Weekly Roundup: They Fought The Law And The Law Lost Edition

As of this writing, CNN’s front page has the word “Trump” on it sixteen times, but “Guzman” or “Chapo” are nowhere to be found. Which makes sense, of course: Donald Trump is absolutely, positively, totally going to be impeached any day now, plus he’s the President until that happens, so you’re going to hear quite a bit about it. Who the heck is Guzman?

Why, he’s just a private citizen who forced the Mexican National Guard to surrender on the field of battle last week.

Ovidio Guzman Lopez, son of the notorious (and incarcerated) Mexican drug lord “El Chapo”, was captured in a pretty daring raid by the recently-formed Mexican National Guard this past Thursday. The Mexican National Guard is not like, say, the Ohio National Guard; think of it as a branch of the Mexican Army which has license to operate inside the country.

When Chapo Junior got nabbed, his brother swung into action, ordering dozens of “sicarios”, or gang assassins, to assault the prison in which Chapo was being held. At the same time, other paramilitary units of Guzman’s Sinaloa cartel located the families of National Guard members and took them hostage. Eight people were killed in the streets as the prison walls were breached and escaping inmates were handed weapons by the sicarios.

Were this to happen in the United States, you’d presumably have Delta and Seal Team Six dropping in from helicopters within hours — but the Mexican Army was unable to get into the city to reinforce the National Guard’s positions. So the logical thing happened, at least the logical thing for Clown World: the Mexican government surrendered to a drug kingpin’s brother and let Guzman go. The significance of this is difficult to overstate. It would be like “Black Hawk Down” taking place in Chicago, or perhaps having a battalion of the 10th Mountain Division surrender to the Four Corner Blocc Crips.

For purposes of shoring up an increasingly fragile narrative, Time Magazine has helpfully informed its readers that “over 150,000 guns have gone to the cartels from American gun shops”, which is probably not true. The only thing we can say for sure is that the ATF sent 2,000 guns to the cartel a while ago and some of those guns were used to kill an American border patrol agent. The videos posted by the cartel members also show everything from F-250-mounted heavy machine guns to M249 Squad Assualt Weapons to M72 LAWS anti-tank rockets. Regardless of what you might hear on CNN, you can’t get any of that stuff at Wal-Mart or even at that one kind of scary gun store with the “MOLON LABE” stickers. Those are real military weapons, made in America by American companies and delivered to the cartel through the kinds of channels it scarcely bears thinking about lest we all be struck with permanent insomnia.

I’ve read the same statement all over the Internet from some pretty clued-in people, and it goes something like this: “The Sinaloa cartel couldn’t hold a single rural American county for twenty-four hours.” I think they’d be hard-pressed to keep control of Powell, Ohio — this place is crawling with former operators itching to take a few potshots at vibrant and diverse undocumented additions to the American tapestry. Which is not to say that these fellows are a joke. Far from it. They used documented insurgent tactics to beat an undisciplined and poorly led army.

Something tells me we’re eventually gonna have a chance to test that rural county theory. Every new group of Americans brings criminal activity with them — there’s even a book about this, called The Godfather — but the most recent have been particularly active. There are supposedly ten thousand members of MS-13 in the United States, which makes them as big as the better-known, and more telegenic, Crips and Bloods. At some point, things will come to a boil somewhere and some charismatic gang leader is going to decide that his sicarios are more than a match for the SWAT teams of Des Moines or Apple Valley.

The only real solution, other than setting the public-policy clock back to 1964 with a vigor, will be to further militarize the police — or police-ize the military. Neither of these solutions is what any sane person would consider good news. Still, I’d prefer Soviet levels of armed cops on the streets to a world run by the cartels. At least with the apparatchiks you have a tiny chance of not being beheaded in public. On the downside, you won’t get all that better food.

* * *

For Hagerty, I drove the revised 2020 GT350R, reviewed the first round of C8 Corvette coverage, and offered an opinion on Chinese-centric cowardice.

This week I’ll be driving the GT500. Have questions? Post them below.

66 Replies to “Weekly Roundup: They Fought The Law And The Law Lost Edition”

  1. AvatarNewbie Jeff

    “‘As far as I’m concerned, they’re Iowans with better food.’

    The crowd applauded loudly.”

    Good grief.

    Reply
      • AvatarNewbie Jeff

        Agreed. The level of Doublethink among leftists is more prevalent than I think Orwell ever anticipated would actually exist in reality… like our friend who commented below. His programming is complete and chronic, lecturing on stereotyping with stereotypes, countering judgment with judgment, bravely confronting “racism” with overt racism. In his world, political identity is the only thing that matters, and “justice” only moves in one direction. Imagine his outrage should anyone suggest exactly what he said, except supplanting “homeless white people” with “homeless black people”. That’s how deeply Doublethink is embedded in his worldview. He doesn’t think critically because he doesn’t need to… all his has to do is accuse his opponents of being racists or ignorant Breitbart consumers, and he’s square.

        Reply
  2. AvatarChris Tonn

    “The Mexican National Guard is not like, say, the Ohio National Guard; think of it as a branch of the Mexican Army which has license to operate inside the country.”

    Neil Young and Jim Rhodes would like to have a word with you.

    Reply
    • AvatarRonnie Schreiber

      Neil Young? You mean the guy who rationalized human sacrifice by noble savages in Cortez the Killer?

      “And the women all were beautiful
      And the men stood
      Straight and strong
      They offered life in sacrifice
      So that others could go on.”

      This part is really rich:

      “Hate was just a legend
      And war was never known”

      Sure, the Aztecs built their empire solely through peaceful means. Uh huh. One reason why Cortez was able to conquer the Aztecs with just 500 soldiers was not because of Spanish guns and Aztec myths about white-skinned gods. It was because Cortez allied himself with tribes that had been oppressed and enslaved by the Aztecs.

      Reply
        • AvatarCJinSD

          Four dead boomers was a ‘massacre.’ They could give the snowflakes a run for their drama queen dollar. How much do you want to bet that the definition of massacre ‘evolved’ after Kent State?

          Reply
          • AvatarRonnie Schreiber

            Five colonials were killed in the Boston Massacre so I suspect the word was used to describe notable multiple killings long before Kent State.

        • AvatarRonnie Schreiber

          I got the reference. My point is that Neil is hardly a font of political wisdom.

          I’m hardly a fan of the Black Lives Matter movement, but it’s interesting that the Kent State killings are much better known than the shooting of black students at Jackson State around the same time.

          Reply
  3. Avatarstingray65

    Diversity is our strength. Besides the greater selection of restaurants, just think about how the US benefits when people from among the most violent and corrupt cultures in the world cross our borders to create new ethnic enclaves in our cities, or how our schools and workplaces and overall national productivity benefit when millions of illiterate people with IQs in the 80s and 90s immigrate to the US. And just think of the benefits of greater religious tolerance we benefit from with the arrival of thousand of Muslims who believe in Sharia law, female genital mutilation, and jihad against infidels. It is incredible to believe that after all the recent bounty the US has received from illegal immigration that there are still millions of racist, xenophobic, Islamophobic and otherwise deplorable gun owning American citizens who continually vote for candidates who promise to build border walls, enforce immigration laws, and deport illegals rather than give them free health care, education, and food stamps – the Statue of Liberty weeps in shame.

    Reply
    • AvatarFred Lee

      Interesting. I interact with immigrants on a daily basis, instead of reading about them on Breitbart, and have a different view.

      I work in high tech, where a large percentage of my coworkers are immigrants. They vary from above average to far above average; certainly no sub-100 IQs there. I’m also confident that my muslim coworkers neither practice sharia law nor female genital mutilation. They’re actually kind, intelligent, family-oriented people.

      I also live in a rural area where there are a great many Mexican immigrants working on farms. Sure, I roll my eyes every time a civic with a coffee can exhaust and stanced wheels rolls up. Of course half the time it’s a white dude, but whatever. Despite the large population of mexican origin, there aren’t gang wars cropping up all over the place. We have a far bigger problem with violence from homeless white people who don’t bother getting a job, of which there are many, than from Mexicans who actually mostly seem to have jobs.

      But keep up with your stereotypes. I’m sure it puts you in good stead among your buds.

      Reply
      • AvatarCJinSD

        You should try to be less overt in your hatred of white people. Subterfuge would make your agenda capable of fooling someone who isn’t as dull-witted as a typical racist.

        Reply
      • AvatarRonnie Schreiber

        “homeless white people who don’t bother getting a job”

        No stereotypes there, no, not at all.

        BTW, the tolerant Muslims of Dearborn, Michigan prevented the opening of a Burgerim franchise there, outraged because the chain was started in Israel, even though the franchise owner is an Arab of Lebanese descent. I doubt the reaction would be so ho-hum if the Jews in my neighborhood kept an Arab-owned Middle Eastern based restaurant from opening nearby.

        https://www.detroitnews.com/story/business/2019/09/18/burgerim-nixes-dearborn-location-after-backlash/2266610001/

        Reply
      • Avatarstingray65

        Fred – you are playing the game that the media and Left plays – criticizing comments mostly aimed at illegals while highlighting wonderful anecdotal experiences with legal immigrants as neighbors and co-workers. I have no problems with legal immigrants who prove they can pay their own way and are law abiding residents, but unfortunately those characteristics are not as common as they should be (if we were more selective and enforced borders) among both legals and illegals, as large sample statistics show they are more likely to commit crimes and use welfare than citizens, and generally do more poorly at school. On the other hand, I also have no problem with enforcing vagrancy, drug, trespassing, no camping, and panhandling laws against white “homeless” citizens to get them off the streets. In fact I would gladly trade them one for one to Mexico, China, or Syria for their best and brightest, but unfortunately even the most drug addled and mental ill “homeless” are smart enough to realize that California streets are the best in the world to shoot up and defecate on.

        Reply
  4. AvatarGeorge Denzinger

    I’ve long said that we have a smoldering issue with our Southern border, something that demands our attention more than misadventures in other parts of the world. I believe that the whole system in Mexico (and points further south) is so corrupt that there is no hope of reclamation, due to the influence of drug money. We have yet to see something similar here in the US, but I imagine that the day is coming soon.

    I’d be lying if I said I knew the answer to this issue. There could be so many ways that this could unfold and I’m sure that we don’t know what we don’t know (black swan). All of the potential ideas to combat this have externalities that we are probably not prepared to comprehend.

    Reply
    • Avatarbaconator

      The answer is to end the War on Drugs and decriminalize this stuff. The analogy to Prohibition is cliche, but also entirely true.

      Here in Cali, the price of weed has rapidly dropped from $4-600 / ounce to $80-120/ounce. The weed dispensaries are pretty tame. The largest one near me is as a close a knockoff of an Apple Store as you can create without getting sued by Apple army of IP lawyers. MS-13 was growing weed in heavily-armed secluded plots of land in NorCal, and I’m told they’ve gotten out of that business and moved into meth & fentanyl now that there isn’t a margin and the high-volume distributions channels are all licensed by the state.

      And anyone who thinks that MS-13, or the Hispanic community in general, is more corrupt or violent or widespread than the Italian Mob was needs to read some history. Start with Robert F. Kennedy’s “Enemies of the State,” move on to “I Heard You Paint Houses,” and maybe wrap up with the FBI Report on the Apalachin meeting. MS-13 is *nothing* compared to organized crime in the period between the 1930s and 1980s.

      Reply
      • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

        The cartels are beheading people by the hundreds. They kill infants. Last year they stopped a tourist bus and had the tourists fight to the death. I might be wearing rose colored glasses but I dont recall Capone or his New York counterparts coming close to that.

        Reply
      • AvatarRonnie Schreiber

        Just how much organized crime affected regular Americans is an interesting question. MS-13 and the Mexican cartels seem less worried about killing regular folks. While there were protection rackets and gangsters willing to provide muscle to both sides in labor disputes, much of American organized crime from the 1930s to the 1960s was centered around existing vices: prostitution, gambling, and alcohol/drugs. While the gangs could be ruthlessly violent (Collingswood and St. Valentines Day “massacres”) most of that violence seems to have been contained within the criminal community.

        Reply
  5. AvatarJohn C.

    That was a great piece on our Chinese friends. It is after all the Chinese government’s job to stand up for China. If only our government was united in the idea that it is their job to stand up for us.

    You made me laugh at the thought of GM looking at the technical drawings of the Accord circa 1982. It would have made them delight at the simplicity, for it only had to do a few things well to appeal to a niche buyer. If Honda intended to remain in that niche, it wouldn’t have needed Marysville.

    Reply
    • AvatarCJinSD

      You really ought to read “The Decline and Fall of the US Auto Industry” by Brock Yates. GM spent twice as long trying to reverse engineer the first Accord as Honda had spent engineering it and then spent another two years rationalizing why the J-car didn’t really need to be as good as the 1977 Accord anyway. Meanwhile, Honda knocked them into the weeds with the 1982 Accord. That ‘niche buyer’ you want to dismiss was the type of people willing to pay a price for a small car that involved a profit for its manufacturer.

      Reply
      • AvatarJohn C.

        Didn’t Yates lose all credibility on the subject when he parked that futuristic little wagon in the junkyard railing how terrible it was. Wasn’t he really decrying the future of less is more? No, he twisted that more interesting critique into one about GM. Cause shitting on GM is all he ever did. What a Giant!.

        You are correct that I am amazed that those niche buyers were willing to pay so much. As the Accord transitioned into a full size virtually America only sedan. Not a word of protest from the faithful. Perhaps because it wasn’t about the enjoyment of a Japanese Sirocco, it was about a political movement spitting at the establishment.

        Reply
        • AvatarCJinSD

          It was about a high quality car that surprised and delighted its drivers, something that apparently is of zero interest to someone who drives a Chinese car after years of commie crap from the UAW-three. Did you hear the reports that the UAW is sabotaging Explorers and Aviators today?

          Reply
          • AvatarJohn C.

            The J car had to be many things to many people. A Chevy had to be sold close to break even while pricing like Omni or Escort. A Buick had to be quiet and smooth and offer all the niceties to old folks coming from bigger cars. A Pontiac had to build excitement with 5 speeds and OHC. A Vauxhall J had to show front drive 4 wheel irs to traveling salesman used to crude Pinto suspension and Marinas.The Isuzu J and the Daewoo J had to give Asians what ever it is that they look for in cars. Sorry I have no idea what that is and I bet neither do Asian manufacturers. They only think of us.
            Doing all of these things pretty darn well requires much more expertise than what Honda was up to.

          • AvatarCJinSD

            Honda wasn’t crippled by having to reserve various desirable characteristics for rebadged variants of the same car. They could get away with making one version of the Accord that did everything better than any variant of the J-car.

          • Avatarstingray65

            John – you forgot the J for Cadillac to compete with BMW and MB. Unfortunately, all your J examples only demonstrate the bad state of GM management at that time, as none of the J’s were really successful in their mission. The Cavalier was an awful appliance and never made a profit, the Pontiac J wasn’t exciting, and the Cimarron was an over-priced Cavalier until just before they cancelled it. None of them offered an engine or manual gearbox that matched the smoothness of a Honda, or the overall build quality of any Japanese car of the time. Perhaps the only area where the J’s beat the Japanese was in rust-proofing, but customers had to suffer anemic acceleration and get beat up by their excessive noise, vibration, and harshness for years to find out.

          • AvatarJohn C.

            Stingray, I purposely left off the Cimarron to give you or CJ something to come back about. Plus then I would have to talk of the unique bonus given payable in torque that came from offering the 2.8 V6 in such a small car. I understand talk of traditional American torque can be so upsetting as our foreign friends never offered it. Even when much later they got around to V6, all the torque was carefully edited out by using OHC. Meanwhile GM was in there offering their front drive small block for the eighties starting in 79. Even Chrysler had to wait for Mitsubishi and Ford had to wait till 1988 to offer comparable.

            Next from CJStingray, the joys of clear coat paint….

          • AvatarJohn C.

            Texn, I would prefer to think of my self as crazy like a fox. Realistically though more like a crazy old coot still fighting yesterdays long lost wars.

        • Avatardejal

          What political movement was I a part of?

          Back in the late 80’s my father bought an Accord. I was on my 2nd one at that point. We pull into a self service gas station to fill his car up. I’m pumping and a guy comes up and says “You know, we fought those people in the war.” My dad gets out and says “Yeah, I know, I spent 3 years in the Pacific driving landing craft. What unit were you in?” The guy walked away. That kind of political movement?

          He endured “those” people firing weapons at him. He didn’t hold a grudge. I’ll take his point of view over yours trying to label him and me with something that you won’t explain.

          Reply
          • AvatarJohn C.

            Dejal, when you and your Grandpa noticed later Accords becoming so much larger, were you disappointed. When you noticed the ever lower hoodlines reverse course, did you feel disappointment. When the stick shifts became ever less common, did you feel betrayed. If you instead thought they were doing what they had to taking over the mainstream commuter then you and him proved yourself part of a political movement. We want our money going there not here. It doesn’t matter what they build, the important thing was where the money went.

          • AvatarCJinSD

            Unlike Detroit, Honda learned and grew over the past fifty years. The first car they exported to the US was the N600. It was a bigger displacement version of the N360, which was a tiny Kei-class car. That’s the sandbox Honda was playing in because they’d only recently graduated to making multiple-cylinder motorcycles. They also messed around with some fairly exotic air-cooled four cylinder cars that were rife with motorcycle engineering.

            The Civic was Honda’s first water cooled car. It was relatively conventional and had twice the displacement and cylinders of the N600 it replaced in the US. Although bigger than the N600, it was still smaller than almost any other car on the US market.

            The first Accord was a logical next step, being as big as competing subcompacts in a growing segment. Why should they have stopped there? Why not keep making bigger and better cars that appealed to more of the market? Did they owe the thugs and incompetents of Detroit a living? If you want Honda’s money to stay in the US, where they do most of their production of cars and trucks, research and development of cars and trucks, and most of their sales of cars and trucks; buy their stock. It trades on the NYSE.

            You should like their cars now, as they have a big presence in China and lots full of 1.5T and 2.0T Chinese compliance cars like your Geely-Volvo. I’ll buy a Toyota or Lexus next time.

          • AvatarJohn C.

            Notice the talk quickly changes from how great early Hondas were to how natural the chain of events were. This is because the Hondas were nothing special The first Civic was an embarrassment compared to a Mini or a Fiat 128 that came out years before. Notice both also far outlasted the disposable first Civic. The important thing about them was that they started the political movement to destroy makers by giving political opponents a place to spend their car dollar. Honda’s only real point.

          • AvatarCJinSD

            The Honda was better than the Mini or 128 in many obvious ways. The engines started out smoother and more durable and then improved from there. When emissions controls became important in the US, but not the ECM, Honda responded with the CVCC engine. Meanwhile the Mini stayed stuck in the ’50s. The FIAT 128 was a nice design poorly made. The first Civic was a conventional but up to date car made in a clean room.

            When you say they outlasted the Civic, do you mean they stayed in production longer? So what? The Mini played a major role in the demise of the British car industry. The 128 was sold as a Zastava and reskinned as various FIATs, but it wasn’t up to date any longer than the Civic was. They certainly didn’t have service lives that remotely approached that of the Honda. You’ve got to admire the cheek of BL, who would sell you a car that looked just like the car you had that replaced the used up and rusted out one that had replaced an identical new car you bought before that when it was too rusty to bother fixing the mechanicals. There were more Morris Minor survivors in Europe when I lived there in 1984 than there were Minis with external door hinges and sliding windows. The Minors were all Traveler wagons, which may have been why they were saved. The oldest Minis was 1275GTs from the ’70s. There were people swapping Cooper S mechanicals into fresh shells, but that’s more of a reflection that BL was making lower performing versions of the same car in 1984 than they were in 1964. As a car enthusiast and admirer of quality, I’m extremely grateful for pre-Chinese-hegemony Honda.

            When you say that it was a political movement to destroy Detroit, it makes me wonder whose side you’re on. The Ford Foundation isn’t a force for good. They hate the constitution as much as George Soros does. Do you like the UAW, which supports the Democrats; a party that could be more accurately described as socialists, communists, fascists, pedophiles, liars, and anti-Christians? Why would I want my money to fund my domestic enemies? Why do you?

          • AvatarJohn C.

            Minicars begin and end with space utilization. The Mini and the Fiat were smaller on the outside and bigger on the inside than the first Civic. It does not matter if your less than 60 hp comes from an OHC or OHV engine. It is still slow. The lifespan of an early C engine Honda is more in common with Fiat than the A. Unless you do all, and I mean all the maintenance by the book. Like a rich guy does, who is only driving one to make a political point.

            Interesting Honda never tried to sell the USA another minicar when the Civic grew for 1980. Like a step for a political movement, rather than serving a clientele.

          • AvatarCJinSD

            Have you been in any of these cars, or even seen them? The Fiat 128 was a foot longer than the Civic and rode a ten inch longer wheelbase. I hope it was bigger inside. That four scrawny people could be folded into a Mini was impressive because it was the size of a children’s toy. It was not remotely as roomy or comfortable as a Civic, which was almost twenty inches longer. Maybe your real interest is wasting people’s time, since you would surely know more about cars than you do if you cared about them.

          • AvatarDirt Roads

            I don’t really have enough opinion of Hondas back in the day, but I can tell you I’m 6’6″ tall and have owned many, many Fiat 128 cars. I fit in them fine, but I was also younger and more fit than I am lo these 30-odd years later. They were cheap to buy, fun to drive, and had Italian steel *shrug* But did I mention they were fun to drive? 🙂

            I worked on some CVCCs back in the day and all I could think when opening the hood is Uncle Kobiyashi (or whomever, fake name) must have had a tubing factory and sold Uncle Honda a bunch of it for cheap. What a mess.

        • AvatarRonnie Schreiber

          Niche? My father replaced his ’74 Mercury Marquis Brougham with an ’84 Accord hatchback. It had nothing to do with politics or spitting at the establishment. The 2nd gen Accord was simply a well-built great car that provided good value for the price. It was well-equipped, fun to drive, and as reliable as a refrigerator.

          Reply
          • AvatarRonnie Schreiber

            ” The first Civic was an embarrassment compared to a Mini or a Fiat 128 that came out years before.”

            In what universe? The first Civic had a modern overhead cam engine that was dead reliable while the Mini had an ancient A-series pushrod unit that didn’t even have a crossflow head, and it shared its lubrication with the transmission, not something great for either engine or transmission reliability. I love the original Mini, there’s a ’63 Cooper sitting about 15 feet from where I type, but it was barely a car and despite Sir Alec’s genius, it was very primitive in many ways. Tiny ten inch wheels. No winding windows, no insulation in the doors. Hell, there weren’t even interior door handles, you yanked on a wire.

            As for the Fiat 128, while it was a pioneer in terms of the modern transverse FWD layout, Japanese quality was far ahead of what the Italians were doing at the time. While anything not made in America back then rusted badly you can still find first gen Civics for sale here. Just try to find a 128. And yes, the Civic was a more modern, sophisticated car than the 128, which still had a dash-mounted choke control.

          • AvatarJohn C.

            Sounds like he got a nice long life out of the Marquis. Gosh, how could that have happened amongst all the strife. I bet the neighbors in Detroit loved the Accord and all it stood for. I suspect given where you live, there might have been a political point to bringing it into the belly of the beast,

          • AvatarRonnie Schreiber

            Just how much do you know about Detroit area car culture? I’ve lived around Detroit my entire life and the cars I’ve regularly driven have included Swedish, British, German, and Japanese branded cars (along with some Chevy’s, FoMoCo products and an AWD Chrysler minivan that was very cool but had a transmission apparently made of cardboard). I’ve never heard a word or gotten a sideways glance about driving foreign cars. There were VWs and European Ford Capris on our block before my dad bought a Honda.

          • AvatarJohn C.

            So interesting, no Accords till 84. Just the youthful foreign stuff patronized by college bound youth secure in the knowledge that they won’t have to actually rely on a plant job like those former sharecroppers across town.

            Hey Youthful Ronnie, I hear Michael Moore is going to give us his Roger bad schtick in Flint and then we are all going to the riverside and piss in the water supply. Road Trip, do you think you can borrow the Accord. Its so embarrassing to do that and then have then get in a Marquis, I always think of the diamond cutter, its like Dad is being buzzkill right there in the car with us.

  6. AvatarE. Bryant

    “At some point, things will come to a boil somewhere and some charismatic gang leader is going to decide that his sicarios are more than a match for the SWAT teams of Des Moines or Apple Valley.”

    Yep. It’s only a question of tactics – will this be a matter of vastly superior numbers being used to overwhelm an opponent (old-fashioned but still effective), or an application of fourth-generation insurgency warfare? Door #1 seems like the obvious choice, but there are many more recent examples of the second option.

    I don’t think that further militarization of domestic police forces is our best option, although that will be the first choice, especially in urban areas. I’d like to think that rural areas will simply take care of themselves, especially if local sheriffs are willing to help coordinate defensive activities (or at the very least, look the other way).

    “The videos posted by the cartel members also show everything from F-250-mounted heavy machine guns to M249 Squad Assualt Weapons to M72 LAWS anti-tank rockets. Regardless of what you might hear on CNN, you can’t get any of that stuff at Wal-Mart or even at that one kind of scary gun store with the “MOLON LABE” stickers.”

    I’d like to think that if we could get that sort of hardware without jumping through hoops, then maybe we would have little to fear from cartels.

    Reply
    • Avatarstingray65

      All this talk about guns and drugs is scary. I can’t wait until Beto gets elected and implements his plan to disarm the citizenry so that he can use his Spanish language skills to assure the safety of the immigrant drug runners crossing our open borders and thereby make peace with the drug cartels. It just wouldn’t be very welcoming to give racist citizens the means to take immigration and drug laws into their own hands, and makes much more sense to follow the example of our friends south of the border in leaving guns and law enforcement entirely in the hands of professionally trained and incorruptible police and military.

      Reply
    • AvatarGeorge Denzinger

      “I’d like to think that rural areas will simply take care of themselves, especially if local sheriffs are willing to help coordinate defensive activities (or at the very least, look the other way).”

      I’m guessing there’s not a big problem with meth in your area. We have all kinds of meth cookers in the counties just south of me, I’m pretty sure law enforcement is already looking the other way.

      Reply
  7. Avatarhank chinaski

    Did this story even hit mainstream outlets? It’s all Ukraine 24/7.
    The ghosts of Pershing and Villa are chuckling over tequilas right now.

    Mexico has always been corrupt and is a failed narco state.
    As long as the cheap stuff, scabs, parents of future Democrat voters, and fentanyl keep coming Norte, it’s all good. At some point, an American border town judge or politician (or his family) is going to get dismembered and end up on the pages of Breitbart. MS13 does dirty work too ugly for even the Zetas…..stuff that would make their Incan ancestors blush.

    I’m not keen on ( an even more) militarized police though. Getting shot in my home through a window is not on my bucket list, and all the easier for them to conduct no-knock red flag raids. Better yet, have President Tulsi bring the troops back from Whogivesafuckistan to patrol our own damn border. The whole point is not to become them.

    Reply
  8. AvatarMental

    Oh, the National Guard can absolutely operate within the borders of the US. They can also operate in a defensive capability, and the Sec Def can even pay for it as long as the aren’t executing a law enforcement action under the dept of defense.

    Title 32.
    https://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/32/902

    Hopefully the lawyers and planners have already figured out that papaerwork in anticipation of having to dispel cartel fighters from a border town.

    Reply
    • AvatarCJinSD

      The Obama regime saw arming the cartels as an opportunity to justify stripping the constitutional rights of law abiding American citizens. Cartel activity north of the border is kept quiet by the swamp as we speak.

      Reply
    • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

      What I meant was that the Mexican “National Guard” isn’t a part-time military that reports to the governor of a state, but rather a full-time military police detachment, if that makes sense.

      Reply
  9. Avatar-Nate

    Tough times ahead .

    Wait until the young folks have to set down their play stations, Et Al and begin to realize something’s gone seriously amiss .

    -Nate

    Reply
    • AvatarDirt Roads

      Hey wait a minute Nate, I’m over 60 and I have a PS4 🙂
      And I reload most of my own ammo, just sayin’….

      Reply
      • Avatar-Nate

        Good on you ! .

        I cannot get away from the TV so I never really learned to game .

        Reloading is a good thing to know, I did it too for decades, tried to interest my son but he just buys new….

        Your reply proved yet again that everyone is different and what you chose to do isn’t bad unless it hurts others.

        Now, go shoot some deer then make Bambi tacos and invite me over….

        =8-) .

        -Nate

        Reply
        • Avatar-Nate

          Our Foster boys have a multitude of games, Grand Theft Auto 5 (I think) has so many little side stories they can follow when they’re interested or get bored if the driving aspect .

          It even has plenty of local color in it ~ the other day they drove up to Griffith Observatory, had no idea what it is so I told them to get out of the car and walk around sure enough it’s the observatory and griffith park faithfully re created on the game box….

          -Nate

          Reply
          • AvatarPanzer

            GTA 5 isn’t supposed to be an accurate recreation of soCal, more a metaphorical representation of it, but still, i’ll take your word that Griffith Park is faithfully reproduced 👍

          • Avatar-Nate

            If you lived here you’d recognize many many streets, buildings and so on .

            Yes, when you look at the huge overview map it’s not the same but once on the actual playing course it’s all there bit by bit .

            I’ve never played it, I’ll just be passing by and instantly recognize a place, street or whatever .

            I assume (?) that there are different cites within the game and other cities will use NYC, Chicago and so on as templates….

            It’s fascinating to me, if I had the time I’d just tool around and seek out things to look at .

            -Nate

  10. Avatarroamer

    Jack, don’t really have any comment about the Mexico situation as I agree with your post. I am wondering what you think about the recent purchase of Bimota by Kawasaki. Bimota’s just a name without a factory at this point, but there’s a history of high performance and innovation in design and engineering there; it could be interesting to see if Kawasaki chooses to let their creative flag fly, so to speak…(Hell yes, I’ll buy a Tesi with the ZX-10 motor.)

    Reply

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