Weekly Roundup: Passover Edition

I don’t celebrate Christmas and my own birthday is more of a sorrowful occasional than a cheerful one but you can bet I will turn out for National Filet Day, which is easily the most legitimate holiday in post-collapse America. There’s a new Ruth’s Chris here in Columbus. It’s not nearly as good as the old one for several reasons, one of them being its relocation from a quiet and anonymous suburban mall outlot to a cramped corner facing the downtown convention center. This means I can either let the valets play Ferris Bueller’s Day Off with my car or I can park it somewhere on the street and cross my fingers. That’s what I did yesterday. On the way to the restaurant, I passed this mini-mural. What does it mean?

Downtown Columbus got pretty well trashed during the peaceful protests several weeks ago. A number of the businesses were Black-owned, but there’s been a distinct lack of thoughtfulness in these protests. This building had been a Japanese steakhouse for a while before closing and being offered for lease. It’s owned by “473-479 N HIGH LLC”, which does not care to disclose its ownership and which appears to always be represented solely by counsel in various government actions concerning the property. At some point the property got its windows knocked out and got boarded up.

There are two spray-painted messages on the plywood: a while “BLM” with a heart, and “I Love You, Black Man”, again with a heart. How’d they get there? Did the same person do both, perhaps a few days apart? Was the first one a casual tagging, and the second one a response from the mysterious owner? If so, what’s the purpose of that? Heartfelt support? A change of heart regarding a previously-held position? Why “Black Man”? Riding around downtown and the OSU campus, my son and I have seen a lot of these hasty testaments to Black power on expensive homes and commercial real estate. There’s no real debate going on here: nobody is putting up any signs even suggesting the hated and proscribed-by-decree “all lives matter”, or the horrifying, FBI-investigated “it’s OK to be white”. As previously noted in these pages, this is a protest with no apparent opposition. Yet it continues.

Anyway, let’s assume this is a heartfelt message from a mysterious group of property owners. In the meantime, let’s go through a passage from an old book:

And the Lord spake unto Moses and Aaron in the land of Egypt saying, This month shall be unto you the beginning of months: it shall be the first month of the year to you. Speak ye unto all the congregation of Israel, saying, In the tenth day of this month they shall take to them every man a lamb, according to the house of their fathers, a lamb for an house: And if the household be too little for the lamb, let him and his neighbour next unto his house take it according to the number of the souls; every man according to his eating shall make your count for the lamb. Your lamb shall be without blemish, a male of the first year: ye shall take it out from the sheep, or from the goats: And ye shall keep it up until the fourteenth day of the same month: and the whole assembly of the congregation of Israel shall kill it in the evening.
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And they shall take of the blood, and strike it on the two side posts and on the upper door post of the houses, wherein they shall eat it. And they shall eat the flesh in that night, roast with fire, and unleavened bread; and with bitter herbs they shall eat it. Eat not of it raw, nor sodden at all with water, but roast with fire; his head with his legs, and with the purtenance thereof. And ye shall let nothing of it remain until the morning; and that which remaineth of it until the morning ye shall burn with fire. And thus shall ye eat it; with your loins girded, your shoes on your feet, and your staff in your hand; and ye shall eat it in haste: it is the Lord’s passover. For I will pass through the land of Egypt this night, and will smite all the firstborn in the land of Egypt, both man and beast; and against all the gods of Egypt I will execute judgment: I am the Lord. And the blood shall be to you for a token upon the houses where ye are: and when I see the blood, I will pass over you, and the plague shall not be upon you to destroy you, when I smite the land of Egypt.
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And this day shall be unto you for a memorial; and ye shall keep it a feast to the Lord throughout your generations; ye shall keep it a feast by an ordinance for ever. Seven days shall ye eat unleavened bread; even the first day ye shall put away leaven out of your houses: for whosoever eateth leavened bread from the first day until the seventh day, that soul shall be cut off from Israel. And in the first day there shall be an holy convocation, and in the seventh day there shall be an holy convocation to you; no manner of work shall be done in them, save that which every man must eat, that only may be done of you. And ye shall observe the feast of unleavened bread; for in this selfsame day have I brought your armies out of the land of Egypt: therefore shall ye observe this day in your generations by an ordinance for ever.
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In the first month, on the fourteenth day of the month at even, ye shall eat unleavened bread, until the one and twentieth day of the month at even. Seven days shall there be no leaven found in your houses: for whosoever eateth that which is leavened, even that soul shall be cut off from the congregation of Israel, whether he be a stranger, or born in the land. Ye shall eat nothing leavened; in all your habitations shall ye eat unleavened bread. Then Moses called for all the elders of Israel, and said unto them, Draw out and take you a lamb according to your families, and kill the passover. And ye shall take a bunch of hyssop, and dip it in the blood that is in the bason, and strike the lintel and the two side posts with the blood that is in the bason; and none of you shall go out at the door of his house until the morning. For the Lord will pass through to smite the Egyptians; and when he seeth the blood upon the lintel, and on the two side posts, the Lord will pass over the door, and will not suffer the destroyer to come in unto your houses to smite you.

There you go.

* * *

This week, at Hagerty, we ran my long magazine piece on the cars of 1994. I reviewed the new 2021 Tahoe. My son and I continued our two-week trip. Our What If? series considered the idea of a 4WD hachi-roku.

39 Replies to “Weekly Roundup: Passover Edition”

  1. AvatarCreamed Tomatoes

    The positioning of a lamb’s blood on the door frame gives a picture of the cross yet to come but your point is taken.

    Thanks for using the KJV.

    Reply
    • AvatarCreamed Tomatoes

      While we’re on Biblical matters it occurred to me earlier today at Sam’s Club after my wife was sternly warned to pull her mask up over her nose that Revelation 13:17 is becoming easier to understand.

      We would have left out of annoyance but I’m nearly out of 500ml bottles of Perrier. One must make allowances.

      Reply
    • AvatarRonnie Schreiber

      Well, except for the inconvenient fact that a lintel is U-shaped, not T shaped.

      If you draw the targets after the arrows have flown, every shot can be a bull’s-eye.

      Reply
  2. AvatarJohn C.

    I really enjoyed the class of 94 article. Showing how good 80s design had gotten in it’s final refinement. It was the last time countries were designing cars for their own nation’s buyers and as such cars all had a real individual flavor. Even the RX7 had finally attracted a domestic Japan fanbase and the car benefited greatly for catering to it. It was good looking, but I was disappointed to read it hadn’t lost the handling skittishness my 87 had.

    Reply
  3. AvatarLynnG

    Great review of the 2021 Tahoe. However $80,000 for a Tahoe is like you said Escalade money, but some people just do not want to be seen at Costco in an Escalade.

    The question is, now that the General is offering the big block in the top of the line Tahoe. I wonder if Chevrolet will again offer the 3/4 ton Surburban to the general public? The current generation Surburban (2015-2020) you can only get the 3/4 ton model with the big block if you have a government customer ID number (never leave home without it).

    Reply
    • Avatarscotten

      As a lifetime cheapskate, the idea of an $80k truck leaves me horrified. Who can afford such a beast? Using a 35% pre-tax annual income calculation implies that the average buyers’ households make ~ $240K per year. Wow.

      Reply
    • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

      GM is very worried about the optics of selling HD Suburbans to the public. They saw what the media did to Ford with the Excursion… not that it hurt Excursion sales.

      Reply
    • AvatarJohn C.

      Is there some advantage other than towing in having the 3/4 ton Suburban? Surely it would lose the irs feature, which admittedly is probably overrated in a truck like this. The beefing up though would mostly negate any torque advantage in what passes today for a big block. I guess it would sit taller which perhaps a few might like, not the prep school moms of course.

      Reply
      • AvatarLynnG

        Or John, like my wife’s employer. They have eleven children (ages 4-22) and when they go on vacation they take their two 2014 3/4 Surburban’s towing two Airsteam trailers….. (Note: They have never taken the children to Disney World, cost prohibitive). For the last 15 years they have been to almost every national park. The 3/4 ton Surburbans like Jack said below are very durable… and can double as the the family station wagon, yet a little overkill until you need the towing capasity….

        Reply
        • AvatarJohn C.

          Lynn you have warmed my heart with talk of your wife’s employer’s large family. In the absence or T&C, Country Squire, Colony Park, or Custom Cruiser wagons, I whole heartedly endorse 3/4 ton Suburbans for this noble duty. I am touched that it still exists, even if only with government code fakery.

          Reply
  4. Avatararbuckle

    There are a decent number of home made “all lives matter” signs and first responder flags in my area.
    I haven’t ventured into the nearest urban area in the last several months so not sure how it is looking.

    Reply
  5. AvatarNewbie Jeff

    “Downtown Columbus got pretty well trashed during the peaceful protests several weeks ago”

    Re: my comment on last week’s post… see, isn’t that fun?

    My company is attaching warning notifications to any aircrew with Seattle layovers. They’re watching the developments surrounding city council votes and warning all employees to stay away from areas of peaceful protests.

    Reply
  6. AvatarTomko

    Jack: the picture of you driving the Tahoe shows the rearview mirror in reflective mode. Do you prefer that to the rear camera mirror setting?

    Reply
  7. Avatarstingray65

    Are 90+% of the “peaceful” protesters in Columbus young white adults (i.e. scrawny pale males and fat tattooed females) heavily in debt from their grievance study degrees and living in their mommy’s basement as they are in Portland and Minneapolis? I wonder whether blacks or whites will be most disappointed when the jury fails to convict cops who watched George Floyd die from a drug overdose while waiting for an ambulance?

    Reply
  8. AvatarNoID

    Re: driving on sand, the best thing you could have done is air down your tires if you had found yourself well and truly stuck. You had a hand pump in there for the bike tires, right? So you air down, drive out, then spend one hour per tire airing back up by hand. Easy peasy!

    Follow me on *checks notes* Tick Tock and InstaGraham for more advice!

    Reply
    • AvatarNoID

      Also, your list is missing the 1994 Buick Roadmaster Estate. Toss the Jag off this list and replace it with the true Master.

      Reply
    • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

      Not a bad idea at all and one I will keep in mind for the next time I go in sand, which will be… never!

      Reply
      • Avatar-Nate

        Yeah right Jack ~

        As soon as John says “Dad, I want to ride in the sand” you’ll be out there…..

        Luckily for me my son took up dune buggies and dirt bikes (eans sand in California) after he’s grown and gone .

        I hate the sand too .

        Except of course for hard pack roads, Death Valley and other foolish places I like to go sweat like a whore in church .

        -Nate

        Reply
          • Avatar-Nate

            I hate sand 24/7 but oddly enough I keep going back to the Desert, mostly the Mojave and Death Valley, every time I get dehydrated and hot and wonder why the hell I keep doing it but I do……

            I don’t ride my Motocycles in the soft sand, dunes and so on .

            -Nate

  9. Avatar-Nate

    John’s going to remember these trips for the rest of his life .

    I asked my son about this recently, he’s in his 40’s now and he said they were fun as well as informative and he remembers them fondly .

    I, OTOH, worry about how I should have done things better…

    -Nate
    (who’s also good friends with a recliner)

    Reply
  10. AvatarJDW

    Seeing the KJV passage brings to mind my favorite bumper sticker:

    “If It Ain’t King James, It Ain’t Bible”

    Reply
    • AvatarRonnie Schreiber

      The KJV is a great work of literature but there are translations of the Hebrew bible that are more faithful to the original. I’m personally partial to the multi-volume Judaica Press editions (https://www.judaicapress.com/collections/torah-study).
      For an academic Christian translation, I’d suggest the Anchor Bible series, edited by the late David Noel Freedman, who was my advisor at Michigan.

      Reply
      • Avatarbenjohnson

        I heartily agree about the Anchor Bible translations – especially because each book describes how the difficult process was addressed.

        The Hebrew-English Mikraot Gedolot is a good purchase in my opinion. On the Christian side, the Augsburg Press Study Bible finally shows that not all American Bible scholars are not idiots – though Jewish readers may rebel in seeing the Son in so much of the Tanakh.

        For myself – I appreciate the 1611 KJV for memorization and for the Apocrypha/Deuterocanonicals . 500 years of stability is a good start.

        Reply
  11. Avatargtem

    $65k for the base Tahoe, holy hell man. I’ve driven the K2XX Tahoes a number of times as rentals and was left with a generally positive impression. The 5.3L makes plenty of power for me, and got me an indicated 24mpg in highway driving to and from Chicago. I even considered a lightly used “Custom” trim priced somewhere in the lower-mid 30s in my recent truck shopping foray. But I ended up paying sales tax money for my high mile ’06 Suburban. There are several newer Tahoes/Yukons in our new neighborhood, your wife’s observation is astute, none of them are the extended length Subrubans/XLs. IMO the Suburban is a no-brainer for truly swiss army type utility. I was hauling a trunk full of tools and a rental tile saw in mine, with my son secured safely in his rear facing seat in the second row. It’s fantastic. I even get 17mpg with my AFM-less ’06 in mixed driving.

    Reply
  12. AvatarDan S

    Jack,
    On the Tahoe review, besides the fact that nobody cross shops them in practice. Why no comparison to the Land Rover Discovery?

    Similar size, similar price, big differences in capability (and reliability).

    Reply
    • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

      As the former owner of four different Land Rovers between 1997 and 2004, I just can’t take them seriously. Selling the brand to India didn’t help in that regard.

      The Discovery is really a Traverse competitor, being a V6 unibody vehicle with limited second-row space. I would be flat-out amazed if someone got 150,000 miles out of one without a five-figure repair; 150k with no four-figure repairs is the minimum expectation for Tahoes. No doubt the Disco would smoke it off-road but that’s like saying that a Cayenne Turbo GTS GT3 Burgerkingring edition would smoke it around a racetrack.

      Reply
      • AvatarDan S

        As the owner of a D3, and knowing some people who own D2s, I agree that you’re unlikely to get to 150k with no huge repair bills. Although the D2 or BMW engined range rovers were probably the absolute nadir for reliability on that brand. If large SUV buyers were looking for low ownership cost, wouldn’t they all be driving Sequoias and GX460s? Both of which will likely hit the 300k mark with no four figure repairs.

        That said, to be fair to the new Disco, the V6 does have a supercharger and 8 cylinders. Just no pistons in two of them.

        Rather than display my inner aspie by making any further comparisons, or some of the nearly British quality issues I saw in the ~10k miles I put on a K2 Yukon Denali… Maybe it’s worth asking if you have any worthwhile stories from when you owned your discos? You’ve written quite a bit about your Phaeton’s in the past, but very little on the discos. Even if it’s just tales of the 3 amigos and blown head gaskets.

        Reply
        • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

          There’s not that much to tell. I didn’t keep any of them out of warranty. The ’97 stick shift I started with spent maybe 30 days total in the shop. The D2 4.6 I had was the most reliable of them. My business partner was foolish enough to run both colors of 4.6 Vitesse at once (red and yellow) and he rarely had them both in his possession.

          My experience with Amazons and Prados sis second hand but it suggests they are not immune to big repair bills.

          Reply
          • AvatarDan S

            Interesting. Thanks for the background. Your business partner’s experience sounds like about what I’d expect from a D2.

            The only major issue I’d seen pop up on GX460s when looking at buying one was secondary air pump, although I’m sure there are others. Regardless, none of them are panther-like in their reliability, GM full sizers included.

            Also, related to the earlier discussion on 3/4 ton SUVs. More than optics, the other likely reason nobody makes them is the little known regulations that dub them “medium duty passenger vehicles” for fuel economy purposes. They get lumped in with light duty vehicles, and have correspondingly difficult fuel economy targets.

          • Avatarjc

            I don’t know about the Prada but the Volvo Amazon is – I think – generally regarded as an extremely reliable car for its time.

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