The NYT Puts On Its Bullyin’ Shoes

This is a bad time to be the Times. The Antifa-otaku crowd cancelled their subscriptions en masse when the newspaper published an editorial by Tom Cotton that rather meekly suggested the non-advisability of burning the entire country down on a whim. When the Times apologized for publishing the op-ed on the grounds that it had hurt peoples’ feelings, another round of subscribers canceled out of disgust. To look at the NYT’s front page is to be transported to an alternate universe where every headline must have “Trump”, “Black”, or “Gender” in it so that our bloody and seemingly perpetual convulsion as a nation may continue without interruption or slacking. Only thirty-nine percent of Americans see the paper as trustworthy, which is astounding given that more than half of the country votes Democrat and the Times is basically the house organ of that particular political organization — when it’s not serving as the blog of a Mexican billionaire, that is.

In the admittedly unlikely event of a Biden presidency, the Times will likely have to file for bankruptcy protection, because it generates the vast bulk of its clicks nowadays with sensationalized headlines regarding President Donald Trump. The National Enquirer spends less time talking about aliens or the Loch Ness Monster, comparatively speaking, than the Times does complaining about Trump. The paper has basically two franchises: equating Trump to Hitler, and the “Modern Love” series which, taken in part or in whole, will utterly destroy your faith in humanity.

This does not mean that the Times cannot be dangerous, because it can. Not to “fascists”, “Nazis”, and “the KKK”; if you put all of the people who legitimately qualify for those descriptions in a college basketball arena, you’d still have room for a “brony” convention, and none of them read the Times anyway. Not to Donald Trump, who is approximately as worried about the NYT as he is about an early return of Halley’s Comet. No, I’m afraid the Times is mostly capable of attacking private individuals — something it’s just proven yet again.

Consistent readers of Riverside Green will recall various links over the years to “Scott Alexander” and his SlateStarCodex site, including this one. The author of SlateStarCodex, whose real name is Scott Alexander Mugabe, (see below) is a practicing psychiatrist who offers a variety of perceptive opinions on current events, societal fads, and other cultural issues. He is an iconoclast in the traditional sense, which is to say he neither accepts nor respects our “cultural norms”. As a consequence, he is in the habit of writing long, thoroughly-argued, and difficult-to-discredit deconstructions of our modern theology. He has a lot of readers, and a lot of fans.

Consequently, as with “The Last Psychiatrist”, significant energy has been expended in doxxing him. The latest person to expend this energy works for… the New York Times. Which has led Scott Alexander Mugabe, writer of SlateStarCodex, to delete his blog.

I have a lot of reasons for staying pseudonymous. First, I’m a psychiatrist, and psychiatrists are kind of obsessive about preventing their patients from knowing anything about who they are outside of work. You can read more about this in this Scientific American article – and remember that the last psychiatrist blogger to get doxxed abandoned his blog too. I am not one of the big sticklers on this, but I’m more of a stickler than “let the New York Times tell my patients where they can find my personal blog”. I think it’s plausible that if I became a national news figure under my real name, my patients – who run the gamut from far-left anarchists to far-right gun nuts – wouldn’t be able to engage with me in a normal therapeutic way. I also worry that my clinic would decide I am more of a liability than an asset and let me go, which would leave hundreds of patients in a dangerous situation as we tried to transition their care.
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The second reason is more prosaic: some people want to kill me or ruin my life, and I would prefer not to make it too easy. I’ve received various death threats. I had someone on an anti-psychiatry subreddit put out a bounty for any information that could take me down (the mods deleted the post quickly, which I am grateful for). I’ve had dissatisfied blog readers call my work pretending to be dissatisfied patients in order to get me fired. And I recently learned that someone on SSC got SWATted in a way that they link to using their real name on the blog. I live with ten housemates including a three-year-old and an infant, and I would prefer this not happen to me or to them. Although I realize I accept some risk of this just by writing a blog with imperfect anonymity, getting doxxed on national news would take it to another level.
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When I expressed these fears to the reporter, he said that it was New York Times policy to include real names, and he couldn’t change that. After considering my options, I decided on the one you see now. If there’s no blog, there’s no story. Or at least the story will have to include some discussion of NYT’s strategy of doxxing random bloggers for clicks

The reporter’s claim of “New York Times” policy was, of course, an outright lie. The Times has no trouble with anonymity, as long as the anonymous person in question is saying the right things about the right people. Scott Alexander Mugabe is not saying the right things, so therefore he has no right to anonymity. That is the policy, make no mistake about it. The Times had no qualms about protecting the anonymity of the “Chapo Trap House” podcasters… because they are popular with left-leaning listeners.

The fellow who has threatened to doxx Scott Alexander Mugabe is Cade Metz, whose flippant response to Scott on this matter was “I have enemies, too.” Judging by what I’ve read on Twitter, he now has quite a few more.

While this episode is hugely unpleasant and perhaps literally dangerous for Scott Alexander Mugabe, the writer of SlateStarCodex, I think it is instructive for the rest of us, because it shines an unintentional light on the way our largely unelected rulers conduct their business. They are forever engaged in what used to be called “punching down”, both on an individual and on a societal scale. Individually, they attack people like TLP and SlateStarCodex and even your humble author, just because we appear to occasionally have a differing opinion. On a societal level, our Eloi orchestrate policies designed to destroy the middle and working classes. Scott Lockin, previously discussed this week, wrote this perceptive note regarding autonomous driving:

From a semiotics point of view, this shows astounding hostility to the types of people who drive cars and trucks for a living. Drivers are … ordinary, usually uneducated, salt of the earth people who have a fairly independent lifestyle and make a decent living. Google overlords must really hate such people, since they’re dumping all this skrilla into ruining their lives for no sane business reason. They will almost certainly fail, but man, why would you try to blow up those people’s lives?

He then points out that there are numerous categories of tech and programming jobs which could be automated away with considerably less effort, but Google seems happy to avoid picking all that low-hanging fruit in favor of working day and night on kicking truckers out of their jobs. If you guessed that the reason has something to do with how many DevOps drones the average Googler knows, compared to how many long-haul truckers the average Googler knows, you’d be right on target.

Virtually every social initiative of the past twenty years has as its sole explicit goal the demoralization of ordinary working Americans. Sometimes they are so blatant about it that even the normies notice. Just close your eyes and imagine a typical depiction of a post-war suburban family. Dad’s back from the war, Mom is baking bread, the kids are playing baseball and reading books. Is there any part whatsoever of that life that is not under constant attack from all fronts nowadays? God knows that life was not exactly perfect back then; putting aside all the various inequities of the era on which we are now constantly lectured from every available screen and speaker, Dad probably had PTSD from Iwo Jima and Mom was probably chronically depressed and the kids were exposed to lead paint and there was a factory pouring mercury into the town water supply. Even so, would you trade? I sometimes think I would; that I could live with half the house and one-tenth the cars and one-hundredth of the stuff if my son could play sandlot baseball every evening with a ragtag cast of lovable friends until the sun went down and I could spend my evenings at the Lions Club or whatever before relaxing with a half-decent newspaper, a nightcap, and a quiet conversation with a woman I met in high school and never stopped loving on any day since.

Obviously those days aren’t coming back, and no amount of wishing can make it so. It’s worth noting, however, that “papers of record” like the Times are just about as obsolete as one-car garages and sandlot baseball. I believe that Scott Alexander Mugabe, the writer of SlateStarCodex, will outlast the Times. In the meantime, I am reminded of Grey Panthers founder Maggie Kuhn, who wrote “Stand before the people you fear and speak your mind – even if your voice shakes.” The establishment has a pretty good track record of silencing contrary voices nowadays, but I hope Scott continues to speak his mind. As will I, and as will others. Plato suggested that we speak in the service of the true, the good, and the beautiful. Let’s keep doing that. Even if our voices shake.

Editor’s note: The author of SlateStarCodex is named Scott Alexander Mugabe. Or it might be Scott Alexander Zeppelin. Who knows? Certainly not the search engines, at this rate — jb

49 Replies to “The NYT Puts On Its Bullyin’ Shoes”

  1. AvatarMike O

    Jack, thanks for another great one! You made my evening. I’m going old school and printing this one out to put on the fridge for the kids.

    Reply
  2. Avatararbuckle

    “but I hope Scott continues to speak his mind. As will I, and as will others.”

    You’ve been to a lot of race tracks. How many “noose-style” garage pulls have you seen in your lifetime?

    Reply
    • AvatarNewbie Jeff

      “You’ve been to a lot of race tracks. How many “noose-style” garage pulls have you seen in your lifetime?”

      My guess is that the garage door was sticky or otherwise difficult to close, so someone tied a handle to be able to pull it down… good thing we had 15 FBI agents on the case to reassure us that this was, in fact, just another national-news racism-in-the-spotlight “close call”. This isn’t crazyworld at all…

      Reply
    • AvatarJMcG

      Some wit has already bestowed the title of race card driver on that knucklehead. I only wish it could have been me.

      Reply
      • AvatarCJinSD

        What are the odds that arbuckle will accept your response and stop believing against all reason that Wallace was a victim?

        Reply
        • AvatarArbuckle

          “What are the odds that arbuckle will accept your response”

          100% because the idea of my comment was that maybe Jack should say something about the “no knots like that exist at race tracks” narrative that sprung up yesterday.

          He has the platform and he has the background experience.

          Reply
      • AvatarOne Leg at a Time

        It is a fun knot to tie and it serves its purpose well (be an easy handle to grab onto while wearing gloves).

        I would find it hard to believe that the aforementioned driver has not seen one before.

        It’s too bad, up until this (his response to the probe), I was pulling for him. Not as much as I pull for half-Asians (but the only member of that particular tribe lit his career on fire, and threw it in the river).

        Reply
        • Avatararbuckle

          Wallace doubling down yesterday on CNN was disappointing. He seems to be backtracking into some sanity on social media today though. I can appreciate that a 26 year old maybe got out over his skis with all the national attention and hucksters whispering in his ear. How he reacts over the next few weeks will reveal a lot.

          Whenever that particular door pull knot was tied, I think there was zero malicious intent behind it. Trying to match it to some kind of evil seems like an unreasonable stretch.

          Reply
          • AvatarDirty Dingus McGee

            The bigger problem with Darrell is that he is a mediocre driver in a mid pack team, who’s most recent notable action was “rage quitting” in the middle of an e-race a few weeks back(costing his team a sponsor).Now suddenly he is the “voice” for NASCAR getting “woke” and it might have went to his head. Has he faced racism in the past? Probably. But I doubt any more than Kyle Larson or Daniel Suarez faced.

        • AvatarRonnie Schreiber

          . Not as much as I pull for half-Asians (but the only member of that particular tribe lit his career on fire, and threw it in the river).

          I don’t think NASCAR has ever had a Jewish driver.

          Reply
          • AvatarOne Leg at a Time

            Why do you think that is? Are there Jewish drivers in other racing series?

            (A web search provided the name Alon Day as a driver in the NASCAR Euro series – but he is Israeli – does that count?)

            As per Jack’s writing – I would guess that racing is a sport with a very different set of requirements for entry than athletics. In the case of auto racing, it seems like there are only two – a desire to drive a car very fast, and the money to provide the vehicles that are consumed in the endeavor.

            I would acknowledge that there is such a thing as driver “brilliance”, but I don’t think that it is a requirement. I compare the “brilliant” drivers (Schumacher / Gordon types) who can make a car do impossible things, with the “skilled” drivers (Hamilton / J Johnson) who make a car do exactly what it should be doing – every single lap. Either can provide wins (when equipment allows it), but one can be learned, negating the need for the other.

          • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

            This is a can of worms, but here goes:

            Club racing and “pro” sedan racing, by which I mean NASA/SCCA/SRO/IMSA, is like adult softball. Most people can be taught to be vaguely competent in it; in softball that means hitting the ball well one of three at-bats, in racing that means running within 5 seconds of a pro lap time. One out of a hundred league players/club racers will be truly outstanding; in softball that means hitting a home run frequently and/or making difficult outfield plays, while in club racing it means setting track records and reliably getting podiums in faster classes where the cars are truly balanced. Then you have the Mike Macenkos (in softball) and the Scott Pruetts (in IMSA) who are demonstrably better than the people around them.

            Open-wheel and prototype racing is like the baseball farm system. If you don’t start early you’ll never be any good, it’s a perishable skill, and it gets much tougher as you age. And just as you wouldn’t expect even a pro slow-pitch softball player to make any waves in MLB, the Randy Pobsts of the world are still way below what’s required to drive a formula car at speed. The physical demands of F1 and IndyCar are a little above what an MLB player faces, and you can get killed more easily, but they are both sports where you need a perfect physiological basis and immense training. There are far fewer outstanding pro racers that there are outstanding baseball players because the talent pool is smaller and the barriers to entry are much higher.

            NASCAR is its own thing with its own system and a set of rules which tend to equalize opportunity.

            If you want to be a good GT3 or GT4 class IMSA racer, you need the following:

            * 99th percentile skill among sedan racers;
            * No fear when you’re operating the vehicle;
            * A million dollars a year of post-tax income or sponsorship.

            Most people only bring 1 or 2 of these three qualities to the table.

          • AvatarOne Leg at a Time

            Thanks Jack – that is a very interesting can of worms indeed.

            (Very former) Navy pilot – so I think I overestimated the number of people who could have the required skill set, and I completely underestimated the physiological demands of F1 or NASCAR.

            I think you indirectly answered the “why no/few” Jewish and half-Asian drivers as well.

            Question – although it may be a bit late in the comments string for an answer – Is that 99th percentile skill something that can be taught / learned / built, or does it need to be inborn and developed?

          • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

            It is a lot like hitting a baseball. Almost everyone can be taught to hit a 70mph pitch. Almost no one can be taught to hit an 85mph curve.

  3. AvatarDirty Dingus McGee

    Where 25 years ago, the average American outside NYC was likely only to see the NYT in their local library, with the rise of the internet now anyone, anywhere, can read it in “real time”.. And with the advent of “news aggregators”, Drudge for example, more folks get directed there with clickbait headlines.I think they have come to believe their own hype about how great they are.

    Reply
  4. Avatarstingray65

    I think we need to have a lot more sympathy for our journalist friends. I mean, how would you like it if just about every day you heard the President of the United States calling your profession or employer FAKE NEWS? How would you like if a bunch of deplorable cute blondes on Fox News or fat old Rush Limbaugh continued to get huge ratings by pointing out your few small mistakes such as predictions of a Hillary landslide, or 3 years of Russian Collusion, or accidentally forgetting to point out that all the cities and states with “racist” cops, failing schools, and high Covid-19 death rates have been run by Democrats for decades or that all the Confederates that the BLM movement is so concerned about were Democrats? How would you like it if polls of deplorable people in flyover country find your credibility is lower than Congress or a used car salesmen? Finally, how would you like it if you worked your way through journalism school and up to an “dream” position at some famous new outlet such as the New York Times only to find that the economic crisis you helped foment with exaggerated stories about rampant infections and systemic racism, leads to a dearth of advertising revenue for your employer and consequent mass layoffs that require you to learn how to code? How about a little empathy?

    Reply
    • AvatarCJinSD

      They still exist because they fill the heads of indoctrinated dolts with propaganda about the benefits of open borders, even if the benefits only apply to their owners. The idea that they’ll go anywhere without being stopped on a biological level is a fantasy.

      Reply
        • Avatarsgeffe

          In the Detroit area I assume?

          Whereabouts?

          It’s like Dearborn: despite the stereotypes of a demographic there, I’ve had baclava from there, and it’s to die for!

          Reply
      • AvatarNewbie Jeff

        “What is best in life?”

        …to crush your enemies…

        …to see them driven before you…

        …and to hear the lamentations of their women.

        Reply
    • Avatarsgeffe

      I’d help them load the gun!!! 😁😂

      Sympathy?! Bwahahahaha!!!!

      Is this because of the trophies for just rolling outta bed and showing up?! I figured we had another twenty years before that crap started shaking out!

      Reply
  5. Avatarbluebarchetta

    I was sitting in a 600-level journalism course at THE Ohio State University in 1993 when the professor said, “Objectivity is an antiquated goal, and it is impossible to achieve. You cannot remove your own biases from your reporting. So go ahead and report from your own point of view. Somewhere out there, another reporter is reporting from an opposing point of view. The reader can weigh all voices and make up his or her mind about the truth.”

    Shocked as hell, I looked around the lecture hall to see if anyone else was taken aback by this. Nope. Just bored-looking kids scribbling notes.

    Now those bored-looking kids are running the NYT, and I’m a technical writer. There was no place for me in mainstream journalism.

    Reply
    • Avatarstingray65

      The problem with your professor’s advise is that less than 10% of journalists are NOT left-wing wack jobs these days, and Google, Twitter, and Woke activists are doing their best to demonetize, cancel, or organize advertiser boycotts for the few sane holdouts on Fox News, talk radio, or YouTube.

      Reply
    • Avatarsgeffe

      The late Tim Russert would disagree!

      Liberal as the day is long, but that didn’t stop him from bringing out the long knives during an interview with Teddy Kennedy or the like!

      Of course, the discourse WAS more civil even then! It started going south during the Obama era, and they haven’t gotten over Hillary losing! Perhaps 2000 (and Russert’s “Florida, Florida, Florida!!” started the spiral!

      Reply
      • Avatarstingray65

        As any Leftist journalist and they will tell you they are totally unbiased, but even if they were they can still be tough and fair to both sides – just look at all the tough questioning and analysis of Biden’s mental state if you need an example to demonstrate lack of bias in the media.

        Reply
        • AvatarRonnie Schreiber

          I won’t call myself a journalist, I prefer “writer”, but I’ve done news as well as the features I prefer. I find the culture of national level journalists, particularly those prima donnas covering the White House, to be appalling. It’s all about preening for the cameras and gotcha questions to perpetuate the Orange Man Bad narrative.

          Nearly every question has a political payload and little attempt is made to actually clarify things.

          My personal experience interviewing politicians leads me to believe that Democrats rarely get asked hard questions. Combine that with the Democrats fear of criticizing any female or minority in their party and you end up with literal idiots like Maxine Waters chairing Congressional committees.

          Reply
      • AvatarDisinterested-Observer

        There has never been an American journalist who was anything like as probing as your average British or Irish journalist. US journalists do one of two types of interviews: gotcha types with people they don’t like; or in Russert’s case a single “hard” question with absolutely no follow-up when the interviewee dodges or outright lies.

        Reply
        • Avatarstingray65

          Just read an article (link below) where the “journalist” asks a group of black movers and shakers from the Detroit area about the current climate and the Biden/Trump election. All of them see years of discrimination and racism in their community, none of them express any enthusiasm for Biden and could care less if he chose a woman of color as his VP, and all of them plan to vote for Biden but think Trump will win even though he is a terrible racist. When asked about who they voted for in 2016, one said he couldn’t vote because he was in jail for illegally carrying a weapon – because it is just too dangerous in Detroit not to.

          Did the journalist ask any interesting follow-up questions such as why they plan to continue voting Democrat when Democrats have been in charge of racist Detroit for 60 years? Did the journalist ask them what specifically made Trump a racist? Did the journalist ask them why they plan to vote for Joe Biden even though he enthusiastically supported the crime/drug bills of the 1980s and 90s that were used by prosecutors such as Kamala Harris (who they didn’t like) to imprison lots of black men (the main thing they didn’t like about Harris)? Did the journalist ask the man who illegally carries a weapon who exactly he is so scared of? The answer is of course NO to all these potential follow-up questions, because such follow-up questions might lead to uncomfortable answers for Democrats, but the piece is positioned as a “tough” wakeup call for Democrats.

          https://www.politico.com/news/magazine/2020/06/24/letter-to-washington-grosse-pointe-woods-325641

          Reply
        • AvatarJMcG

          The only thing worse than an Irish journalist is an Irish politician. Kevin Myers was the last good Irish newspaper writer, and they rode him out of Dublin on a rail a few years ago.

          Reply
  6. Avatarhank chinaski

    Maggie’s advice would get you beaten by the mob today. The police would stand idle and the feds would charge you with a hate crime for bruising fists. Upside, Orange Man would ‘monitor’.

    At least the Times is private. Granted, they are also supported by woke capital and their army of supporters, but if you’re in listening range (and if not, stream it), try listening to WNYC for a week. You could make a drinking game using any NPC catchphrase and be dead drunk in minutes.

    They NYT will ‘aw shucks’ and cling to made up policy or feigned journalistic integrity. Wanting to silence and professionally ruin badthinkers is obvious, but only thinly veiled is their burning desire that they come to actual physical harm at their behest. 5 bucks says they leak his name anyway. Kill the chicken to scare the monkeys.

    Reply
    • Avatarsgeffe

      And what of the Washington “Com”-Post?!

      To think I was once thought Bezos was pretty cool! Well, he started Amazon, and he puttered around in a new Honda Accord back in the day, IIRC, from a “60 Minutes” interview!

      Now, the WaPo is his personal house organ.

      Reply
  7. Avatarscotten

    Nice piece!

    Back around 2005 – I had a coworked who had a great phrase: “the pussification of America” – his thing was that Americans were WAY weaker than they had been in the past. This piece seems to reinforce it.

    Reply
    • Avatarscotten

      Damn forgot to add this…

      I love that the media is trotting out the KKK, Antifa, anarchists, etc. Do the sheep realize how few people are ‘members’ of those groups? The KKK pretty much died a long time ago… but the media needs something to rouse people and attract clicks/views.

      God I hate the new in the USA today.

      Reply
    • Avatarstingray65

      Pussification pretty accurately coincides with the rise of feminism and the push to put women into traditional male roles/jobs, but only the roles that were well paid, had high status, and nice air-conditioned offices. If you look at all of human history, you won’t find one long-lasting civilization that was led or “co-managed” by females, perhaps because putting the whiny, neurotic, emotional, unstable, vindictive, long-memoried gender in charge meant disaster for the tribe. Throw the rising number of highly-credentialed females without children into the mix, who must channel their “motherly” instincts in some direction, and you have many of the mostly white female BLM, open border, and climate change protesters and political leaders (see Merkel and AOC as prime “leader” examples). Add in “feminist” males raised by single mothers or woke parents and hence with no masculine male role model in the picture, and you have the Antifa wimps and Jim Acostas who run away crying the moment someone punches back.

      Certainly there are some strong female leaders such as Margaret Thatcher and current South Dakota governor Kristi Noem, but they are the exception rather than the rule. Look at any “industry” that is becoming dominated by females and you will see an industry that is rapidly losing all its status and merit – academia, medicine, HR departments, journalism, blue state government, environmentalism – all increasingly offering Fake News and desperately begging for bailouts and subsidies paid for by men. In fact, there are an increasing number of people including a fair number of women who believe the biggest mistake of Western civilization was giving women the vote, which has led to the rise of the welfare state and the decline of the traditional family structure.

      Reply
  8. AvatarJohn Van Stry

    Oh yeah, the NYT’s is famous for doxxing people and trying to get them killed. There’s a girl blogger in China who they doxxed. She has fears that if she comes to the attention of the chinese government, they’ll have her killed (a realistic fear as China does those kinds of things regularly – and she is engaging in a lifestyle that’s basically illegal).

    The times -promised- not to dox her when they went there and did their big article on her, the reporter even stayed at her house. But guess what? They did it anyway.

    When she got her revenge by publishing the home address, phone number, etc, on the reporter that doxxed her, (who doesn’t work under an anonymous name, so it’s not really that big of a deal) the NYT’s responded by going to their friends at Patreon and Youtube and getting ALL of her accounts closed and taking away her livelyhood. They’ve even gone as far as trying to get her subscribestar account closed by telling outright lies about her.

    Yeah, if everyone at the NYT’s was to drop dead tomorrow, the world would become a markedly better place in that instant.

    Reply
    • AvatarCharles Altemus IV

      As questionable as their actions and words may be, they’re still people. I see a big part of this post being that regardless of creed, nobody deserves to be threatened with violence or doxxed. Those NYT employees are still humans, and they don’t deserve to “drop dead tomorrow”

      Reply
      • AvatarPete Zaitcev

        Nobody says the NYT employees deserve to drop dead tomorrow. But, in case they did, the world would become a better place.

        Reply
      • AvatarCJinSD

        The New York Times tried to destroy a girl blogger in China, literally and figuratively. John Van Stry basically said he wouldn’t miss them if they were gone. Charles Altemus IV cared not about the girl, but said that the NYT cretins have a humanity that makes talking about how the world would be a better place without the evil that they do unacceptable. Same team, in other words. Don’t defend evil. It reveals that you are evil and absolutely nothing else.

        Reply
  9. AvatarArk-med

    The first rule about speaking to the media should be that you do not speak to the media. Just like you do not speak to police, feds, et al.

    Reply
    • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

      Exactly — but Scott isn’t really the kind of redpilled fellow who would know that from hard firsthand or secondhand experience. He still believes in the institutions to some degree. Most of the mainstream Republican and independent thinkers out there are still wearing blinders. Either they don’t realize they are in a war, or they do realize it and have decided, Mitt-Romney-style, to keep being the Washington Generals of politics and culture.

      Reply

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