Weekly Roundup: It’s Child Porn, But It’s Worse Than That Edition

Question for the audience: How many of you can remember any salient plot points of the film Porky’s other than the infamous shower scene? I have to confess that I could not, in much the same way that Fast Times At Ridgemont High exists in my memory as “Jennifer Jason Leigh lying down and Phoebe Cates standing up”. Those movies were fairly simple devices: at a time when female nudity was fairly difficult to come by for teenaged boys, they provided a generous amount of it, wrapped in enough comedy to make the consumption of the film respectable. My high school classmates would have had a very low opinion of anyone who went to a peep show or an adult movie booth, but Porky’s was just on this side of being, as the kids say now, “normalized”. You could go see the movie with friends and not feel like you’d just watched a porno together.

Judging from both the critical and public reception to the African-French child-sex film Cuties, available on Netflix right next to all the new documentaries from groundbreaking producers Barack and Michelle Obama, one might think that it’s “Porky’s for perverts” or something like that: a heartwarming, thoughtful dramedy that just happens to feature extended scenes of children mimicking sexual acts, behaving provocatively, and actively soliciting sexual attention from 18-year-olds. All the usual suspects — the New Yorker, the Washington Post — just adore the movie, and recommend that everyone should see it as soon as possible. Anybody who objects to the sexual portrayal of eleven-year-olds is just a stick-in-the-mud fuddy-duddy, essentially identical to the old ladies who didn’t want Porky’s shown at your Main Street USA duplex. The rather hilarious phrase “Stream the child porn, bigot!” has appeared all over Twitter this week as a pithy encapsulation of this viewpoint.

Were Cuties nothing but a glossy wrapper for kiddie pornography, it would be utterly repugnant and unworthy of distribution anywhere in the world — but, as we will see in a moment, it is much worse than that.

God bless Tulsi, who in a sane world would have accepted the Democratic nomination for President three months ago and who would currently be preparing for a vigorous series of debates with Donald Trump — but I digress. Let’s take a moment to review the plot of Cuties. Note that I have not watched anything besides the preview for the film; the mere possibility of child porn is enough to make me physically ill. Therefore, I’ve relied on five reviews from mainstream media sources, all of which were favorable towards it.

Cuties is the story of “Amy”, an eleven-year-old African girl living in Paris. This is fairly normal, and more so every year; although the French government prohibits any gathering of statistics which might indicate the racial origin of its residents, almost sixty percent of the children born in France during 2018 were noted as being susceptible to sickle-cell anemia, a disease which does not affect ethnic French. There’s some nontrivial irony here. France was one of the last European countries to relax its grip on an African colony; now it has been effectively colonized by its former holdings. There are more Algerians in France now than there ever were Frenchmen in Algiers. As French defeats go, it’s not as dramatic or cinematic as the longbow-fueled ass-kicking by Henry V at Agincourt or Heinz Guderian’s Mercedes-Benz-powered end-run around the Maginot Line, but it has the advantage of being utterly permanent and irreversible.

Amy’s family, like the vast majority of French immigrants, practices Islam faithfully and precisely. Her father is gone overseas on a mission; the nature of this mission is initially kept from Amy, but she eventually learns that it is for marriage to a second wife. Amy’s mother is not thrilled about this, but the other women in her Islamic neighborhood have little sympathy for her concerns. A few members of Amy’s family note that they were engaged to be married when they were eleven, and that Amy should expect to be matched up with someone in the near future. This is frightening to Amy, who then experiences her first period. (This is statistically normal for African girls, albeit not for European or Hispanic ones.)

It is easy to imagine a film like this being made fifty years ago, with much the same beginning but a very different middle and ending. Having established Islam and its treatment of women as Very, Very Bad, our eleven-year-old heroine would have been exposed to a Christian church (in an American film) or secular French culture (in a European one). Either of these influences would have essentially separated her from her family, but she would also have been separated from the probability of being married off at twelve. You take the good with the bad, as they say.

In The Current Year, things are different. Amy meets a group of eleven-year-old girls who perform hip-hop dance moves for an upcoming competition. I’ll let the New Yorker tell you what happens next:

As a sort of virtual hazing at school, the Cuties push Amy into the boys’ bathroom to video-record a boy’s genitals. Her membership in the group involves her self-aware misconduct, transgressions that she undertakes quickly and coldly: stealing a cell phone from a cousin, stealing money from her mother, fighting with another girl, making herself an object of social-media scandal, even several acts of potentially grave violence. For Amy, belonging to the Cuties means more than a new activity or a new set of friends—it means forging for herself a new, self-chosen identity, which she clings to desperately, at great risk and great cost.

Her mother slaps her when she finds out about this criminal behavior; Cuties treats this like the “No more wire hangers!” scene in Mommie Dearest. Eventually Amy is accepted into the “Cuties”. What happens after that? None of the reviews bothers to tell us, but who gives a shit? I’m sure they win the dance contest and get to appear on French TV or something like that. The point of the movie is that Amy leaves Islam and joins pop culture.

If this sounds familiar, it’s because it is the plot of everything from Save The Last Dance to Avatar to the first Fast And Furious movie: protagonist renounces Cultural Group A and becomes an enthusiastic part of Cultural Group B. What makes Cuties especially repugnant is that it changes the plot in one critical respect. In all of the above films, Cultural Group B is

better
more soulful
more in touch with nature
kinder
less judgmental
and so on

compared to Cultural Group A. In Cuties, Cultural Group B is

more fun

…and that’s it. We are given to understand that Amy is horrified at the idea of having sex with an older man as part of Islam — but then she joins a group of girls who, in the trailer to the film, represent themselves as being 14 years old so they can initiate sex with older teenagers. What’s the difference here? Very little — except that in Cultural Group A, sex with older men is disgusting and ugly while in Cultural Group B it’s going to be totally fun and cool.

In Cultural Group A, Amy’s family and their neighbors work hard, save money, take care of each other, and observe a strict code of public behavior. In Cultural Group B, Amy’s new friends perform “transgressive” activities like theft and assault. This is better, because it’s fun. Note that not even the first Fast And Furious movie makes this kind of case for Toretto’s “crew”. To the contrary, Toretto and his friends are absolutely unwilling to kill anyone, while their enemies (the police, Johnny Tran, the truckers) are eager to kill them. It’s contrived and saccharine, but it also firmly establishes the movie as inherently moral.

It’s no wonder American audiences are bewildered by Cuties. Not only is it disgusting to watch, it’s also an explicitly political film for a completely different audience. The purpose is to argue the supremacy of the Global Uniparty Cult over Islam. The Global Uniparty Cult is amoral, violent, pornographic, exploitive, unrewarding, and horrifyingly impersonal — but it’s a lot more fun than Islam, am I right? The world of Cuties is literally the whole Alastair Crowley “Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the law” viewpoint where being slapped for theft is a worse crime than theft by a long shot.

The alert reader will note that child sex is an essential part of both ideologies in the film. This is the most horrifying part of Cuties: it reminds us that children have been used for sexual purposes since the dawn of time, and that apparently we are headed back to that practice as fast as we can manage it. This is, to put it mildly, bad news. Fifty years ago, it looked like the combination of Christian faith and humanist thought had put a permanent stop to this exploitation, at least in Europe and North America, but it’s now apparent that this no-kid-fucking-allowed period was basically the flight of the Venerable Bede’s sparrow through a brief moment in history.

The Global Uniparty has no problem with using children for sex. California Senator Scott Weiner has been in the news lately for proposing what was called a “pro-pedo” bill — but The Advocate hastens to assure us that it is primarily intended to protect 24-year-olds who have anal sex with 14-year-olds, which is of course totally not pedophilia because, uh, actually I have no idea why it’s not pedophilia, but Reuters wants me to know that “the bill is intended to reform the state’s sex offender registry to be fairer to young LGBT adults who may be in technical violation of statutory rape laws.” So if you come home from work to find a 23-year-old on top of your 14-year-old, have no fear — it’s just a “technical violation”. A technical foul, get it? Like hanging on the rim after a dunk in college basketball.

When all is said and done, Cuties is simply a statement of political power: we are coming for your kids, and we have all the tools we need to do it. Doesn’t matter if you’re Muslim, Christian, Buddhist, or a follower of the LOL-IRONY flying spaghetti monster. The deck is stacked and you’re going to lose. It’s also a fascinating view into the Uniparty mindset of what constitutes “diversity”. The “Cuties” are ethnically diverse — they look different — but they all believe exactly the same thing. It’s a nice counterpart to, say, “Twelve Angry Men”, where you had this tremendous difference of opinion and belief among a jury of fellows who were all from about the same background. That was diversity of thought, which is no longer welcome. And you might think that you’re free to have diversity of thought right about something like child pornography, but you’ll eventually be disabused of that notion. In other words:

* * *

For Hagerty, I considered the leatherette singularity.

63 Replies to “Weekly Roundup: It’s Child Porn, But It’s Worse Than That Edition”

  1. Avatararbuckle

    “children have been used for sexual purposes since the dawn of time, and that apparently we are headed back to that practice as fast as we can manage it.”

    In our lifetimes CP and sexual contact with minors ages 10-17 is going to be “decriminalized” to the point it is equivalent to running a stop sign. In your children’s lifetimes it will become a celebrated lifestyle. And “Hate speech” will be prosecuted to point you can go to prison for it.

    “The deck is stacked and you’re going to lose.”

    Bingo. You could end most of your posts with this line.

    Reply
  2. Avatarstingray65

    Sounds like the child porn Muslim version of Footloose; Teens in an uptight evangelical Christian community that prohibits dancing and rock music (culture A), who break free to dance to the catchy title song at the high school prom (culture B). Of course to object to such child exploitation in the Cutie movie puts you on the wrong side of history – gay rights leads to > gay marriage > leads to transgender rights > leads to legal bigamy > leads to pedophilia (as long as its consensual and reasonable – honest officer, I didn’t know he was only 4 – I swear he said he was 7 and he came on to me) > leads to sex with animals (what can I say, he was hung like a horse). In any case, Muslim culture seem to be leading the way with bigamy and child molestation, so it seems strange that the movie regards Muslim culture as backwards instead of progressive. Since I have not heard about any Muslim “peaceful” protests regarding their portrayal in the film, I guess they are ok with it, which must mean there is no cartoon depiction of Muhammad featured in the film. The fact that Tulsi Gabbard objects to the movie only goes to show that she is far too sane, patriotic, and Islamophobic to be the Democrat presidential candidate in 2020.

    Reply
    • Avatarhank chinaski

      The filmmakers might have tackled genital mutilation or bacha bazi, but that might have haramed their cause.

      Might I suggest two alternative, but also French takes on Islamic replacement: ‘Submission’ and ‘Camp of the Saints’.

      Reply
  3. AvatarNoID

    As far as I can tell the failure of Netflix is entirely through de-contextualizing the marketing for this documentary. I have yet to watch it, but I’ve dug into the history of the filmmaker and what drove her to make this film, and it all began with her witnessing a dance troupe performing in this manner and she was HORRIFIED by what she saw. Her desire in making this was to criticize the hypersexualization of young girls. not glorify it or normalize it.

    I’ll reserve final judgment for if/when I view it myself. But I think what we’re seeing from the media is they are stuck in a kind of intellectual “fight, flight, or freeze” moment with this documentary. They can’t criticize Culture A because DIVERSITY, they can’t criticize Culture B because FEMALE EMPOWERMENT, so what they are lift with is making up some ridiculous red herring or simply freezing and writing a value-neutral analysis where this is some dirty, but normal and acceptable in today’s world, coming-of-age story / cultural collision, and gee whiz, isn’t this all interesting? But to come out and condemn the behavior, which ironically would be to agree with the very filmmaker who made it? That’s a bridge too far. Let’s just appreciate the bravery of the director and the bravery of the girl and the bravery of the mother and gosh isn’t everyone just so brave!

    But what is the current catchphrase again?

    Silence is violence.

    Reply
    • AvatarNewbie Jeff

      “Her desire in making this was to criticize the hypersexualization of young girls. not glorify it or normalize it”

      The first thing that occurred to me reading Jack’s article was the movie “Kids”, made in the 90’s and starring a young Chloe Sevigny. The story is a bunch of kids running around NYC wild and unsupervised, doing drugs, having sex, and going to parties… but the point was to show that such an aimless, immoral youth was ultimately destructive: all of the main characters end up with HIV from having sex with each other and it’s assumed they will die of AIDS. I think there’s a fine line between glorifying reckless youth behavior and making it a cautionary tale… but at least in “Kids”, it was clear which side of the line the movie was on…

      Reply
      • AvatarGene B

        Ideas introduced by the film media to affect their agenda for societal change are much easier introduced in the negative, and this film is no exception. People will see it, contemplate it, and think – I can do this – it will work out well for ME. And all of a sudden years pass and it has become the norm. Look at the ideas introduced through movies…adultery…cheating…abortion…drugs…homosexuality…first introduced in the negative before they were accepted in the positive. We are frogs in hot water, waiting for the temperature to rise.

        Reply
    • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

      I have no trouble believing that the filmmaker was horrified, or at least nonplussed, by the early sexualization of children — but that’s like saying that the people who made The Fast And The Furious probably weren’t big fans of illegal street racing.

      Reply
    • AvatarCJinSD

      Maïmouna Doucouré spent many hours having 650 eleven years old girls twerk for her during casting. She must have been repulsed.

      Reply
    • Avatarsilentsod

      She was horrified and then she creates a film which portrays the sexualization in a glamorous manner with the way the camera moves and lingers? With the girls themselves being excited about what they’re doing?

      That’s not portraying something as horrific, and that could even be done without filming a softcore child porn.

      Reply
      • AvatarNoID

        Yeah I stand corrected. I thought this was a documentary or docudrama, when it is in fact an acted film.

        So…yeah, it’s gross. EVEN IF her intent was to highlight a problem, she had to participate in the very kind of hypersexualization of young girls that age claims horrifies her in order to make her point.

        Reply
  4. AvatarJohn C.

    Don’t be so sure the ethnic change can’t be reversed. In Algeria, the 10 percent of the country that were European or Jewish were called blackfoots. Their feet were in Africa, and their hearts were in Europe. They played an outsized role in the economy. Less than a week after independence, the European quarter of the major cities were invaded and looted. The blackfoots streamed to an unwelcoming France who thought them Nazis. The Algerian government declared European and Jewish owned property abandoned and property was confiscated without payment. A populist French President might feel turnaround is fair play.

    Reply
    • AvatarPanzer

      For once I think you may be actually right about something amazingly.
      In Germany, the ‘far right’ now has as much support as the mainstream left, brexit is happening with a conservative government that has an unarguable mandate and in France Marine le Pen almost won an election..
      There’s a war coming.

      Reply
      • AvatarJohn C.

        You already see in Paris the yellow vests wanting the return of the affordable quarter of Paris returned to the native working class from the ethnics it was turned over to. Populist British also noticed when that welfare housing high rise in upscale Kensington burned how none of the occupants were natives. The ethnics being in certain areas only makes it easier. It happened in Algeria in a few months. A government with chartered planes waiting for them could have it done even quicker.

        Reply
    • AvatarRonnie Schreiber

      The Jews of Algeria were Mizrachi, aka Sephardi, of Middle Eastern origin, and had lived there long before it was a French colony. They had greater cultural ties to North Africa and the Levant than they did to Europe.

      Reply
      • AvatarJohn C.

        That was the point of mentioning them separately. Though some had French citizenship from the overseas department of France phase of colony, they were not French, just no longer welcome in independent Algeria. It is my understanding, and I am not the ultimate authority, that Jews in places like Tangier and Algiers had left Spain with the Moors.

        Reply
  5. AvatarGene B

    I know a lot of you are not religious or even spiritual, but the reality is that there is mush more going on. As an Orthodox Christian, I can tell you there is a TON of prophetic material written about the end times, and many people understand these are the signs of the times. YOU have to take to time and do your own research. All of what is going on has been foretold. Most will say “it’s nonsense”. For those that can hear, let them hear. Here is a clue: google “The Esoteric Meaning of Lucifer”. You will come to Lucis Trust, the organization that runs the prayer room at the UN. Read it carefully. It’s the opposite of the fall. These are the guys behind the movie and the promotion of it. CONNECT THE DOTS PEOPLE AND WAKE UP.

    Reply
  6. AvatarPaul M.

    I hate vinyl, fake leather, leatherette, whatever vegan name they want to give it. That stuff does not breath. It may in the long term last longer, but it will tear in a bad way. I recall my 1979 Chevy Caprice, a decent car in all ways except for the crappy vinyl interior that froze my butt in cold Indiana winter days and scorched me in summer. My next car was a Beretta. What a mistake. Yet, i was dead set on cloth interior. Never again. Hate cloth. I like to eat in my car. A lot of chocolates. Think Snickers, Twix, Kit-Kat, … When chocolate gets on cloth it leaves a residue that is hard to impossible to get rid of, particularly when you rub it in. Leather for me, all day every day. In fact I get Katzkin Leather. Custom stuff on my Grand Cherokee. Service department always gives me complements on how unique and pretty it is (brownish but not too dark with green exterior). And it wears beautifully. Leather is the way to go.

    Reply
    • Avatarstingray65

      The vinyl seat covering used by US brands in the 1960-70s never seemed to hold up more than a few years before splitting/cracking in one of the high stress areas and looking like crap – I can’t speak for more recent versions since it hasn’t been very popular since then. The vinyl the Europeans use seems to be much better stuff and often lasts for decades without splitting or cracking, and in fact typically lasts longer and looks better longer than leather unless the leather is coated in plastic to make it hold up better. It will be interesting to see how the perforated vinyl and leather seats that are increasingly common will hold up – I can imagine it might end up splitting and cracking early.

      Reply
      • AvatarPaul M.

        Perhaps. But I am leather all the way. Here in Atlanta we even had our dining room chairs made with genuine leather by Rafael who does custom upholstery. A little dark secret, Mexicans are the best pure upholsterers in the world. By hand old world way. If you find a shop with a Mexican running the upholstery go for it. My dining room tables are Parsons but with real genuine leather made from scratch. Not cheap as each hide is about 1000 and each hide can only cover 2 chairs. Add to that 500 for labor. But the workmanship and quality is better than anything even Ethan Allen can sell you.

        Reply
      • Avatarjc

        I question whether “European vinyl” will hold up any better to the inevitable UV embrittlement of the Southwestern US, than did the horrible stuff in US cars in the 70s that would always split after a few years.

        Europeans are not always aware that there are other climates than theirs.

        Reply
    • AvatarCompaq Deskpro

      Just go to Autozone and get Oxyclean stain remover with the brush on the cap, chocolate smudge stains come right out, and my interior will never have rips like leather always does.

      Reply
    • Avatarrpn453

      That was a chilling read. Imagine wanting to buy a new car and the only seating material available is plastic. Equally unpleasant at -40C and +40C!

      I think Jack’s right though; it’s coming. Hopefully the technological singularity wipes us out first.

      Reply
      • Avatar-Nate

        TOPIC DRIFT : Seat Upholstery

        FWIW, the basic vinyl stuff used on American and Japanese cars from the late 1950’s on wards was pretty bad, you had to be there to fully grasp how bad .

        Nevertheless beginning in the late 1950’s many European cars came with good, reasonably comfy synthetic seat covers that were easy to clean and very long lasting .

        I’m ever so fond of Mercedes’ “M-B Tex” ~ it’s durable and doesn’t burn you in Summer nor crack in Winter and it’s easy to clean, far easier than any fabrics .

        Most people, even used parts sellers, think it’s leather when it isn’t .

        One of our Foster boys got a new 2016 Honda Civic 4 door with cloth seats and he went off the rails and smoked dope and ate God alone knows what in the car, since I repossessed it I’ve tried every thing I’ve ever learned in my 50 + years of reconditioning used cars and the seats (ALL of them) still have nasty stains and it stinks of pot inside……

        I’m looking for a local place that has hand held steamers next .

        For Blue Collar working class types who have to drive home dirty and apparently teenagers, cloth isn’t going to make the cut .

        -Nate

        Reply
  7. AvatarScott

    “I didn’t watch the movie but here’s a whole piece based on what the internet says to think about it” — I can get that lack of intellectual curiosity or rigor anywhere else on the internet. You’re better than that, Jack.

    (Your whole piece may have been spot on: I haven’t watched the movie either. But that’s beside the point.)

    Reply
    • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

      I read five comprehensive reviews of it, and watched the Netflix preview. As much as I like my readers, I’m not going to consume 105 minutes of child porn for them or anyone else.

      Reply
      • AvatarKevin Jaeger

        I agree with you there. I’ve seen screenshots of twerking girls and them grabbing their crotches and that is already much more than I wanted or needed to see.

        Maybe there is indeed a problem of young girls imitating rap videos that needs to be addressed but this movie isn’t it, and I don’t need to actually watch it to know that much. Making this film required actually recruiting these young girls and making them do all that stuff in front of the cameras. I have low expectations of our ruling classes but I didn’t think we have gone so far that they aren’t revolted by that.

        But then I’m reminded of Epstein and Hollywood’s reaction to Roman Polanski, and California’s recent pedo law and I realize we’ve descended very far indeed.

        Reply
      • AvatarVojtěch Dobeš

        Next time, try using Wikipedia. Unlike what you guessed by reading the review, which are, quite obviously avoiding spoilers, she rejects BOTH her family’s religion (not going to her father’s second wedding) and the pop/porn culture, replacing her dacing outfit with a jeans and a T-shirt and going out to play like a normal girl.

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cuties#Plot

        Reply
          • AvatarVojtěch Dobeš

            It sure does change the outcome of the movie – your article was based on the assumption that it makes her being part of this group of child pop-porn stars a good thing and that it therefore defends sexualization of children.

            In fact, it seems to portray this thing as negative and be a critique of sexualization of young kids.

            That still leaves the door wide open for debate on whether the movie appropriate or not, and I don’t have a clear opinion of that – to that I would have to see it and at the same time I probably don’t want to see it, for reasons similar to yours. But it’s a difference.

          • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

            Tossing a bone to the normies at the end doesn’t justify the film. Its content places it beyond the Pale of art into pornography. The decision to treat pornography as art is how we got to where we are now.

          • AvatarKevin Jaeger

            Correct. If this were just a screenplay or even an animated film them maybe you could have that type of debate. But this was made with real girls and that should frankly end the debate in any civilized society. The fact that it has not is a very sad statement on the state of our world today.

            Of course watching Hollywood give Roman Polanski a standing ovation should have been a huge warning. And of course the inexplicable treatment of Epstein for decades remains unexplained.

          • AvatarRonnie Schreiber

            The decision to treat pornography as art is how we got to where we are now.

            The same folks who argue that nudity is a form of expression protected by the First Amendment are also telling us that the state has the power to tell us that we have to wear face masks.

            It seems to me under Tinker v Des Moines that if the state does not have the right to tell a high school kid he can’t wear an anti-war armband to school then the state likewise does not have the right to tell people they have to wear masks.

            Note: I’ve been telling people since January that if they were worried about the new virus from China they should go to Home Depot or Lowe’s and get some 3M or Honeywell N95 respirators or masks. I wear a mask when property owners require it or when I’m in a crowd of people.I refuse to wear a mask when I’m walking down the street, that’s just play acting.

            I’m thinking of selling lawn signs and masks imprinted with “I’m Morally Superior”.

      • Avatarsilentsod

        Hell, I cancelled my Netflix subscription for the poster alone. Their weak ass defense was exactly that and the film itself, well, I know porn when I see it.

        Reply
  8. AvatarTyler

    May we assume there’s no sense waiting on Mr and Mrs Obama to produce a film about a gaggle of preteen immigrant girls in China? Indonesia? India? Turkey? No? Just in France?

    Reply
  9. AvatarRonnie Schreiber

    technical violation of statutory rape laws

    Are there any statutory rapes that aren’t technical violations? A statutory crime is the definition of a technical violation.

    Reply
    • Avatar98horn

      Most crimes in the United States are codified. So If I murder someone, I’ve committed a technical violation of a statutory crime (that is, I meet all the enumerated elements of the statute). Having sex with children is illegal because they are not adults, and cannot consent from a legal point of view. From a moral point of view, it’s simply repugnant.

      Reply
  10. AvatarJMcG

    “We are coming for your kids, and we have all the tools we need to do it”. This, this is what the world is now about. Thank you Jack for putting into a few words what I have been thinking. They are NOT getting mine.

    Reply
  11. AvatarRonnie Schreiber

    Meanwhile, a major political party nominee for president of the United States took an interview with a singer who is getting grade school girls to talk about their wet ass pussies.

    Reply
      • Avatardejal

        A progressive posted a CSPAN clip of Biden grouping young girls.
        Twitter Bans Videos of Biden Touching Girls Over ‘Child Sexual Exploitation’ Rules, Users Observe

        Sputnik News.

        Twitter is deleting news videos of Joe Biden being inappropriate with young girls accusing the Democrat’s critics of breaking ‘child sexual exploitation’ rules, Texan progressive activist Johnny Graz said.

        Reply
      • AvatarRonnie Schreiber

        Frankly, I’d have a hard time choosing which I’d rather watch less, Cuties or a Cardi B video. I had to drive out to Owosso today to get a hot foil stamping die to use for branding Harmonicasters and listened to Patsy Cline’s greatest hits on the way there. A couple of the songs are of the “why don’t I love my man the way I love you” variety. One of them sufficed to say “tingles” instead of giving a clinical description of her level of vaginal lubrication and she still managed to make it a hit. Imagine that.

        Reply
        • AvatarJohn C.

          Interesting that Ronnie equates Cardi B to Patsy Cline. Makes you want to go walking after midnight and wonder why Ronnie thinks of a way to defend Cardi B? Could it be that that her management is more Jewish than black. No, it couldn’t be?

          Reply
          • AvatarRonnie Schreiber

            Where did I defend Cardi B and how did I equate Patsy Cline with her? With all due respect, sir, you’re out of your mind. I already made it clear that I have no interest in Cardi B’s “music”, while I spent money on a Patsy Cline CD, so I obviously think Cline is a more worthy musician. I had no idea who Cardi B’s management is or what their religious or ethnic backgrounds might be until you brought the topic up. It appears that she currently has no manager. Her previous manager Klenord “Shaft” Raphael, is suing her for $10 million. From photos, it appears that he’s black.

          • AvatarCJinSD

            I didn’t find what Ronnie wrote to be particularly confusing. My takeaway was that pop music could successfully address the physical aspects of attraction without being repellently vulgar. He was contrasting Patsy Cline to Cardi B, not drawing a parallel between them. Don’t let your hatred make you stupid. Next thing you know you’ll be a Biden voter.

  12. AvatarDRSmith

    Delete Netflix (which my wife and I have done) and blame it on THEM (i. .e the global Cabal/demcrates/FaceTube/etc..). I don’t really care nor does my wife, but my 10 year old daughter cares about not having Netflix quite a bit. Next up – marital arts & firearms training. My sincere hope is that by the time she is twentry, she will be leading a milita against the Empire in the upcoming global war against Satan.

    Reply
  13. Avatarhank chinaski

    This has been scaling up for decades. Recall Jon Benet Ramsey’s death and child beauty pageants. Also, much less risque, from ‘Donnie Darko’ (2001) but clearly on the way down:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=njEuEZitqX8

    The media’s mental gymnastics in ‘Cuties’ defense is telling. Is this the Streisand Effect for ratings or do they really believe what they are spouting?

    As always, the Bee has it nailed: https://babylonbee.com/news/new-netflix-movie-actually-murders-puppies-to-teach-that-murdering-puppies-is-bad/

    Reply
  14. Avatar-Nate

    GAH .

    kiddie porn ?! .

    This is so far beyond the pale I almost can’t imagine it but for the many American men I’ve known who bragged about their love of diddling children .

    No one needs to see this crap to know it’s wrong .

    -Nate

    Reply
    • AvatarCJinSD

      You really hate America. Did you know that you’re an American man? Projecting your self-hatred onto others is your go-to move. Why is it that ‘American men’ are comfortable telling you that they diddle children? Nobody has ever said anything like that to me. Oh yeah. You’re a Democrat.

      Reply
  15. Avatargtem

    Not much more to be said on Cuties: think of all of the hundreds of well paid adults this passed by at Netflix that okay’d this, and let that sink in. We desperately need a return of obscenity laws and regulation of Hollywood/media production. Anyone who still identifies as a Libertarian in 2020, time to do some soul searching.

    Onto car seating materials: I desperately miss quality high-pile velours and tweed cloth that used to be everywhere including on the cheapest of economy cars. I’m blessed in that my 2006 Suburban LS has the excellent cloth seats. My brother’s 250k mile ’96 Mystique has excellent cloth seats as well. Our more luxurious Town&Country Touring-L has “leather” heated seats, but they are the rubberiest feeling things I’ve seen. Now, I don’t mind, as the primary kid hauler this material is perfect. With that and some rubber floor mats, it’s basically impregnable. My family’s old 1990 Civic Wagon had very nice tweed cloth, chrome door pulls, soft vinyl trim with some more of that tweed on the door cards. I’ve spent some time in a friend’s ’17 Civic and it has the nastiest neoprene-like cloth, with horrible uneven stitching on the seams. It looks like the $40 waterproof seat covers I bought for my 2012 Civic a few years ago when I dabbled in rideshare driving. Cost cutting at its worst.
    Embarrassing. An aside, a lot of newer Hondas I’ve seen (current gen CRVs especially) have the ghastliest most uneven panel gaps I’ve seen this side of a Moskvitch 412. What the hell is going on over there?

    Reply
    • Avatargtem

      Oh and a special shout-out to Nissan, that will sell you an Armada SV with a wonderful 1980s-Japan velour cloth, with diamond quilting and contrast-color piping. This is purely a function of the Armada being ported over to the US market with some leftover artifacts of the home market. If I have to replace my Suburban any time soon, it will be with one of those Armadas.

      Reply
        • Avatargtem

          Strong values as 1-2 year old cars. Hell of a motor. Shame about the IRS for towing, but I guess some inside-the-coil helper air springs are cheap and easy to install. Looks good with the rationally sized 18s with 70 series sidewalls. I test drove an ex-rental (most of them are) at Carmax and liked it a lot.

          Reply

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