(Last) Weekly Roundup: The Gospel Accord-ing To Jack Edition

Has it really been five years since I bought my Accord Coupe? In truth, it’s been five years and a few days. In theory, the last payment was due on the first of March. I made it twenty days early and now I have the title. This is the first time I’ve paid off a car loan since I finished my Boxster in 2010; everything since then was lease-returned, sold early, traded-in, or bent in half.

Auto loans, much like pornographic images, are often loudly derided by their most thoroughly-addicted users. I’ve paid cash for a fair number of cars and bikes over the years but I never felt like braying about it. Where and when it was appropriate, I’ve never hesitated to borrow money for a car. It’s some of the cheapest funding you can get; I think my MKT loan is five percent, which would have been lousy three years ago but seems good now.

Anyway, the Accord is now paid off. It’s now entirely my car. Every once in a while, someone asks about buying it. I’m one of those everything’s-for-sale types so here is the Riverside Green “deal”: The car has 71,000 miles, one panel dent measuring 2 x 3 inches, fresh brakes all the way around, and a back bumper that could use a re-spray. I installed a Class 1 trailer hitch for a bike rack. $16,999 takes it home, FOB Powell, Ohio. The lucky buyer gets the OEM wheels with worn-out Primacy OEM tires, one set of O.Z. Omnias mounting one-third worn Cooper “performance” tires, and one set of Tire Rack special wheels mounting Blizzak winter tires.

You could do a lot worse for the money; this is a fast, capable, and charming car. I don’t expect anyone to buy it, which would suit me just fine.

Another realization brought to me by the arrival of the Accord’s title: it’s now been sixty-two months since Danger Girl and I were in our infamous crash together. When I signed the purchase order on the grey coupe, I wasn’t in any way sure about my financial, personal, or romantic future. Things seem more settled now. That could be an illusion. I hope it is not. It’s not just that my life is better than it was the day after the crash; it’s that my life is better than the day it was before the crash. For that, and for many other things, I am grateful.

Last week, I wrote about a far more ambitious purchase that did not go nearly as well.

49 Replies to “(Last) Weekly Roundup: The Gospel Accord-ing To Jack Edition”

  1. AvatarEconomist

    Great article on the Phaeton. Of course, the first comment was written by someone who presumably had just adjusted their glasses and had to correct you on an obscure technical point.
    I guess the internet is the same all around.

    Reply
    • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

      Yeah, particularly since he was WRONG; while the Audi IS aluminum, it was developed along the others and is considered to be a platform relative by VW.

      Reply
      • AvatarShortest Circuit

        Classic and Sports Car has this ‘Pedant of the month’ prize: if you correct an obscure mistake in the magazine, you get a C&SC baseball cap.
        (That’s made of course fairly difficult by the fact that you can’t just google the steering lock angle of a Vauxhall PA Cresta unless someone’s father had 3 of them…)
        Maybe the guy just wanted a Hagerty beanie.

        Reply
  2. AvatarMike

    I’m 6 payments into the 60 I promised on my ’18 Mazda 3 hatch, and still think grabbing that note was one of the better things I’ve done recently. My credit union blessed me with a fixed 2.49% on the car, which is arguably indistinguishable from “free money”.

    Some haggling on said car got the sticker price down to 15,9xx.xx, a grand cheaper than your asking price for a 5 year old Honda. But I get that you don’t _really_ want to sell it. Hell, if someone offered me $17k for my car I’d probably pass.

    Reply
  3. AvatarJustPassinThru

    Interesting recounting of The Dealer Experience. Unspoken in that, is the difficulty in dealing with German-car, or European-car, dealerships and companies.

    My only VW experiences were with a Super Beetle, bought well-used, and a Vanagon Westfalia, bought almost-as-well used. From used-car dealers in both cases. But family members had bought a Rabbit, a Westmoreland specimen in the dark days of VWoA’s foundering…1981. What was observed was a dealer network and corporate support, with the ethics of a grave robber.

    From there, the elderly-female family member went (four years later) to the Toyota store. There to try out a new model, the Camry. She liked. She bought. The loss in driving dynamics were lost on her; but the promise of a better, less-hassle owner experience were compelling.

    And they held true, also. At about 40,000 miles the Camry developed its first issue – when the starter stripped the drive pinion. Towed to the dealership. Arrangements were made to cart bags of gold over to pay for the inevitable bill.

    The Service Advisor announced: “No charge!” Floors and walls wobbled.

    Turns out, Toyota had found a factory flaw, misalignment of the starter and ring gear. So, the engine/transmission were pulled; flywheel pressed out and replaced, starter replaced, alignment corrected, reinstalled. On an out-of-warranty car.

    Toyota won a customer for life – four customers, actually, of all those who saw this.

    Which is part of how Toyota, with bland, dull, boring cars, became so big, while VW, with Rabbits and Golfs and exciting dynamics, is constantly an also-ran.

    Reply
    • AvatarJohn C.

      The koolaid is served and everyone toast the all glorious Toyota! With different biases the same story on a say Citation, with the same generous manufacturer out of warranty coverage, would be one of this horrible breakdown that left an elderly owner stranded at only 40,000 miles.

      Reply
    • AvatarJohn C.

      The koolaid is served and everyone toast the all glorious Toyota! With different biases the same story on a say Citation, with the same generous manufacturer out of warranty coverage, would be one of this horrible breakdown that left an elderly owner stranded at only 40,000 miles.

      Reply
      • AvatarJustPassinThru

        Sorry, John, but buying a car is not an emotional act. It is not charity for underdawgs; it is not a place to show one’s ethnic preferences or cultural affinity.

        It is the purchase of a durable good. And as I, and as millions of others have found, Toyota-manufactured vehicles have been, for three decades, hands-down the most durable and resiliant products made available.

        That is not market puffery. That is not after-the-fact support of a choice already made. That is the result of lifetimes (my own, siblings’, parents’) of side-by-side comparisons.

        I have owned everything from a Kaiser to a Yugo, to several GM duds, to a few AMC products….Chrysler, Ford, and Datsun/Nissan. A Suzuki/Geo. Never was fool enough to buy a British Leyland, but a friend of my older brother, was; and I wasn’t going to make the same mistake.

        If you don’t like Toyotas, for whatever emotive reason you have, then don’t buy one. You CAN’T really buy many British cars, now, and there’s a reason. The market tried them and rejected them. Those of us who make these choices of empirical facts, will, probably, continue to buy Toyotas at least until another brand emerges superior.

        Reply
        • AvatarCJinSD

          John drives Chinese cars, but he thinks the rest of us should support Detroit so people with his refined tastes can enjoy what they want without guilt.

          Reply
          • AvatarJohn C.

            Every car is spiritually Chinese now, because people decided it was okay to not support workers and designers who know what they are doing but rather people who copy and don’t pay royalties on what they copy. This was the Japanese innovation and what the Chinese have taken to heart. Looks or how it drives don’t matter. Pedigree, you have to be kidding. If a rebel from Chad can make do with a Hilux, err… Great Wall, so can we and our stick it to the man sensibilities are secure.
            PS. Sorry for the double comment above

          • AvatarJustPassinThru

            “Spiritually Chinese.” No. Negatory, good buddy.

            Would you like to examine why it was the Japanese were able to emerge from their radioactive ruins so fast, where the Russians, who had not nearly the war damage, never did? Why the GDR, even WITH the BMW prewar plant within their zone, could make nothing better than the Trabant and the Russians nothing better than the Ural motorcycle? And Ladas – obsolete Fiat 124s after Fiat sold the Soviets the tooling.

            Why the Yugoslavs did the impossible – take a Fiat and make it WORSE? And why Chinese motorcycles are almost-universally crap, and probably their cars as well.

            The key here, is free-market capitalism as opposed to State ownership and/or control.

            To the question of China: The Chinese, which still live under a totalitarian system, are copying much of the surface forms of capitalism. But they don’t understand it and they don’t believe in it. They have been taught for three generations, that capitalism is exploitation. So they exploit – they make shoddy products, generally licensed designs, make them in batches; sell them cheap; close the line and/or dissolve the company, and then reopen under another name.

            Because they think that’s what capitalism is and does.

            The Japanese, by comparison, had the basis of a free market before the war. After, private business was allowed and encouraged. And W. Edwards Demming, the Bell Laboratories quality-control guru who was key to the war effort, gave presentations to heads of Japanese industry. This after having been dismissed by auto and steel and manufacturing business leaders in the States. Japanese auto companies adopted quality controls and the approach of Continuous Improvement, early on – and it showed in their products by the late 1960s.

            The Koreans, to their credit, copied what the Japanese were doing and it’s working as well for them. Hyundai, a joke in its first years, is now rating as high in perceived quality as the top Japanese brands. Kia, a sub-Geo throwaway brand, is likewise surprising buyers. (Myself included – a 10-year-old Kia I bought for a song, has given me 25,000 additional trouble-free miles. Now at 119,000 and ding fine.)

            The Chinese? No f**ks given. I keep on seeing it again and again – even the best efforts, that Mini-Me “adventure” bike made by Zongshen for CSC Motorcycles, keeps on showing issues. It’s probably the best motor vehicle made out of China that’s been seen in the US – but perfect it is not. Far from it.

            They don’t believe in the system. They believe in gulling and conning the customer and then disappearing. Just as the Zastava people didn’t believe in quality control in their Yugo line. Just employ the number of people the commissars ordered, and produce the number of units ordered…and if the customer doesn’t like it, he will say nothing. Complaining was probably Treason.

            I don’t know what you’re trying to tell us, John – what you’re advocating or what you’re supporting. But politics, like cultural chauvinism, has no place in an intelligent buying decision.

          • AvatarJohn C.

            Interesting the switch to Korean from Toyota loyalty. With the wealth transfer and currency adjustment, Japan has to pay it’s workers a western level salary. Well Korean cars are just ripped off Mitsubishis er British Leyland er Chrysler DNA and they still pay the workers a little less, so why not give them a try. Sure their labor situation is more British like, with unions fighting that the workers participate, but hey that was just a talking point. What a race for the bottom.

          • AvatarJustPassinThru

            Interesting, the OBSESSION of the race/ethnicity/national-origin of the automakers I’ve chosen to patronize (if only second-hand, with used buys).

            Other posters can poor-mouth them all they want, but the proof of the pudding is the tasting. (That’s a British expression, so it should meet with approval). Success WORKS. My Korean POS looks funny, has a funny name, is made by people who don’t look like me and talk in a tongue I can’t understand – but my Korean POS was better when I bought it, with 92,000 miles, then a new Escort I bought in 1985.

          • Avatargtem

            “where the Russians, who had not nearly the war damage, never did?”

            This is a bad take. Where/when did you learn history?

        • AvatarWidgetsltd

          Regarding the Fiat 124 and the Lada: The 124 was still in production when the Lada went on sale. Indeed, the 124 was European Car of the Year in 1967, so the Lada was hardly “obsolete” when it was introduced in 1970. Fiat sold the soviets the design for the car and they constructed the Russian factory in which it was built. The Lada had quite a few key differences to make it suitable for the awful road conditions in the USSR: leaf-sprung rear suspension (not coil & link), rear drum brakes, a unique SOHC engine, a thicker gauge of steel in the body structure, etc.

          Reply
          • Avatargtem

            @Widgetsltd

            All the Fiat based Ladas retained the 5 link coil sprung rear end, fwiw. A key distinction from the leaf sprung Moskvitches which rural folks like my grandfather preferred for their payload capacity (that and that’s what was doled out to him in the waiting line lol). But I agree with your point, at the time, the Soviets selected what was basically one of the top cars in the field to bring in for domestic production, AND it gained a SOHC engine compared to the original OHV Fiat mill.

  4. Avatarhank chinaski

    Speaking of big VAG iron (Aluminum?), I’m reminded of the beater A8 brought to the last track day I attended. I recall it was shod with snow tires, was missing a headlight, and had to be towed away during the warmup lap.

    Reply
    • Avatargtem

      My brother was trying to goad me into taking my beater A4 to the track, I suspect the result would have been similar.

      Reply
  5. AvatarCJinSD

    I’m not going to argue for or against borrowing to buy a car. I am concerned about the duration of terms combined with the rapidly climbing prices of popular vehicles. I just saw a review of a Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon that listed for $60K. I see those things in trailer parks I pass leaving the beach, outside tattoo parlors, and at my buddy’s pawn shop. They do not appeal to too many people who should be driving expensive cars. Some short-sighted women of moderate means buy them, but there is no way they’re going to put up with the miserable reality of Jeep commuting long enough for their 84 month loans to get right side up. I also suspect that the people who will get into debt for seven years to buy a car are exactly the same people who need something new and shiny to make them feel better about themselves. It seems to me that the marriage of negative equity for five years and a consumerist jones is a bad combination.

    Reply
    • Avataryamahog

      No kidding on those wranglers. I work in a FAANG, there are engineers and managers here who have 8 digit compensation packages, and the median car parked at a beach or outside a tattoo parlor is more expensive and newer than the median car in my work parking lot.

      When I worked at a fortune 500 and my 19 year old rusty Lexus stood out like a sore thumb amid endless hot hatches and new CUVs. Now I work with much wealthier people and it seems like they drive Accords and Rav4s until they make enough money to get a Tesla or a Porsche.

      A fool and his money, huh?

      Reply
    • AvatarS2k Chris

      Interesting to use the Wrangler as an example of poor borrowing; Wranglers have some of the highest resale in the business. Unless you completely screw the pooch at purchase with terrible credit/absurd terms/negative equity, it’s impossible to be too far upside down on one.

      I leased my new JLU, but that has more to do with first model years and a distrust of FCA than anything financial.

      Reply
      • AvatarCJinSD

        Four years ago, I almost bought a new Wrangler on a whim. I was hearing about how tough they were to get in some markets, while my local dealer had them piled high and advertised with deep discounts. The opportunity to get something with a stick and a naturally aspirated engine for well under $30K seemed tempting, until I found out that I didn’t qualify for the advertised price. As for the resale value, how will that be impacted by the new $60K price ceiling? How much was an Unlimited Rubicon last year? I don’t recall ever seeing a $50K MSRP on a Wrangler. What’s the longest note you can get on a used car now?

        Reply
  6. Avatartrollson

    I have a Toyota with almost 190,000 miles on it, still running strong. Interior and exterior in great shape. Suspension is tired by now, but I have no problem replacing the struts because everything else on the car is solid.

    The only frustrating thing about Toyota these days is they seem to be playing a game of ‘how ugly can we make our cars’ and people still buy em.

    Reply
    • AvatarBenJohnson

      My pet theory: Toyota is making ugly cards to keep demand low and level production – planned obsolescence is a side effect. See also: Haijunka demand leveling.

      Reply
  7. AvatarRonnie Schreiber

    Things seem more settled now. That could be an illusion. I hope it is not.

    From my perspective, the best place you’ve been since I’ve know you. With your personality I don’t think you could ever be completely at peace but you’re in a good place now. I think it shows, positively, in your writing. Of course I’m not an adherent to the tortured artist theory. J.S. Bach had a pretty normal and based personal life.

    Reply
    • AvatarMike

      Why? If the loaning authority is giving me money at basically the rate of inflation, why should I divert any of my own cash towards it? I financed my recent new car 100%. The plan is also to keep it for longer than the term of the loan.

      I was talking to a co-worker the other day who’s at a critical point in car ownership. His lease is up, and his wife’s ’13 Altima no longer suits her. She wants a CUV. I told him, there’s two ways to buy cars “smartly”: Either buy cheap seats and drive them till they die, or buy new and run them until they demonstrate unreliability- which would hopefully be several years after they’re paid off. In his case, the Altima’s paid off, so I told him to ditch his lease (A ’16 Cruze), rock the Altima, and buy the wife a new CUV (I recommended the CX-5; they have just one kid).

      The conundrum is he doesn’t like the Altima. He’s not a “car guy”, but the Altima was his “wife’s car” and apparently that’s created some mental hurdle preventing it from becoming “his car”. (I blame toxic masculinity.)

      Reply
      • Avatareverybodyhatesscott

        Why? If the loaning authority is giving me money at basically the rate of inflation, why should I divert any of my own cash towards it?

        If you’re not financing through a business, you lose the spread on taxes. If I finance a 20k car for 5%, I pay 1000 bucks in interest a year. If I find a money market that pays 5% (they don’t but lets pretend) I get 1000 bucks in interest a year for the cash I kept instead of paying cash for the car. In theory, that nets to 0 in interest paid/ received but you pay 20% of the interest you receive in taxes. So it costs you $200 a year if you can get the exact same return. In reality, you’ll get 2.8% on your money in this economy so that 5% loan costs you $552 a year.

        If you don’t need the flexibility of having the cash on hand, financing doesn’t make much sense. I get that most people don’t have 20k they can just part with.

        Reply
        • AvatarS2k Chris

          “If I finance a 20k car for 5%, I pay 1000 bucks in interest a year.”

          Say what now? $20k at 5% for 60 months has a total of $2645 of interest. You might pay $1k the first year, but that’s it. Over the life of the loan your figures don’t check out.

          Reply
          • AvatarEverybodyhatesscotr

            The interest rate doesn’t change. So yeah, the 1000 bucks the first year but you’re always losing the spread. The year you pay it off you get a tax free return of 5% by not paying interest.

            And 2645 of interest at a 20k loan sucks.

          • Avatareverybodyhatesscott

            Now that I’m actually back at a computer. “Free money” at the rate of inflation costs you $603 over the life of the loan if you can get a 5% return. If you go by the real world where the loan is 5% and the 5 year CD rate is 3.1%, it’ll cost you $1,446. 1,446 over five years isn’t a ton of money but it isn’t nothing either.

          • Avatar-Nate

            ” $1,446 over five years isn’t a ton of money but it isn’t nothing either.”

            For a much larger percentage of Americans than you realize, this is an enormous amount of money .

            -Nate

        • AvatarMike

          I financed my new car purchased last year at 2.49%. Last I checked, my non-retirement investments were making significantly more than that. Enough to more than cover the taxes paid on that income.

          Reply
    • Avatarsgeffe

      Which is why I generally trade up after six or seven years. I get a nice break from payments for a while, yet my current sled will make for a nice down-payment, so I’m not staring down the barrel of a $400/month note! (If the base payment is lower, then I can make a higher payment to principal!)

      I’m just grateful that I have a good enough position that allows me to be able to keep the pattern going!

      Reply
  8. AvatarRick T.

    Almost bought a Phaeton back in 2003. Bought a MB E500 instead. Can’t say I exactly dodged a bullet because the Benz was nothing but a money pit and there was always something (or somethings) wrong with it but my wife loved it so what do you do. Material quality was just awful both inside and under the hood. Had a happy ending last December when a pickup with a trailer hitch backed into to and totaled it out. Should have bought the third contender – LS400 – but I felt I was “too young” (50) for it.

    Reply
  9. AvatarAcd

    $16,999 sounds like the My Wife is Forcing Me to Sell It But I Don’t Want To So I’ll Price It High Enough That No One Will Ever Buy It price. As they say on Bring a Trailer, GLWTS.

    Reply
    • AvatarDisinterested-Observer

      I saw a Toyota (Hilux? what do we call it here?) pickup for sale on the side of the road. Stopped to see what it was about. It looked like it had driven everyone of its 350k miles through salt. Engine was replaced 200k ago. Guy wanted $4500 for it. Either he was delusional or there were domestic factors behind the sale.

      Reply
  10. AvatarDirty Dingus McGee

    The last new vehicle I bought WITHOUT a sizeable down payment is my 86 Shelby Charger, $1500 down, $280 month for 48, My next (last) purchase was 20 years later, 2006 Dodge 3500 diesel “610”. My trade was $4000 and I added $10K cash, 5 year note at $270 per. Back story for why I did that; A co-worker of my dad had lousy self control on trading vehicles & the financial discipline of a 9 year old for buying anything. IIRC in 1988 he ended up with his 4th or 5th trade for a newer/different vehicle in a 2-3 year span, a new Toyota 4runner. My dad sat down with him one day and figured out that he was upside down to the tune of around $25,000.I’m no financial genius, but even I knew that I couldn’t afford to find myself in that boat. He ended up about a year later turning the 4runner back to the dealership, and declaring bankruptcy for the near $40,000 of credit card debt he had.

    I believe I’ll pass on your Accord. My personal preference is to NOT buy vehicles that have been “well salted” for several winters. Having spent time in Columbus, I’ve seen what some 10-12 year old cars/trucks look like. As an extreme example, I recall seeing a approximately 20 year old Civic where the rear passenger door was rotted away nearly up to the door handle. And it was hammering at about 75 mph on 275 near Obetz. I slowed way down, for fear something would fall off and hit me and my bike.

    Reply
  11. AvatarEric L.

    I drove my ’01 Taurus from Louisville to Columbus to trade it in on an ’02 Nipponsei Maxima. A 6-speed manual with a cool 120K miles on the clock. The cloudy March skies obscured the poorly repaired panel damage.

    That was only 9 years ago, but I can’t for the life of me remember what the dealership’s name was. Or where it was. Dublin, I think. Or Powell? Pataskala? I get all the Columbus suburbs confused. John Reuben has a killer song about Pataskala, which is the beginning and end of my knowledge of your awful city.

    That was a) the first and only time I’ll ever visit Columbus and b) the last time I’m ever (knowingly) purchasing a car from the rust belt. Never again, man. Never again.

    Hey! That means I’m 2 weeks out from my 9 year anniversary of daily driving stick.

    Reply
    • Avatargtem

      Oh, 5spd 5.5 Maxima, good taste. But from the Salt Belt? I learned the same lesson with my ’00 Maxima that I briefly owned before discovering the lower radiator core support was swiss cheese.

      Reply
      • AvatarEric L.

        gtem, ol’ buddy! I forgot you had that Maxima. Unlike the Toyotas you usually knock around, the glorious stick-shift FWD VQ35DE in the ’02-’06 Maxima and RWD VQ35s ’03-’08 350Z/G35 were always paired with a six-speed transmission–of varying toughnesses and number of synchros (later years = more cones on 2nd and 3rd and more resilient to abuse).

        Too bad your ’00 had a, heh, swiss cheese radiator hose. It’s much more interesting than whatever early 00s V6 Lexus you’re driving that week. 🙂

        Strangely, of the 3 6MT VQ35DE sedans I’ve owned, that ’02 Maxima felt by far the fastest. My ’05 G35 sedan lacks the same frantic oomph. Maybe it’s just the better suspension setup does more accelerating with less verve? Or maybe it’s because 300HP dragging nearly 3800 lbs doesn’t compare to 255HP moving 3200 lbs.

        Reply
        • Avatargtem

          Radiator support, not hose! It has the lower engine mount bolted to it, very uneasy just looking at that thing. In hindsight, 3 flips later I discovered a very capable and affordable welder locally who would have made short work of that. But there was enough rot elsewhere and a slightly shift-flaring transmission that made me want to unload it. And yes my ’00 Maxima was a lot more fun and would have flattened my ’96 ES300 from a light, and probably would have outrun my ’01 A4 2.8 Quattro (5spd) as well! 222hp variable intake version of the VQ30, with less curb weight than either the Audi or the Lexus.

          My brother just tuned up a 257k mile ’97 Max (EGR and a bunch of small jobs), rot free southern car. Original engine/trans, runs like a raped ape. Those early 4th gens are surprisingly light too, like 2800lb.

          Reply
    • Avatarbluebarchetta

      Columbus is a great town*. Big enough to have fun things to do and a strong job market, small enough to not have Chicago-like traffic or crime. Democratic enough to be diverse, LGBTQ-friendly and artsy-quirky, Republican enough that the city is still solvent and functional.

      *BUT – we have the worst weather in the United States, except maybe for Cleveland. We have a six-month ugly gray winter that never stays quite cold enough for the outdoor winter sports you can enjoy in places like Minneapolis. Summer and fall used to be nice here, but the last couple of years, it has rained all summer and fall too, which takes the fun out of motorsports.

      On second thought, screw this rainsoaked sunless hellhole. Anybody want to buy a 3br house in the New Albany school district? Great place to raise your kids, assuming they don’t suffer from Seasonal Affective Disorder.

      Reply
      • AvatarJustPassinThru

        Columbus with the worst weather? Be serious.

        Take a ride 300 miles northwest to Buffalo. You’ll dream of sunny Columbus winter afternoons…

        Reply
        • Avatarsgeffe

          Detroit/Toledo ain’t much better in winter! This winter’s been a little less severe despite the severe cold snap in the middle of January, along with the severe windstorm a week ago. There haven’t been weeks upon weeks of bitter cold or piles upon piles of snow, like what we got in 2013 and 2014. (One of those years was record-settingly snowy, and one had weeks of single-digit (above AND below) zero temperatures.) But in addition to the brief temperature and wind extremes, the one-to-two inch (if not less), “Alberta clipper”/lake-effect-remnant snowstorms we’ve had have mostly come during the week (with the exception of our biggest by far, Saturday afternoon into Sunday morning, the first full week of January), and right around the morning or evening commute.

          Still and all, Columbus is usually spared the worst of the winter weather. But they have a good snow-removal protocol in place, as judged by the salt-rotted cars cited here. The REAL Ohio city with winter problems, I think, still has to be Cincinnati, which is paralyzed with 2 inches of powder, unless they’ve improved things in the past twenty years.

          Reply
          • AvatarEric L.

            Enjoy that Cincy snow tonight! Maybe the city will recover before the Monday commute…

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