Messages From The Lizard People

Five months ago, a space of time which today seems almost paleontological, I found myself explaining the Lizard People to my boss, Mr. Larry Webster. I was driving Larry’s newly-acquired ’94 Mustang Cobra in some rather dicey weather, chatting with him about various personages in the automotive world, and I said something like, “Well, he’s one of the Lizard People.”

“The what?” So I had to break it down for him. Wikipedia will tell you that the Lizard People are part of a very serious conspiracy theory, but Wikipedia has SJW-policed itself into utter irrelevance lately; witness their entry for Boogaloo. Nobody (alright, almost nobody) thinks that interstellar reptiles have taken human form among our country’s leaders. Rather, the Lizard People theory is a hyperbolic way to express something which we all know to be true, namely: virtually everyone in our country’s “one percent” is at least a sociopath and possibly a psychopath.

They don’t think like we do — not even close. The majority of them were blessed with some haystack-needle combination of personal circumstance and professional luck. People who were born on third base, think they hit a triple, then manage to steal home because the catcher has a heart attack. To avoid facing the unpleasant (to them) fact of their lottery-winner existence, they eagerly consume (and produce) countless utterly generic diatribes on meritocratic-sounding skills like “leadership”, “vision”, “success”, and similar topics. Carly Fiorina, known in most circles as the woman who single-handedly destroyed Hewlett-Packard, has written three bestselling motivational books. Chew on that for a minute. This woman literally ran an American institution into the ground, causing tens of thousands of people to lose their jobs and destroying billions of dollars in shareholder value — and she thinks she’s a tremendous success. That’s psychopathic behavior.

Let me be clear: I’m not talking about the kind of fellow who grinds through medical school, starts his own practice, and rewards himself with a McLaren Senna GTR at the age of fifty. I’m not talking about Steve Wozniak or even Steve Jobs. I’m not talking about Larry’s boss, McKeel Hagerty, who took a neighborhood insurance agency and built a billion-dollar company through meticulous attention to detail. I’m talking about all those people who earn six or seven figures in ill-defined, completely unproductive jobs. The marketing gurus, the “Silicon Valley wizards” who have never shipped a memorable product, pretty much every MD and above in the finance business (except, ahem, this one chick I know). The people who sit on eight corporate boards and nobody knows why. The CEOs who shipped jobs overseas to make a quarterly earnings call look good, the people at Boeing who managed to trash the world’s best brand in a matter of years. The Lizard People.

Real Lizard People are a lot easier to discern than their sci-fi counterparts. Witness, if you will, the above video.

The video isn’t what the lizards think; it’s what they expect you to think. So if you want to know how highly the lizards esteem normal human beings, just click “Play” while considering the fact that, as The Last Psychiatrist used to say… if you’re watching it, it’s for you.

The Lizard People aren’t quite sure what to do about this pandemic. They expect to profit from it, of course; their assets will rise in price faster than the cost-of-living increases they’ll have to give their employees, and many of them have capitalized on the pinch hitting the middle class at the moment. They expect to profit from it politically — the majority of billionaires now lean left, as opposed to twenty years ago when they leaned right, and they see this crisis as their sole remaining chance at preventing a “Trumpslide” in 2020.

Our opinion-forming class — media, celebrities, academics — serve as a sort of clergy to the Lizard People so it’s no surprise to see them assisting in the creation of completely insecure (make that insincere—JB) tripe like the commercials collected above. It’s also worthwhile to note that our modern corporate “team norms” enforce a uniformity which would have shocked any cleric in the Middle Ages. We no longer permit even the mild expression of dissenting opinion in most corporate jobs — what you say is far less important than how you say it. No wonder the commercials are all the same; they come from people who have been forcibly pounded into compliance with a very restrictive set of possible beliefs and values.

Meanwhile, we have CNN Brian openly sobbing for his “life before the pandemic”. Note that Brian earns well over a million dollars a year in a job where he doesn’t have to wear “PPE” or mop floors. Note that he will continue to earn that kind of money as long as he is willing to read the Lizard People line to a camera. For what, precisely, is he sobbing?

I’ll tell you: he is sobbing for the lack of international travel, the lack of three-Michelin-star restaurants, the lack of cocktail parties in Manhattan co-ops. He is sobbing because the corporate jet is grounded. He is sobbing because he can’t go to Vail. In other words, Brian is crying because his life now looks more like the average American life did before the pandemic. How many of you went overseas last year? How many of you have been on a corporate jet? How many of you regularly spend more than $200 a plate on dinner? He’s openly sobbing for the loss of that. Meanwhile, many of my readers are out of work entirely, while others are taking serious risks in the medical or other “essential” fields.

The fact that Brian isn’t the least bit self-conscious about this privileged breakdown should tell you how lizard-like he is. He has no idea what’s happening outside his penthouse. Nor, I suspect, do most of the Lizard People. Which is why none of them want to “reopen the economy”. They’re all collecting their checks and the people who serve them are “essential”. This attitude, I believe, will very shortly come back to to haunt some, or all, of them.

I could be wrong about all of this. It should be pointed out that after I delivered my careful and nuanced explanation of Lizard-People-As-Metaphor to Larry, he scrunched his brow for a moment, then replied, “Nah, I don’t believe that. Most people are pretty great, if you give them a chance.” I watched his eyes for the telltale flick of a nictitating membrane, but they were clear and bright. What I wouldn’t give to wake up tomorrow with that kind of positive attitude. Which raises a valid point: Can the Lizard People really harm you if you simply don’t believe they exist?

76 Replies to “Messages From The Lizard People”

  1. AvatarRick Soloway

    you need to reset the “Lizard People” link to the video you cited. It currently links to the same Larry Webster nice write up about sharing your classic car experience with others.

    Reply
  2. Avatarsnorlax

    Small correction: Carly Fiorina wrecked at least three great companies (HP, Compaq and Digital) by my count, and indirectly did a number on Intel.

    See also Steve Ballmer, one of the all time worst CEOs, who ran the greatest company in the world into the ground, and is the ninth richest man in America ($52 billion) for his trouble.

    Reply
    • Avatarscotten

      At that level, there is little/no penalty for failure. I’m guessing having been in those roles makes a person more employable rather than less (I’m looking at you, Carly). It’s a “resume booster”.

      Reply
    • AvatarStanding in the Shadows

      Carly Fiorina wrecked FOUR companies. Before she went to HP and wrecked it, she wrecked Lucent by changing the rules about how commissions were paid so that she could collect commissions on hardware that she hadn’t done the work of selling, being sold to customers who would never have the money and never actually buy the hardware they had “promised” to buy years in the future. The only reason why it wasn’t fraud is that she got to write the rules that it wasn’t, and she made sure that enough of the people who were supposed to be watching for that sort of thing were “getting paid” as well.

      Reply
    • AvatarFrank Galvin

      Compaq was seriously bleeped at the time HP came along. They’d acquired DEC in ’98, and tried to figure out how to integrate the Massachusetts tech conglomerate into their Texas worldview world. Didn’t take so well. Mass layoffs, selling of some of DEC’s most valuable hardware and patents. In the end, the piece of DEC worth most to Compaq was a service operation, and that division was hemorrhaging brain and managerial power long before the HP buyout.

      Reply
      • Avatarsnorlax

        I wasn’t trying to imply that Compaq and/or DEC were under particularly competent management before Fiorina came into the picture. But I think they would probably still exist if not for her.

        Reply
        • AvatarJohn C.

          I am not saying that Carly was great, but I think she, a long ago figure, is only being included to avoid the racial white elephant that all the others imply. Notice for example none of the legion of lousy Indian CEOs are getting singled out.

          Reply
          • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

            That’s because nobody can think of a great one with which to contrast them.

          • AvatarMopar4wd

            Nadella makes Microsoft a boatload of Money. Don’t agree with alot of what he has done (I really hate the subscription software model) but he is damn good at making money.

          • AvatarJohn C.

            At my postage stamp site, I wrote up Tata, who built the largest steel mill in the British Empire. Two problems though, he was a Parsi, who were Zoroastrians on the run from Muslim Persia, so not really Indian. Second was that was 110 years ago so almost as out of date as Carly

    • AvatarAleksey

      I have been pounding the drum on the “Steve Ballmer was a giant failure” bandwagon for at least the last ten years, and most informed people have replied to me with nary a “meh”. He ran Microsoft and Nokia into the ground simultaneously. His only saving grace has been a genuinely visionary CEO who followed him (Satya Nadella) who has produced fantastic results since taking over from Steve-O.

      Reply
  3. Avatarstingray65

    CNN should be crying for the time when they had viewers who chose to watch them (versus being forced to at airports) and thought they actually reported news (rather than Leftist opinion). So called journalists are being laid off left and right because very few are willing to pay money for the fake news they sell, nor advertise on channels with so few eyeballs watching. But rather than reassess and do some soul searching they just continue to lurch further Left, which is not a great strategy when less than 20% of the public is Leftist. The Constitution, western culture, academia, journalism…are there any formerly respected institutions that Leftists aren’t actively trying to destroy?

    Reply
        • Avatarscotten

          Well I think CNN was claiming that Tesla hadn’t shipped ventilators and Mr. Musk replied with a list of those that were delivered along with pictures of hospital staff giving thanks.

          Reply
        • AvatarJohn C.

          Interesting Musk is lumped in with these lizard people for building cars and ventilators and rockets and solar roof tiles in America. I am very sensitive that a country should get the credit for what they built. So that might lead to an uncomfortable talk of apartheid era South Africa. Musk had to abandon who he was and where he came from to contribute what he has to the USA, not Holland, nor Australia, nor New Zealand who were all offering homes to their cousins left in a tough spot by the change in South Africa. I am all for sneering at lizard people but lets not throw our cousins in who are still doing things for our Anglosphere in with the lizard infestation. Otherwise we are left with just the lizards and and the glorious diversity for the Asians to mop up after we are gone

          Reply
          • AvatarTrucky McTruckface

            “Musk had to abandon who he was and where he came from to contribute what he has to the USA.”

            Abandon who he was? He still has the accent that makes him sound like a villain from Lethal Weapon 2.

            Which is funny, because your postings sound like drunken Mel Gibson.

            “I am all for sneering at lizard people but lets not throw our cousins in who are still doing things for our Anglosphere in with the lizard infestation.”

            Anglosphere? Cousins? Do you realize that you’re That Guy waiving the Confederate battle flag or spouting some bullshit blaming Jews that the media latches onto so everyone else who opposes progressive fascism, government overreach, or the globalist looting of America as a racist asshole?

            Fuck off before your singlehandedly get this site placed on SPLC’s list of hate groups.

          • AvatarJohn C.

            Trucky, don’t let yourself be intimidated by the Southern Poverty Law Center. They are frauds who don’t give one of their rat’s asses for the hurtin man in the black belt.

  4. AvatarRobert

    I’ve been curious about this for a long time…if the Lizard People “earn six or seven figures in ill-defined, completely unproductive jobs”, and I believe that to be true, how is that sustainable? How can any business survive that much dead weight?

    The technology company I started my career with 20 years ago was delightfully lizard free and full of smart, hard working professionals…until the owner cashed out and we were acquired by a soulless, big money backed conglomerate that was staffed with lizards from top to bottom. After every encounter I had with their C suite I was baffled that any of them had risen to such levels of income and authority, they weren’t good at anything other than bullshitting their ways onto boards and C suites as far as I could tell.

    Reply
    • AvatarMopar4wd

      Large companies make enough money that baseline workers and a few competent people near the top can drag alot of dead weight. See most insurance companies.

      Reply
    • AvatarArk-med

      This asymmetry in organizational productivity was formalized by physicist Derek Price, as Price’s law — in generalized form: Half of the work is done by the square root of the total number of people who participate in said work. It can reasonably be surmised that those who usurp the most credit and derive the maximum mileage from that work are not derived from that small, productive fraction of the workgroup.

      Reply
  5. AvatarLynnG

    Thank you Jack for putting a name to some of the people I have had to work with in 40 years in both the public and private sector. At the begining of my work life, I was young and inexperienced enought to see some of what worked and what did not in retail and logistics and when I would speak up at meetings I would be brushed off as having no experience. At the end of my work life, when I pointed out to the Chairman that the corporation was losing its best and brightest people as a result of all and I do mean all (14 of 14) internal promotions going to “diversity candidates” as opposed to those that got things done. I was branded a _____, well we won’t go there. So Jack you hit it on the head, some people at the top only get there by the luck of the draw, ivy league friendship, or living in the right neighborhood. Be careful out there and this to shall pass….

    Reply
    • Avatarstingray65

      Wait – are you implying that the practice of telling certain people they are victims and deserve promotions based only on their skin pigment, gender, or sexual orientation doesn’t make them work harder or smarter and more valuable to the success of the organization? Does this mean that hiring and promoting on the basis of superficial diversity is no more effective in achieving a meritocratic organization than hiring and promoting Ivy League legacy admissions born with a silver spoon in their mouths? Should HR be informed that superficial diversity is not a strength?

      Reply
    • Avatardejal

      Yeah, but not as much. Took a “small” large pile and legitimately made a large one. With him you got “More” Of course connections with the right people help. He has taken a lot of “Meh” over the years and turned it into less “Meh”. And some turned out to be great.

      Reply
    • AvatarRonnie Schreiber

      Back when Daniel Akerson was running GM, having effectively been installed there by the Obama administration in the wake of the bailouts, it was clear he was not going to be the long term CEO and there was speculation about his successor. I was going to a press luncheon for the Detroit Grand Prix held at the Rattlesnake Club on the riverfront and I was hoping to be able to ask Roger Penske if he’d take the job. As it happened, I was walking down the street to the restaurant when Penske exited a big black SUV, so I asked him,

      “Roger, would you take the job?”

      “What job is that?”

      “Running General Motors.”

      “Oh, no,” he laughed. “I’m having too much fun doing what I’m doing, It looks like they do have a good succession plan in place.”

      Reply
  6. AvatarCJinSD

    “Nah, I don’t believe that. Most people are pretty great, if you give them a chance.”

    We’re more than fifty years into being a progressive one party state with a sold-out political class playing divide and conquer to serve patrons who are our foreign ideological enemies and billionaires whose avariciousness can only be satisfied by eliminating the middle class to make themselves feel richer. The idea that there is still someone above the age of six who thinks all people are pretty great is disorienting in its alien nature.

    My client at Bear Stearns was an improbably beautiful woman, far more attractive in person than the various movie stars I’ve met including Michelle Pfeiffer, Alicia Silverstone, Denise Richards, and Mila Kunis. She could have used a car service to get to work every day, or at least a cab in and a car service home like I usually did. Instead, she took the subway with the frottage enthusiasts, the dirty hobos, the pick pockets, the lepers, and other assorted New Yorkers. Her biggest complaint was that sometimes she saw people eating in public, which she found undignified. Otherwise, she thought New York City was plumb full of the friendliest panoply of humanity to be found. Everyone was nice to her and smiled because she was so beautiful.

    Reply
    • AvatarJoe

      See the movie Liar, Liar…

      “I don’t know why everybody is so nice to me…”

      Jim Carrey may be one of the Lizards but his reply is hilarious.

      Reply
  7. AvatarTrucky McTruckface

    “Nah, I don’t believe that. Most people are pretty great, if you give them a chance.”

    People like your boss are the reason Lizard People thrive.

    Just look at Ohio, where Governor Bilbo Baggins, er Mike Dewine, is living out his paternalistic wet dreams. This insufferable RINO, who’s spent his entire adult life in “public service,” is narcissistically carrying out one of the strictest lockdowns and slowest “reopenings” outside of the coastal states. But Ohioans think it’s JUST FUCKIN’ DANDY. People around here…”conservative” people…look forward to his tedious daily pressers. They call it “Wine with DeWine.” I suppose they’re bamboozled by the folksy crap like his wife’s craft suggestions for while you sit around unemployed, and ignore his Lizard smirk in response to the rare occasions when the local “journalists” ask him about civil liberties.

    Lizard People are able to run roughshod because these people willfully allow it. They keep electing them, keep buying their products, and keep submitting to their media. They’ve taken this overblown pandemic at face value. About the only thing they’ll ever push back on is you when you attempt to pop their bubble of ignorance.

    Who’s worse? The Lizards, or the people that believe their bullshit?

    Reply
    • AvatarJohn C.

      We have it the opposite in Georgia. We officially reopened over the weekend but not ten percent of things reopened. Even though my city has had few cases. Don’t underestimate how freaked out so many are and are comforted by the news conferences. Who knew the growth profession in the country were those funny mimes signing and dancing to the side of pols. Even our mayor has one.

      Reply
  8. AvatarKevin Jaeger

    Slightly off topic, but it looks like the Lizard People may be leading to an early resolution to our bet on the unemployment rate. I don’t think either of us envisioned these circumstances but at this rate you may win the bet in the next few weeks.

    Reply
  9. AvatarShortest Circuit

    I’d argue Ginny Rometty pretty much turned IBM from a ‘we made it all, from hardware to software and services’ into your typical Indian call-centre service provider, but actually IBM’s downfall began before her tenure, so it would be unfair.
    I find it enjoyable how the fourth estate is clambering for attention now that they lost pretty much 90% of their media presence. Movie theaters, regular theaters closed, they only have TVs left, because no-one could figure out how to start a youtube channel, god forbid they had to compete against a 21-year old wearing crocheted caps. Now they realize they had been turned into walking empty-shell sneaker commercials that can be replaced by the next up-and-coming nobody waiting around the corner. I now root for that guy that commented under the “Imagine” video that whoever wrote that song should be shot.

    Reply
  10. AvatarPaulyG

    Well, I guess I am a lizard person since I was a senior managing director at a big Wall Street investment bank (and for the bigots who comment on this website, Jewish). I think this is one of these generalizations that look great at 50,000 feet but not on the ground. I grew up in a modest neighborhood and worked my ass off in college and in the working world for many years. In fact, most of the highly successful people I associate with or worked with came from similarly modest backgrounds. Investment banks actually want income producers, not dead weight. People without safety nets (trust funds) tend to work pretty hard although I know several people with safety nets that have done great things for humanity by working their respective asses off.

    The problem is that you don’t see us, we live low profile lives, serving on not-for-profit boards, helping others get ahead while running our businesses. Maybe I have a Porsche, but it is an older one, not the blinged out one with more writing on the engine hatch than War and Peace.

    What you do see are the publicity mongers. They are their brand. The Brian Stelter brand, for example. He wants you to know what his brand stands for. But like so many clothes detergents, he needs to keep advertising his brand or you will forget about him as his product can easily be replaced with another generic product. But in reality, there is no there, there. He is observing, not doing. He is a “Thought Leader”.

    Nassim Taleb has a wonderful term IYI, Intellectual Yet Idiot, the seems to embrace this world of no-skin-in-the-game grifters: https://medium.com/incerto/the-intellectual-yet-idiot-13211e2d0577

    Reply
    • Avataryossarian

      nah, i see you. heck i’m probably related to you. upton sinclair said it best, “It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends on his not understanding it.”

      Reply
    • AvatarJohn C.

      Well as long as you serve on non profit boards, and your Porsche is out of date, who are we to begrudge you a few bailouts for your firm and the devastation of your clients portfolios. You built your business, it doesn’t make anything, doesn’t employ anyone outside your tribe, but it gives you your pile. After all you take your percentage good times and bad..

      Congratulations on your achievements, Naturally you deserve them, to not just hand them over would be racist. As you know there are racists all around you who even have the gal to think themselves better than you. I know I do. What fools.

      Reply
      • AvatarPaulyG

        Bigot #1, spewing his bile, right on cue. This is like catching fish in a barrel.

        You know little of my background, you have no clue about what I have done with my life, you have no understanding of my political leanings, but I am Jewish, so I am the devil.

        I will give you a taste to satisfy your virulent antisemitism. I have never been bailed out and no firm while I was there was bailed out. I risked substantially all of my net worth for over 25 years building businesses that, shockingly to you, included non-Jews as partners. My customers are not individuals so they have no religion. Taking personal risk is called skin in the game. If I screw up badly enough, I lose everything. A lot of people are unwilling to do that.

        I am sorry your life did not turn out the way you wanted. Look in the mirror and be honest with yourself for once. Stop blaming others and the boogeyman for your shortcomings. Take stock of your strengths and maybe do something that helps out the greatest country in the world. I know I try to. Put on some big boy pants and be a man for once.

        Reply
        • AvatarJohn C.

          Gosh more name calling but I am the racist, Got it Thanks.

          Were you standing on the corner smoking a cigarette when your firm was bailed out? How many times was it bailed out 1998, 2001, 2008, 2020.

          I am touched that your firm hires a gentile here and there. I am sure they feel they have an equal chance of success as all the Jews around them in a country 2 percent Jewish. In Bismarck era Germany, it was common to hire a threadbare no pride nobleman to front for a Jewish firm. What a wasteful expense. I guess with all that bailout money, there was no need to keep a close eye on expenses.

          Reply
          • AvatarPaulyG

            Can you do subtraction? 2020-25 years = what year?

            I love when an antisemite pretends not to be one. Be a man and just wear it proudly for all the world to see. You are not the first nor will you be the last one I ever meet.

            And stop wasting your time worrying about Jews and do something substantial with your life.

          • AvatarJohn C.

            It is not my job to tell people how great the Jewish man is. Just like it is not my job with the Asian man or the black man. Don’t worry Ronnie does a great job for your people here all the time. I enjoy reading him when he does. Do I think my ethnicity, paternaly English and maternally German is the best. Of course, we all should think that. I am completely certain you do.

            When will it be enough though so leaches like you stop casually throwing around charges that prove you are ever of the sewer? The USA took in your ancestors from Europe when they were in a rough spot. The USA sent US Navy Skyhawks off their carriers to Israel when Egypt outperformed expectations. The Fed had taken the money of this 70 percent white Christian nation and had fellow Jews hand it to you to take the other side so you can short sell our country. Yet here comes the billionaire with his grievances. It is my understanding that Jews don’t believe in Hell. I do.

          • AvatarPaulyG

            “It is not my job to tell people how great the Jewish man is. Just like it is not my job with the Asian man or the black man. Don’t worry Ronnie does a great job for your people here all the time. I enjoy reading him when he does. Do I think my ethnicity, paternaly English and maternally German is the best. Of course, we all should think that. I am completely certain you do.

            When will it be enough though so leaches like you stop casually throwing around charges that prove you are ever of the sewer? The USA took in your ancestors from Europe when they were in a rough spot. The USA sent US Navy Skyhawks off their carriers to Israel when Egypt outperformed expectations. The Fed had taken the money of this 70 percent white Christian nation and had fellow Jews hand it to you to take the other side so you can short sell our country. Yet here comes the billionaire with his grievances. It is my understanding that Jews don’t believe in Hell. I do.”

            Wow, that is some anger you have pent up in there. You seem to have every trope going tonight! “My” country saved your people by taking them in (and we have not contributed anything since then, I guess), dual loyalties (saving Israel; my relatives fighting in Europe in WW1 and WW2, doing their small part to save Western Civilization does not count), short selling our country (disloyalty). That is the beauty of antisemitism, it is the shape shifting prejudice that fits whatever is “other”.

            Am I proud to be Jewish? Yes. Do I think I am superior to everyone else. Not at all, I was raised much better than that. I believe all people have something useful to contribute to society, even you. You seem to think I have grievances. I actually am very thankful to be living in this great country. I just don’t have a lot of time for bigotry. You seem to see conspiracy everywhere. It must be a horrible way to live.

            Do yourself a favor and take a walk outside. Think about how, starting tomorrow, you can make the USA a better place.

          • AvatarJohn C.

            Notice Pauli did not argue that he was a billionaire. Instead he argued that he loves the other guy. I freely admit who I am so this sewer man can try to destroy me. If he does, Remember! Who is the bad guy?

          • AvatarRonnie Schreiber

            In Bismarck era Germany, it was common to hire a threadbare no pride nobleman to front for a Jewish firm. What a wasteful expense.

            If it wasn’t for a Jewish businessman and racer, Adolph Rosenberger, who put up all of the money for the design firm in the early 1930s, there wouldn’t be a Porsche company today.

          • AvatarJohn C.

            Thanks for putting a name to that history. I knew there must have been some Jewish involvement at Porsche based on some of the suppliers used post war and the fact that Dr. Porsche was only slapped on the wrist for being German after the war. You can’t say the front men didn’t pull their weight. When your Adolf went into rich man exile, was he cashed out by that other Adolf?

          • AvatarRonnie Schreiber

            When your Adolf went into rich man exile, was he cashed out by that other Adolf?

            No, he was arrested by the Gestapo and cheated out of his investment. Got any other questions you think are clever?

            Adolph Rosenberger, whose family owned movie theaters and who was a successful gentleman racer, having raced successfully for the Benz factory team in the 1920s, put up all of the money to start the Porsche design company in 1931. Dr. Porsche got 80% of the stock, Rosenberger got 10% and the remaining 10% went to Anton Piech, Dr. Porsche’s son in law. I’ll have to check my references but I believe the company was capitalized with 100,000 DM.

            In any case, after the Nazis came to power in 1933, Rosenberger was arrested for “race crimes”, which likely means he was banging his “Aryan” girlfriend. It is assumed that the Porsches used their influence to have him released from prison. Rosenberger then left Germany for France, where he represented the Porsche company. He briefly returned to Germany in 1935 and, under duress, sold his 10% share of the company to Ferry Porsche for just 5,000 DM when the company was making at least 100,000 DM/yr in profit.

            So much for your “rich man exile”.

            Rosenberger ended up in California, where he changed his name to Alan Roberts and opened up a collision and customization shop.

            After the war he tried suing Porsche as his sale of his shares was clearly not voluntary.Under the impression that his health was bad and that Rosenberger would not survive long, the Porsche family strung out the litigation, but in the end provided him with a VW Beetle as a token settlement.

            Rosenberger wasn’t the only Jew to have an important role in German automotive history. There was also Edmund Rumpler, a pioneering aerodynamicist, Joseph Ganz, who popularized the concept of a “volkswagen” peoples’ car, and Kurt Joachimson, who designed the classic BMW 315 and 328. Oh, and there’s also Siegfried Marcus, he was Austrian, not German, (but then so was the other Adolph) and is likely the first person to have powered a four wheeled vehicle with a gasoline engine sometime around 1870, quite a few years before Benz and Daimler. Per orders of the Reich’s Ministry for Propaganda, Marcus was literally written out of history books and replaced with Daimler and Benz as the inventors of the automobile.

          • AvatarJohn C.

            So in summation. Dr. Porsche got him out of jail for committing a then crime in Germany. He then made a salaried place for him in France. No doubt with all those profits he was also getting a dividend on his stock. He then nuttily goes back to Nazi Germany to get cashed out. Dr. Porsche again comes through with a cash offer for his stock. Then after accepting it, he waits impatiently for Dr. Porsche’s longer stay in jail for no crime to end and then sues Dr. Porsche’s descendants for the rest of his life. Sounds like a pretty typical rich man’s exile to me right down to the center building rich man toy hot rods as a hobby.

    • AvatarRonnie Schreiber

      PaulyG,

      I just finished Paul Midler’s Poorly Made in China, about his experiences as a go-between for American companies looking to manufacture in China. While you were working at that investment bank, how many of the bank’s corporate customers moved their supply chains to China? Did your firm go along with McKinsey’s shpiel that offshoring manufacturing was more economically efficient? Not trying to bust your balls, just trying to get a better perspective on why so much of America’s manufacturing base chased that particular dragon.

      Also, if you’re a regular reader here than you might know about my electric harmonica project. It’s currently suspended because prototype parts are sitting in a California factory, waiting for Gov. Newsome to let “non-essential” businesses to operate, but once things start up again, I could always use some venture capital. Want to help a landsmen out (and annoy some Jew haters?

      Speaking of which, not only have the Elders not sent me my check for my share of world domination, they won’t even tell me where and when the weekly meetings take place so I can learn which goyim I’m supposed to manipulate. You too?

      You didn’t happen to know the late Tony Glickman did you?

      Reply
      • AvatarPaulyG

        Ronnie:

        I was on the research side at the time so there was a “Chinese Wall” with the investment bankers so I really don’t have much insight there. However, I don’t think anyone had to advise companies too hard to convince them to source from China, it looked self-evidently cheaper both in labor and environmentally. And quite frankly, consumers loved cheaper everything at Wal Mart, even if the products were of lower quality. I am sure many corporations are now regretting the loss of IP to the Chinese but they do not get much sympathy from me. I have always been a staunch anti-communist and remember and hated the day we helped kick Taiwan out of the UN and decided the PRC was the “real” China.

        General management consultants typically have no skin in the game so I don’t have much regard for their advice. If you take their advice and it does not work out, they don’t refund their fees.

        My focus is in the bond area so I don’t know much about venture capital, so sorry on the potential investment opportunity.

        I did not know Tony Glickman, sorry.

        Yes, The Elders have been slow with checks and never even sent the Christian child’s blood I ordered to bake matzoh for Passover this year. At least they sent me a nice box to store my horns. (That is a joke, John C., they actually did not send me a box for my horns)

        And John C., just to clean up a few items before I tire of sport fishing and get back to work, I did not realize I needed to file a net worth disclose form with you to be on this website. My bad. Stop by anytime and I will show you my files so you may complete due diligence to your satisfaction.

        And in your perversion of history, John C., no Jews were involved in the imprisonment and release of Ferry Porsche Sr. According to the Porsche family, the French put the old man and his son-in-law in jail as a shakedown at the insistence of Renault after there was talk about Porsche producing the VW in France without Renault. The family paid 500,000 francs to have him released.

        Good luck with the stamp collection!

        Reply
  11. Avataryossarian

    i live and work among the lizard people.i tell myself that it’s worth it to feed my family and have some financial stability. fortunately, i’m on the overnight shifts when the hardcore psychopaths are home in bed so it’s tolerable. i often wonder what my co-workers think but i don’t have the guts to risk my job having an honest conversation with them. i think 98% of them believe what the b.s. all around us. these people are terrified. if i told them that these things happen periodically (e.g. 1968 hong kong flu) and that our lockdown is nothing but politics and pseudo-science, i think they would call security and escort me to the door.

    Reply
  12. AvatarNewbie Jeff

    For all interested, Dr’s Erickson/Massihi briefed their local media some of their own conclusions about Chinese BeerFlu… there are probably some holes in their findings, but more the most part it appears pretty sound, the doctors appear well qualified, and the data is widely available.

    The “problem” is their conclusions support immediately reopening the economy, that the initial reaction of mass shut downs was not data-driven, and that there’s data now that suggests that the lethality of Chinese BeerFlu is nowhere near the early dire estimates.

    The Lizard People at YouTube do NOT like this video. They are actively de-platforming videos of the presentation wherever they pop up… we’ll see how long this one lasts:

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=vJprwe_rWeM

    Reply
    • Avatarrambo furum

      Bitchute is where it can be found, even if their buffering is terrible. It was nice seeing some sane people discuss the Rona though.

      Reply
    • AvatarJohn C.

      I am not so sure of their findings. They dramatically quote the CA death percentage without adequate thought to the fact that death is a lagging indicator and there is a very large chance we are in an early inning of this. Hope for a hot summer.

      Reply
      • AvatarNewbie Jeff

        “I am not so sure of their findings. They dramatically quote the CA death percentage without adequate thought to the fact that death is a lagging indicator and there is a very large chance we are in an early inning of this. Hope for a hot summer.”

        …and skepticism is fair, especially when wanting to approach a problem with an open mind and a genuine desire to solve the problem.

        Note that this is not YouTube/Google’s approach… they’re removing videos from their site under the justification of some sort of “user guideline” violation. They actually provide a link to “Learn More”, and absolutely nothing in the video violates their criteria. They’re de-platforming the doctors simply because they can… Orwell was completely correct, he was just off by a couple of decades…

        Reply
  13. Avatar-Nate

    “those funny mimes signing and dancing to the side of pols. Even our mayor has one.”

    Wait, what ? I thought the gangs we’re supposed to be afraid of had taken over the TV news…..

    ” Look in the mirror and be honest with yourself for once. ”

    Are you kidding me ? that’s terrifying ~ looking the idiot who made my pathetic life what it is and controls my future in the face ?! there aren’t big boy pants large enough for that job …..

    As far as ‘most folks are pretty good’, maybe it depends on where you are ? .

    Here at the bottom in the Blue Collar World I keep meeting nice people, a large part of why I prefer to travel by ground using as many tertiary roads as I can .

    I don’t get antisemitism ~ Jews, like every other racial / cultural mix have good and bad people .

    I find that anyone who leans to wards fundamentalism of any sort, will either be or be attracted to and support, lizard types .

    Boot licking lizard supporter types flummox me .

    -Nate

    Reply
      • AvatarRonnie Schreiber

        Like I’ve said before, you’re welcome to boycott everything Jews have had a hand in developing, you’re just too much of a coward to act on your ideals.

        Reply
        • Avatarrambo furum

          I should take all the bad of the group and forfeit the little good of some individuals? Do you seriously think this is a brilliant gotcha tactic?

          I’ll certainly discuss whether the group has been a net loss for society or not. For the usury alone, I think it’s a no-brainer.

          Reply
          • AvatarRonnie Schreiber

            Millions of people lined up to take the Salk and Sabin polio vaccines, but I guess they were of little good. Perhaps if the vaccine developers had intact foreskins you could slobber over, they’d get your approbation.

            If Jewish contributions to society at large are of “little good” you should easily be able to find equivalent substitutes with no harm to yourself. No, you’re a lazy coward.

            Interesting how “bad” is attributed to the group while “good” is attributed to individuals. There’s no chance, I suppose, that group values and qualities might have contributed to individuals’ accomplishments.

          • Avatar-Nate

            ?! .

            It never occurred to me that my son might be an anti vaxxer because of antisemitism…….

            That’s beyond absurd and way into stupid landia .

            I’ll have to ask him later .

            ? Seriously, anyone would actually refuse to take a vaccine because it was developed by Jews ? .

            That sounds like a bad movie plot .

            -Nate

          • AvatarRick

            Wow. Rampant antisemitism in this thread, among other BS. I have to say, this is the first Riverside Green thread that I’ve seen descend to the low common denominator ignorance and bile typical of any internet forum or comment section, and it’s disappointing. Some true colors made a showing here. Sad.

        • AvatarPaulyG

          Ronnie, forget the logical counterpoints. There is no sense in your debating as the racial theories of the far left and the far right are both indistinguishable from religious dogma. For true believers, contradiction and illogic are features, not defects.

          Reply
      • Avataryossarian

        actually one of my closest friend’s grandfather was a gypsy. his entire family was wiped out in the countryside by people who hated gypsies and he was an orphan on the street at age five. he befriended a traveling geographer who adopted him and brought him to buenos aires where he lived a full life. his son, my friend’s father, is one of the greatest tango violinsts of all time. astor piazzolla wrote esqualo (the shark) to feature his talents:

        https://youtu.be/gAySBMgXP40

        true story

        Reply
          • AvatarJohn C.

            Yossarian points to really a fantastic musical tradition. Inspiring, spiritual, romantic, patriotic songs sung around a campfire at night by traveling gypsies to peasants for tips, food and drink after a long day working in the field. Many a country from Finland to Serbia then sent their best and brightest musical talents to formalize and professionalize what was being done on the fly by the gypsies.

            I was lucky enough to catch a gypsy band in Hungary last year and they were playing well everything from “Ava Maria” to “Something Stupid” by Sinatra.

  14. AvatarComfortablyNumb

    “This attitude, I believe, will very shortly come back to to haunt some, or all, of them.”

    Would you mind elaborating? Maybe I’m just not looking in the right places, but I have yet to see any real change come from something like this. Recessions, terrorist attacks, whatever. They send out a few all-employee emails, maybe record a cheesy video, but eventually things die down and the psychopaths just keep on psychopathing.

    Reply
  15. Avatarandyinsdca

    The “soft piano music” and the usual tripe about how we’re all in this “together” has been revived for the racism/BLM movement now. A&E just ran an ad that was effectively a dead copy of the typical Covid ad, just the wording & background pics were different, theme was the same.

    Reply

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