monopoly has put the diamond on the pedestal where it is today.

    I’ve heard that men should spend 3 months or 6 months salary rule. That wasn’t happening. Nor did she want me spend that sort of money, either. She had her heart set on a small Ruby, but due to the embargo on Burma right now, decent quality rubies are hard to find. A nice looking half carat Ruby can go for 3k. A carat easily 8 or more.

    Red spinel isn’t quite as durable as rubies are, but are the most durable over other red varieties of gemstones. I found a nice red spinel right over a carat and had a ring made. She couldn’t have been happier. The spinel is now worth about double what I paid.

    Diamonds imho should be left for industrial/tool applications.

    Reply

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