(Last) Weekly Roundup: When I Rose To Be Ossified Edition

I turned 49 a couple of weeks ago. On the face of it, this seems ridiculous. At this age, my grandfather was wrapping up his career and preparing to retire nice and early in his mid-fifties. When my father was forty-nine years old, he was just a half-decade away from heading to Hilton Head and concentrating on golf. They were adults, y’know? They knew who they were and where they were going. I didn’t observe any significant change in them after this age. (Not much before, either, to be honest.)

Your humble author, on the other hand, is far from being settled in any sense. I have no idea where I’m going to live in a few years. Don’t know what job I’ll be working, whether I will be richer or poorer. I might save up and buy my destination race car, a Radical SR8 — or I might sell all the race cars and never think about that again. Could build a new house, or I could live in a condo. No matter what happens, I still expect to be: intemperate, easily distracted, riding children’s bicycles, playing great guitars badly, continually and heartlessly tortured by the basest and most juvenile of desires.

Not a grown-up, in other words. And yet I can dimly perceive the edge of a certain… process… going on in my mind. The same way that one’s near-field vision is just great until it isn’t — but you knew it was going bad nevertheless. Something terrible is happening to me. Perhaps it’s accelerated by this oh-so-manufactured crisis all around us, perhaps not. Can’t say. Anyway. What’s going on is this: I’m losing what we will, for lack of a better phrase, call emotional elasticity.

We all know that old people are fussy, finicky, unwilling to change their minds, unable to effectively consider alternate viewpoints, and so on. It’s not something that happens the day you get your AARP card. It’s a process. As a child you’re malleable, you roll with whatever changes are presented to you. Over time you lose your instant willingness to adapt or accept. Your mind turns inward; you don’t listen as much to other people, new music, recent research, and so on. The future becomes less interesting, the past more so.

It’s happening to me. I finally gave up on pop music about a year ago; the mumblecore rap-crap and Auto-Tuned obscenities have become too much for me to accept. Intellectually I know this stuff is no more or less vacant of value than, say, the forgettable ditties of the Fifties or the bulk of RUN-DMC’s work; emotionally, however, I’m revolted by it. Virtually all of the new fiction I see now strikes me as mewling trash written by the subliterate for the illiterate. Is it any worse than the Marie Calloway book? Nah — but that came out when I was 42.

I’ve started deliberately avoiding people, largely because I’d rather not spend any processing cycles on hearing what they have to say. Over the past couple of years I followed my son as he hopped across video games, but his latest hop (from Fortnite to Among Us) just seems like too much trouble. Worst of all, I’ve started reading books about history, which is the gold standard for approaching senility and/or dissolution of intellectual curiosity.

All of this was put into sharp relief by the arrival of a Genesis G90 Ultimate 5.0 to my house on Tuesday. My God, did they build this thing just for me or what? It glides along every road surface in perfect serenity. I can listen to all my old music in it, and it all sounds great. Driver comfort is total and unwavering, as is noise suppression. Most of the time, it drives itself down any marked road while I rest an indifferent thumb (or, whisper it, knee) on the wheel. It has zero implied prestige or road presence, so people ignore me when I drive it, which is nice. What would be even nicer would be if I had someone to drive me around in it. That would be best. Then I could just read a book in silence.

I’ve owned a lot of big, bland sedans, of course. What’s changed is my approach to them. I drove my Phaetons like a madman and customized them to insure that everyone knew that it was my car. Today, I could own this grey G90 just the way it comes and not put so much as a license plate frame on it. I should have been a pair of ragged claws scuttling across the floors of silent seas. I see myself lately as a coelacanth, this spectacularly ugly and unbearably ancient creature dragging itself along the ice-cold ocean floor and eating scraps. Scientists couldn’t figure out how they went two hundred years thinking the coelacanth was extinct. I can tell them: it was because the fish in question had nothing he wanted to share with the world.

The average middle-aged fellow is spectacularly and grossly unaware that this ossification is happening to them; I know a half-dozen fifty-something men who have cheerfully mistaken their own decline for a general or global equivalent. Hint: Any time you hear some old dude going on about how they drove all the fast cars and engaged in all the misbehavior but the next generation needs to live responsibly, that’s brain rot in process. My own guiding principles (“live in reality”, “keep a consciousness loop at all times”) have allowed, perhaps forced, me to see the shadow even as it creeps across my mind. Gonna fight it, that’s what I’m gonna do. In this effort, I am enlisting all of you. If you see me exhibiting the brittle and ignorant attitude of the aging bon vivant, please call me out without hesitation. Thank you, in advance, for your support. Now, if you’ll excuse me, I’m going to put on Kind Of Blue and read a book about the Spanish Civil War.

* * *

Last week, at Hagerty, I managed to discuss one Chrysler and drive another one.

145 Replies to “(Last) Weekly Roundup: When I Rose To Be Ossified Edition”

    • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

      Do you disagree? Do you think we needed to shutter 100,000-plus small businesses and put the country out of work for something that kills one in five thousand people?

      Reply
      • AvatarLynnG

        Jack,
        I could pretty well say, I know you have read and hopefully seen “Blade Runner.”
        So yes there is a manufactured crisis because those thousands of small businesses provide opportunities for upward mobility or a voice for the “little people” therefore they must be eliminated. As was clearly demonstrated over the last four years as our President, while maybe not the perfect vessel, gave voice to the forgotten “little people.” The powers that be (Tyrell Corporation aka (Amazon/Facebook/Apple/Bloomburg Media) spent untold billions of dollars and even more billions of television minutes and words in print to undermine him at every turn. So yes we have a manufactured crisis and as always the American private sector responed to the crisis and hopefully we will have a vacine in the next several months and all the little people will go back into their corner and be quite…..

        The above is the authors own idea and in no way should be interperted to mean the author knows what he is talking about….

        Happy Thanksgiving to all and be careful out there…. Lynn

        Reply
        • Avatarcoreytrevor

          All trump did was point out that the common man was struggling, but what policies did he attempt to enact that would combat this? Also, he lost the war with his own party that was unwilling to do anything about these issues anyway. He truly must have had dementia to think the slightly more corporatist of the two parties would be the right vehicle for populism.

          Reply
          • Avatardejal

            So, what other path is there? Trump says in 2015/16, nah running as a R doesn’t work, I’ll run as an independent!!! That’ll work!!!

          • Avatar-Nate

            Saying ‘one out of five thousand will die’ is disingenuous ~ a better way to look at it is : already 250,000 + Americans have died , that’s not a small number .

            Plus millions sick and out of work and the hospitals are reaching capacity ~ New York City (yes, I know it’s an open toilet bowl) is still keeping covid-19 cadavers in refer truck because no place else to put them and a backlog of autopsies is huge .

            if it were anyone in your family you’d be screaming and trying to figure out a way to blame it on leftist lib’rals or socialists .

            Just because fox news and breitbart et. al say the science isn’t there, doesn’t make it so and you all well know it .

            America was founded specifically to not be selfish and only supportive of the ruling class .

            I wonder how some of you sleep at night .

            We now know several who are fighting this covid-19 illness, luckily not out children or immediate relatives but I cannot just stand there with my thumb up my ass like you and shrug .

            For those who are derisive of trump’s chances, I was surprised he didn’t win this time and if/when he makes a 2024 run don’t expect him to lose .

            -Nate

          • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

            Nate, because I love you I’m going to provide you with some free mathematical context. 24,069 people have died of WuFlu in NYC. In 2017, more than 176,000 people died in NYC from all causes.

            If you think an increase in deaths of 15% means the city collapses and starts leaving bodies in meat lockers, there’s nothing I can do to help you.

            But thats not all. Deaths from all other medical causes have decreased significantly in 2020. In particular, deaths due to influenza, which have been as high as 61,000 in a single year lately, have declined to… zero?

            Oh and there’s the woman I know who lost her parents to a brain hemorrhage and pancreatic cancer this year. Guess how both deaths were recorded on the autopsies? You get three guesses and the first two don’t count.

            We have crippled this country in ways that will haunt us for decades to… what, exactly? What have we gained, other than record profits for Amazon and Netflix?

      • AvatarKoR

        The smart thing to do, one may surmise, is to prop up the small businesses and working class at the expense of the precious coffers of the rich and powerful in order to to stop the spread of a virus that has now killed about 265k people.

        But because it is the coffers of the rich and powerful that would need pillaging, that simply cannot be. And so it is, we’ll do very marginally more in a Biden administration (Maybe another stimulus. Maybe some protections for the 6 million or so Americans facing eviction. Maybe a strong “hey wear a mask so you don’t accidentally kill a grandma” stance instead of the marked indifference to human life seen currently), but it won’t really change enough in the dozen or so ways it needs to in order to save the republic.

        There is a rot in this country, and the vast majority of it stems from a frankly terrifying level of wealth inequality. The virus continues to exacerbate that. My 401k is doing great! My neighbor is not.

        Reply
        • AvatarRonnie Schreiber

          ” Maybe a strong “hey wear a mask so you don’t accidentally kill a grandma” stance instead of the marked indifference to human life seen currently”

          The vast majority of masks people are wearing are not N, P, or R95 rated, what is needed to trap particles the size of viruses. Of those who are wearing 95 rated masks, the vast majority are not wearing them effectively. For a protective mask or respirator to work effectively, it must seal *tightly* against the wearer’s face. I know that because I worked in a paint laboratory and had to regularly undergo respirator fit testing. If you had facial hair, or if the mask was loose, you’d fail the test.

          Now that’s putting aside the recent study from Denmark that shows that asymptomatic Covid positive folks aren’t infectious, so if you’re not symptomatic and you’re wearing a mask, you aren’t protecting anyone. Likewise, if you’re wearing a mask and you’re not exposed to anyone symptomatic the mask is doing nothing to protect you or others. Complete theater and virtue signalling.

          Then there’s the Johns Hopkins study that showed that Covid has not increased the number of annual deaths, which was subsequently deleted because ““the article was being used to support false and dangerous inaccuracies about the impact of the pandemic.”

          Lots of Orwellian stuff going down right now, but you’re cool with it because your political tribe benefits. It’s quite sad to see the number of Americans who are more embarrassed by Donald Trump’s persona than they are embarrassed by their side cheating to win.

          My question to Democrats is, “If Donald Trump is truly the monster you have been saying he is for the past four years, why wouldn’t you cheat to remove him from office? Wouldn’t that be the moral thing to do?” If you had a time machine, would you let baby Hitler live?

          As for “wealth inequality”, under Trump that gap has been reduced. While all income level groups showed increased incomes (the 2019 figures were the best in history) it was the lower income tiers that showed the greatest percentage growth.

          Reply
          • AvatarRasputin1919

            Mr. Schreiber, your facts will fall on deaf ears. Progressivism is a religion – one subscribes to it because one “believes” in it with all their heart. Contrary facts are heresy and, other than attempting to eliminate the source, are ignored.

  1. AvatarNewbie Jeff

    “I’m losing what we will, for lack of a better phrase, call emotional elasticity”

    “I finally gave up on pop music”

    “I’ve started deliberately avoiding people, largely because I’d rather not spend any processing cycles on hearing what they have to say”

    Would just like to say all of this started with me about the time I turned 31…

    Reply
  2. Avatar-Nate

    Maybe so ~

    My oldest friend who’s never been a social butterfly, is sick with the covid19 now, can’t talk and has never had a computer nor cell ‘phone and I doubt he’s been to a bar or party in his entire life .

    I imagine he caught it on the MTA in Boston .

    Yes, I understand this is wrecking the economy, L.A. is bursting with folks who lost their jobs and then homes .

    I’m no Monday morning quarterback so I have no solutions other than maybe stop lying and ignoring science .

    BTW : this changing of thoughts is called GROWING UP and is not popular in America, land of endless childhood .

    -Nate

    Reply
    • AvatarNewbie Jeff

      “I’m no Monday morning quarterback so I have no solutions other than maybe stop lying and ignoring science”

      I’m pretty much at the point that anyone who’s lecturing me to “follow the science” probably doesn’t really know what the science actually is, or doesn’t realize that they’re being manipulated by politicized, biased “science”. P.S. that means they’re lying to you.

      Example: wearing masks has become like a fundamentalist religion and if you actually read studies on mask efficacy, the real results are inconclusive at best. The people shouting “follow the science!” have perverted real science by extracting cherry-picked pieces of results and then ran with it… thus, this being America in 2020, some idiot with a piece of t-shirt wrapped around his face calls you the idiot because you didn’t prostrate before the policy of bureaucrats and talking heads who have literally been wrong at every turn of the pandemic.

      https://www.cochranelibrary.com/cdsr/doi/10.1002/14651858.CD006207.pub5/full

      https://www.cebm.net/covid-19/masking-lack-of-evidence-with-politics/

      Reply
      • AvatarDan

        “… wearing masks has become like a fundamentalist religion …”

        The most valuable thing that we threw away with real religion was sharing it.

        Reply
  3. AvatarWayne Krennerich

    Haven’t driven the G90, own a 2017 G80 Ultimate. Best sedan I’ve ever owned. Maybe I’ll spring for the G90 next as my retirement car.

    Reply
      • AvatarKen

        Jack –
        Not sure if the comments are the best way to reach out. (I know you listed an email address on here once, but apologies I can’t seem to find it on prior articles or on this site.)

        I have a bit of a car dilemma that I think you’re well positioned to advise. My Wife (and I mean this in the most complimentary way possible, and only in the sense of car taste) is a mid-30s Jack when it comes to full size luxury sedans.

        We’re (well she) is looking for something with some presence (but not look at me presence) that’s AWD, relatively quick (in a get out of it’s own way sense), fun to drive (in that it can corner without the need to do ab exercises and hold the Jesus handle) and, above all, comfortable (quiet & absorbs bumps).

        We’re also looking for (well I am) reliability, some ease to perform home mechanic work, and US assembly / construction. (Or at the least no China.)

        We plan to (and typically do) keep cars for 10 years Holding value doesn’t matter as much as the above mentioned points. The car that will be soon replaced is a 2007 Lincoln MKZ AWD that we’ve had since 08. It’s actually been a pretty good car (we made a few go-fast and suspension improvements as well).

        Looking to stay around mid-30s. Which puts us in 1-2 year old certified used territory. JUST starting the process and the short list includes:

        – Lincoln Continental
        – Volvo S90
        – Cadillac CT6
        – Lincoln MKZ
        – And now the Genesis

        Any thoughts? My wife likes the above for looks, size, and features (we’ll be test driving them soon to see if they meet her comfort and driving feel criteria).

        For me, I’ve started to research engine and reliability. I’m partial to the 3.5 / 3.7 V6 Ford Duratec that’s been around for decades. The one in our MKZ had minimal issues (although a water pump design from that era was quite poor and expense to fix).

        Reply
        • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

          If you don’t mind, I’ll use this for an Ask Jack on Hagerty next week.

          Short answer, however: can’t go wrong with a Continental. The Genesis G80 AWD 3.8 would be a good choice as well. My brother just bought a two-year-old example and he loves it.

          Reply
          • AvatarKen

            Don’t mind at all. That would be great. Appreciate it!

            Also started looking at the 300C/Charger based on your Hagerty article as well.

          • Avatardanio

            You’ll appreciate what you’ll get in a full jam 300C for the price they’re available for at the 1-2 year mark. Last week I picked up a low mile 2018C Platinum Hemi for far under your budget.

        • AvatarMark

          Chrysler obviously competes in a lesser segment than the others, but a 300C with full-leather interior (including doors, dash, and center console) and genuine wood trim ups the luxury feel considerably. Shared links to some images a bit further downthread. Assembly is in Canada, though, not U.S.

          Reply
    • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

      If I’d lived simply from the ages of 30-49 I probably could have put an average of $75-100k into the market annually, so I’d be looking at perhaps five million dollars now. Surely enough to retire on. And yet I have to wonder who I would be if I’d done that. There are so many things I’ve done that are already beyond my ability to duplicate them, just due to age and wear. From time to time I meet readers who have had outstanding self-discipline, who have managed to save their way into financial independence. By and large they have a fascinating voyeur’s view of the world; they can tell you chapter and verse about what they’ve observed in others, and they have many ideas as to what they might do in the future, but their lives have been blank.

      Reply
      • AvatarTexn

        My prior post was sarcasm, focused the statements from others about how we (upper middle class white males) could all enjoy a comfortable retirement if the Japanese had never peddled those wares here.

        But, to your point and my own self reflection. I’m only 37 and headed down the path of many you mention. Because that’s what my dad did and what his dad did. Before that, it was always scrapping by in a small Italian mountain village.

        I want to be/stay financially secure, for myself and my family, but I’ve also begun to realize that I’m pissing time away…and more worried about pissing money away. I’d say the best thing about 2020 is that realization.

        I’m rambling at this point but my point is, there is more to life than hoarding cash to die in a sort of isolation. It’s time for me to start writing those chapters, and I can do it with what I already have (great family, job, locale, etc…).

        Reply
        • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

          I was too thick to realize what you meant; my personal balance of payments with Honda is very good, for every dollar I’ve given them they’ve given me ten. I’d like to think that Honda didn’t harm Michigan as much as they’ve helped Ohio.

          Reply
          • AvatarJohn C.

            I am one of those, one of one?, that thinks seriously Honda shouldn’t have been allowed in. That said, it is interesting so many years later Honda guys sniffing around the Koreans instead of say the Legendary RLX Acura. The answer why seems to be in maturity they crave something more American. Ironic but maybe predictable.

          • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

            There’s no easy answer, even in hindsight. Harley-Davidson used a tariff to survive; perhaps the American automakers could have done the same. In the UK, they made every effort possible to salvage the domestic auto industry and they failed utterly.

            That being said, my job has allowed me to meet a fairly large number of “important people” in Detroit. By and large, these people were arrogant, ignorant, entitled, and insular. They had a low opinion of the customer and of the worker alike. They behaved more like royalty than business leaders. Honda doesn’t work that way. It was instructive to see how they dealt with a bad Accord (in 2010) and Civic (in 2011). They made significant changes in the mid-cycle to address customer complaints, particularly with the sporting models. And then they made sure that the next generation of Accord and Civic were beyond reproach.

            Not that Honda does have its own stubbornness when it comes to product and people. The hybrid CR-Z never should been released in that format — and yeah, the RLX is a complete loser of a car. Honda is too stubborn to admit that an oversized Accord can’t cut the mustard in that market. That being said, if you’re also stubborn enough to buy one you’ll be stuck with it for 250,000 miles or more. They are built to mil-spec standards.

          • AvatarJohn C.

            I wish you were alone in the view that important people in Detroit deserved to die because they didn’t live up to your rose colored view of the Honda man. How Americans can think that baffles.

          • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

            I’m not offering a “rose colored view”. I’m telling you about my actual experience with these people. I worked for Honda. I know how things are done there.

            And I’m not suggesting they deserved to die. What I’m telling you is that the Detroit leadership knew what was happening, and they didn’t care. So why should we?

          • AvatarJohn C.

            I understand Jack. We are of the same generation. I understand how excited you must have been to be in that room where Honda decisions were made. As a young up and comer, how lucky you must have felt. Living the the dream that Csere, Yates, and Cepos told you was out there when you were a kid. Now you were there while your Gods were telling you whats what. It was hard to notice that somehow you were building family cars and crossovers instead of Sis. That was always the intent, though at some level you were smart enough to notice. Understand that a generation before you, were people like you enamored with Harley Earle listening to GM explaining why the x car was like it was. There is nothing new.

          • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

            To the contrary, I hated working for Honda. The hours were terrible, and the actual minutes were even worse. I had nothing — zero — to do with design, PR, motorsports, or any of that stuff. I was in North American production, making sure the factories ran. The closest thing the company made to an enthusiast product in my factories was the six-speed Acura TL. That doesn’t mean I wasn’t impressed by how the company conducted its business, or by how the company learned from its mistakes.

            I’ll tell you something else about how Honda conducted, and conducts, its business in Ohio. They pay good wages and provide good benefits for entire counties that don’t have a single major business within their borders. They make sure the schools get built and the housing looks safe. You could walk around the Marysville plant all day — a plant that probably provides employment in one manner or another for ten thousand people — and not find three Japanese citizens within its walls. Honda builds more cars in the United States than anywhere else. Read the annual report, and you will see that there are two pillars of the company’s existence: North American production of cars/trucks and Chinese production of 100cc-and-below motorcycles. All the other stuff, the CBR-whatevers and the Africa Twin and the S2000 and the RLX? That’s window dressing. A percent of a percent.

            The cars Honda makes are, by and large, good cars. They last 200,000 miles or more with minimal maintenance. They are safe in a crash. They are affordable to operate. For many people, ownership of a Civic keeps them floating above the poverty line where ownership of an Escort or Citation would have buried them below it. They don’t blow up and kill people. They don’t arrive with brakes that are defective by design. They don’t catch on fire in garages. Everybody knows how to fix them and the parts are dirt cheap.

            Out of the two dozen or so new cars I’ve bought, precisely one has been a Honda. I don’t regret that purchase. It’s a good car, designed by people who care about cars in East Liberty, Ohio and built in Marysville, Ohio. As I noted before, the company has paid me ten dollars for every dollar I paid them. What has GM done for me? Borrowed my tax money to make compliance cars and stage the Chevy Volt Dance. Oh, and did I mention that the torque converter in my $61,000 Silverado just shit the bed at the 48,000 mile mark, thus instantly eclipsing by itself the total cost of maintenance and repair, including tires and oil and scheduled service, required by my Accord in 6.5 years and 87,000 miles?

            You and I agree that the United States has an industry worth preserving. The problem is in finding people within that industry who care as much as we do. Most of them take your business for granted and will laugh behind your back as they take your money.

          • AvatarRonnie Schreiber

            ” I’d like to think that Honda didn’t harm Michigan as much as they’ve helped Ohio.”

            The DuPont paint lab in suburban Detroit where I worked had quite a few people employed supporting Honda’s Marysville paint shop. I’m pretty sure that every automotive vendor in Michigan would be happy to supply Honda, provided they can meet the QC standards.

          • AvatarJohn C.

            There were lots of stories in the runup to the transplant assembly sites opening how local suppliers would benefit. Very few stories of it actually having happened after they opened. If it hasn’t happened yet 38 years after Honda opened, it might be time to give up hope.

          • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

            You’re kidding, right? Honda supports hundreds of suppliers and vendors in Ohio. Everybody from Goodyear/Michelin to the four-man shops that install time clocks and build cafeteria furniture.

            Come to central Ohio some time and count the number of Ridgelines with small business logos on them. It’s not because the Ridgeline is a compelling proposition. It’s because Honda butters their bread.

          • AvatarJohn C.

            Ask yourself what things would look like if the same number of same size cars had been built in MI/OH by the big three. The cars would have been designed in the USA and so employed more American engineers. The transaction prices for the cars would be at least 10 percent less, so the American customer wins. Yet the payroll, both in the plant and at nearby suppliers would be higher due to union wages and staffing levels. Yes the corporate profits would have been less but what there was would have stayed here instead of being off to Japan. The Honda assembly points were better than nothing, but hardly buttered bread like the old big three did.

          • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

            The 7th generation Accord and up were designed in the USA.

            The Accord costs less than a comparable Malibu or Fusion, even though it’s built in the States and those cars are built in Mexico.

            Why? Well, Honda executives rarely make more than $125k. It’s common for people to take a pay cut when they move from the line to management.

          • AvatarJohn C.

            The American market Fusion isn’t made anywhere any more and the Malibu is made in Kansas City. Also I said transaction price.

            Everything I just said is correct and you know it. Stop dancing. You like Hondas no crime there, but acting like they are great for America is wrong.

          • Avatar-Nate

            ” In the UK, they made every effort possible to salvage the domestic auto industry and they failed utterly. ”

            Really ? .

            I’m a serious BMC Fanboi yet I seem to have missed the effort ever made to institute any sort of quality….

            The designs were often ancient or simply weird but the lack of any serious quality control is what killed the British Auto Industry .

            Many Americans continued buying them hoping against hope that this one would be better…

            -Nate

          • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

            I’m referring to efforts on the part of the government, not on the part of the people who actually did the design or construction work.

          • AvatarJohn C.

            Thanks Nate for throwing the British industry in with the important people of Detroit who deserved to die and Jack who chimed in on how great the British government was to try to help. He would say that as the help was handing it over to Honda who turned a RWD 16 valve sports sedan into a 1.3 liter Civic, a RWD V8 touring sedan into a big Accord with a too small engine and put a Land Rover name on a Civic on demand awd tall boy. He must have been devastated that that didn’t work and Honda failed.

            Now where we had 10 British workers it would be generous to think there is still one. In Detroit where there was 10 there is maybe now 2. Even in Japan, where there were 10 there might still be 5. Now of course where there was one in Korea there now is 10 workers and again here is Jack telling it is our duty to send our money to them. Viva the Genesis in Korea. Meet the new boss, smellier than the old boss.

            Jack you mentioned the 7th gen and later Accords being American. Wikipedia list a committee of four names who all sound Japanese. How skechy of American parents to give their kids Japanese names so they would have a leg up in a Honda career

      • AvatarJohn C.

        “Their lives have been blank” I know you are talking about your life in racecars, and sluts. How do you compare that to people who were there and raised their families in intact homes? Do you think that some “luxury” from a Korean cabbage field car matches what your grandfather experienced in his Cadillac? You know it doesn’t. What the blank guy is proud of in his 50s is seeing that his children are are him only better and that him and his wife somehow by the grace of God made it through all the junk thrown there way, Hardly blank.

        Reply
        • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

          Don’t knock racecars or sluts until you’ve spent some time exercising them both past their limits.

          If Cadillac makes a proper Eldorado I’ll buy one. As long as they focus on compact cars and electric toys, I’m afraid I’ll have to either stick with my Lincoln or try my hand with that bean field trash.

          Reply
          • AvatarJohn C.

            “Don’t knock racecars or sluts until you have spent time exercising them past their limits” Comeback of the year ha

            If Cadillac made a proper Eldorado…

            Sulu Sir, We have found a planet overgrown with smelly cabbage, They seem to have some sort of Genesis device poorly resembling what was done on the planet Detroitium before JJ Abrams blew them up.

            Kirk Uhg, it will be a long search for Spock.

          • AvatarLynnG

            Jack, stop braging it is unbecoming… 🙂 🙂 🙂
            However, Cadillac did make a proper Eldorado it was the CT6 Blackwing (I know it has four doors but MB made there premier coupe with four doors also). Unforturnately, Mary pulled the plug before the CT6 Blackwing could really get into enought customers hands to make an impression. It you can get your hands on one though your many contacts, buy it and keep it, it will be only appreciate in value. Mary apparently not wanting to go against the tide of political correctness.
            Unlike your great article on Dodge which just keeps reinventing the 1960’s and apparently keeps selling cars. Sort of like the Checker Marathon taxi cab (build what works and keep building it as long as the customers keep buying, well until GM desides to quite selling you V-8’s and TH-400 transmissions)….

          • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

            I’ve thought long and hard about the CT6 — my natural sympathies are with Cadillac over Lincoln even though I’ve been a multiple Lincoln owner.

            What frustrates me about that car is that it’s as big as a G90 or Continental — in fact, it’s an inch longer — but on the street, and behind the wheel, it comes across as a mid-sizer. I can’t quite figure out why.

          • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

            Going to want to drive it, for sure — but it’s very much Cadillac-as-Burgerkingring-Eater, not Cadillac-as-grown-man’s-reward.

          • AvatarCJinSD

            I suspect that the Cadillac CT6 Blackwing will be little more than life-lesson for anyone who buys one. GM can’t get an all-new engine right out of the box, and they can’t afford to dedicate sufficient development resources to make one work that they sold by the dozen before cancelling. It would be cheaper to do a buy-back, but why bother? The people who still buy their stuff are immune to learning from experience.

        • Avatararbuckle

          Racecars & sluts is one way to go. Being a church deacon, a pillar of the community, and successfully raising a family is another way to go. I would not consider either of those paths “blank”.

          I’d say the “blank” person is the childless, unmarried guy with “likes Star Wars” as his biggest personality trait. His only goal in life is to save every dime from his GloboTech job so that he no longer has to go to his GloboTech job a few years sooner than everyone else.

          Reply
          • AvatarJohn C.

            The GloboTech guys might at least be happy in their routines and productivity. What scares me are the middle age men scheming how to check out of life by figuring how to make it alone on $500 a month in a shack in the country.

          • AvatarRonnie Schreiber

            “Precisely. If I could live my life over again I’d have four sons and fewer suits.”

            As I’ve said to my son, who has three boys, it would probably do you some good to have a daughter.

            They’re a blessing, too, just a different one.

            Daughters are less likely to give you a “Dad, I’m in jail,” phone call. Sons are less likely to give you a “Dad, that loser I’m with knocked me up,” phone call.

          • AvatarCJinSD

            Is that even true anymore Ronnie? A young woman I knew died about two weeks back, and efforts to find information about her disappearance netted multiple arrest records.

  4. AvatarDisinterested-Observer

    Rap ended with Cuban Linx Pt II. And don’t be talking shit about Run DMC. Now Imma go finish Mosley’s “On Borrowed Time” and then maybe re-read “Hell in a Very Small Place” for the tenth time.

    Reply
      • AvatarJMcG

        I couldn’t agree more. I’ve somehow managed to raise four children into adolescence. No tattoos or pregnancies, but most happily, they all loathe rap.

        Reply
          • AvatarDisinterested-Observer

            John, I know you are just a stupid troll and I should not bother to respond. However, sometimes you write something so stupid that it makes me wonder if you know how to read.

          • AvatarRonnie Schreiber

            What’s wrong with loathing rap? Is it any worse than loathing hair metal, death metal, or, for the matter, high opera?

            I love music, have about 600 LPs, a larger number of CDs, and about 400 hours of live tape I’ve either recorded or traded for, representing a fairly wide spectrum of genres, but it’s a very rare opera that will engage me for its duration. With the exception of the famous Vesti La Giubba aria (of which actually only a few measures are well known), Pagliacci is boring. As for rap, which I personally feel was derived by Jamaican “dub” music, I think it was invented so black kids without any appreciable musical talent could be stars too. Compare the sampling, guest vocal breaks, auto-tuning, and pitch correction on a modern hip-hop recording to Stevie Wonder playing all of the instruments on an album. As for metal, my son digs it, much to my chagrin, he was taught better than that, but I find it to be technically proficient but musically ugly.

        • Avatar-Nate

          I raised up a hard working Conservative son who love rap crap when he was about 12, he even once made me a tape I dutifully took to work and listened to, much of it was good lyrics .

          I still prefer music, rap isn’t music, it’s talking to a beat, similar to that crap the beatniks did in the 1950;s, that mostly sucked too .

          Nothing wrong with liking rap, I like The Blues, I don’t play it too loud nor force anyone else to listen to it, therein lies a massive difference .

          -Nate

          Reply
          • AvatarGeorge Denzinger

            “I still prefer music, rap isn’t music, it’s talking to a beat, similar to that crap the beatniks did in the 1950;s, that mostly sucked too.”

            This^^^. I used to think that disco was the most vapid thing I’d ever heard.

            When my kids were teens, they listened to all of the popular rap songs of the time. In the intervening decade to decade and a half, they’ve largely lost their fascination with it.

            Occasionally, I’ll hear a disco song on the oldies radio station and I smile. Mostly because I remember the times, not that the lyrics or accompaniment are so wonderful.

          • Avatar-Nate

            At the time it was new, disco was pretty vapid, not a whole lot of thought went into it, it’s was basic dance and get laid music…

            As you said, now when I hear the Bee Gees on oldies radio it makes me smile .

            -Nate

    • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

      I had a chance to meet him, and to hear him speak, back in 1989. What I primarily remember was that he was physically massive, which never came across in the videos, and that he probably had at least a 120 IQ.

      Reply
  5. Avatartoly arutunoff

    try turning 84, healthy except for temporarily missing most of my right leg. I quit listening to pop about the time of the Kingston trio. big band jazz–kenton–rich–sauter finegan–kenyon Hopkins–king guion–herman–shaw. vocalists: June Christy, Betty Carter, who sang notes that don’t exist (first saw her on snl when it was real). I owned several dealerships, including the first Honda car site in Oklahoma. preferred a Mazda 626 to a Honda: the 626 let me feel the texture of the road through the steering wheel–the last car to do it except for my rx/7 turbo 2 without power steering. wish I had nerve enough to ride my motorbikes. buy my books–I make no $ from them: ‘one off,’ available on the web. ‘steering with your knees’ comes with a t-shirt and a bumpersticker but from me only. crass commercial plug to help today’s people get a view of the way cars were…be well! p.s. masks: the current political version of the 55mph speed limit

    Reply
  6. AvatarDirty Dingus McGee

    Ha. Just wait until around your next birthday. That’s when you start getting mailers from AARP.

    I might be called a science denier, but I guess it depends on which science you choose to believe. The one that says a piece of cotton will protect you from a virus that is 3 times smaller than the pores in a face diaper, or the science that says that 99 percent of people will not die from the virus. The only time I have used a mask is on a plane, where you can’t get on unless you’re wearing one (2 flights since June). Otherwise; you don’t want me in your establishment without a mask, no problem. The store down the street has what I want also, and they don’t require me to wear anything more than normal street clothes.

    Reply
    • AvatarEric H

      I look at it this way.
      Does a mask do me any harm? No.
      Does a mask do me any good? Maybe a little.
      Since it does me no harm and possibly a little good I can tolerate wearing a mask when required, even though it’s stupid.

      Reply
      • AvatarNoID

        I heard it put thusly (or close to it) in a meme: “Y’all who won’t wear a mask in real life because it isn’t very effective would take a free 20% increase in defense on your video games all day long.”

        Reply
        • AvatarDirty Dingus McGee

          I chose to not wear a mask, because it’s as effective as putting up a chain link fence to keep mosquito’s out of my yard.

          Reply
          • AvatarCJinSD

            There are very real health risks associated with wearing a mask. Ask a doctor you trust who trusts you not to turn them in to the communists.

  7. Avatarlh

    About to roll 49, started a nice book on the Reformation recently…as my younger co-worker told me: I’m not a dinosaur, but I’m definitely a caveman.

    Reply
  8. AvatarGeorge Denzinger

    58 this year. I spent the first half of my 50’s trying to deny getting older. FWIW, I got a lot of bad news on and around my 50th birthday; lost three family members in the space of a 18 months and developed a chronic disease, too. Those things set me off on a bad course for a while…

    I found as I got older I liked a quiet car. There was a time that my car had a loud exhaust and a louder sound system; now I drive around with the radio off and the tiniest leak in the exhaust plumbing is an instant call to the repair shop (another result of age).

    It turns out it’s not all bad; the age does impart some perspective that I didn’t have before. I can appreciate women from 21 to over 60 now, something I couldn’t do before. I’d agree that I don’t listen to a lot of music that’s new, I still try to listen to opinions that are not my own, even though I find it highly uncomfortable at times. But, at a certain point, you realize there is only so much time and at least for me, I spent a lot of time taking care of (someone else’s) business and my family. (The men in my family usually don’t get much past 65, although my siblings and I have entirely different lifestyles that should negate some of that. Still, it doesn’t give me much solace knowing that all of the radicchio I’ve swallowed over the years still may not save me from that myocardial infarction or aneurysm that could be headed my way.)

    I want to do stuff for me now.

    Reply
    • Avatar-Nate

      Well said George .

      I’ve been trying to get others to grasp this simple concept for decades ~ go do it NOW .

      Many work hard and save their pennies then get hit by a bus before they’re 45 and miss all the adventure that life can offer .

      It matters not what you do, I don’t suggest anyone follow my path but find something you like or want to do and GO DO IT, if you fins out it wasn’t what you expected, DO SOMETHING ELSE .

      X 1,000 on the Cha-Cha girls, only those who were too afraid to try think otherwise .

      -Nate

      Reply
  9. Avatarhank chinaski

    Getting that first AARP mailer was a chuckle, the first burial plot flyer less so.

    Is the Genny an addition or replacement? Which other vehicle, if any, got the axe?

    I found the Charger’s trunk too small for luggage for four. I’d have chosen the Magnum, but we can’t have nice things. The rental lot had an XTS which served admirably.

    I’m putting my money down now regarding the Kung Flu vaccine: there will be more deaths from side effects in healthy, youngish people than from the virus itself in the same cohort. Also, more deaths by fire/CO poisoning from those outdoor propane heaters than the virus.

    Reply
    • Avatardejal

      “I’m putting my money down now regarding the Kung Flu vaccine: there will be more deaths from side effects in healthy, youngish people than from the virus itself in the same cohort. ”

      Mistakes were made, we meant well.

      I’m not against a vaccine. 330,000,000 people in the country. I’d prefer for a couple of hundred million to take a # in front of me first. I’m a generous person who will gladly give up my place in line. I figure by the time 2XX,XXX,XXX or so take it, we will know. Also, if it is successful, the chances of me catching it without a vaccine go way down anyways because the spread will be lessened.

      Reply
    • AvatarDirty Dingus McGee

      I think the first to get the vaccine should be Bill Gates, Jack Dorsey, Faceborg Zuckerberg and all the politicians. EVERY politician, right down to the local dog catcher and all government workers that slam us with these stupid regulations, mandates, and edict’s.

      If they live, then try it on the rest of the population. If they DON’T survive, nothing was really lost except maybe the development time.

      (but save the first batch for the next round of politicians)

      Reply
        • AvatarDirty Dingus McGee

          I’m an “old white people” who has zero intention of getting their vaccine, so they can test it on whoever they want. I’m on my 64th trip around the sun and have survived all these years without even having a flu shot. I’ve been folded, spindled and mutilated in various car and motorcycle wrecks, fell off a waterfall as a teen and survived the debauchery of my life lived from my 20’s thru my 40’s/early 50’s. It really doesn’t matter to me what I die from, because as grand daddy used to tell me; “Nobody gets out of this life alive”.

          Reply
        • Avatarhank chinaski

          Perfect. A setup for accusations of a new Tuskogee Study.

          I will be shocked if more than a few GloboHomoCorps don’t ‘strongly suggest’ mass vaccination of their lower rank and file.
          The Branch Covidians will line up for this Sacrament enthusiastically, but continue to virtue signal with their mask/vestments.

          Reply
  10. Avatarjimmy

    “I have measured out my life with coffee spoons”

    yes getting old sucks. creeps up on you cool and slow, with plenty of precision

    I’ll tell you this: no eternal reward will forgive us, now

    …for wasting the dawn

    Reply
  11. AvatarThirdOwner

    “My own guiding principles (“live in reality”, “keep a consciousness loop at all times”)”

    The second one is not easy, as it goes counter the mind’s natural tendency to save energy. I still struggle with this daily.

    The first one has been certainly helped by the socio-medical phenomenon you refer to: it brought to crystal clarity how people really think, what they are willing to take, and what they are willing to give up – for themselves, and on your behalf as well.

    Reply
  12. AvatarJMcG

    I can highly recommend a book called “Mine Were of Trouble” by Peter Kemp. It’s a memoir of the Spanish Civil War by, get this, an Englishman who went to Spain to fight for Franco. A completely different perspective from the usual leftist bilge.

    Reply
      • AvatarJMcG

        I’m a recovering Hemingway fan. I can no longer read Across the River and Into the Trees without bursting into laughter. I do still harbor some affection for many of his short stories though.

        Reply
      • AvatarEric H

        It’s OK, you were preoccupied figuring out how to drop a Pink Floyd line in to an article.

        Someday before we retire it, you’re going to have to drive our Fox race car. It got a turbo last off-season. Now with 150+WHP and 170+ torque!

        Reply
        • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

          I think it was actually a misquote… I was in the middle of describing the writer in question as “tongue-tied” and the rest came to me unbidden.

          Reply
    • AvatarJohn C.

      It’s fun to think of volunteers to fight for Franco. You just hear about his Askaris from Africa and those who were perhaps not really volunteers from Germany and Italy. The way the “Republicans” killed Priests and of course lost, you would have thought there would have been more to it. I’ll put the book on my list.

      Reply
      • AvatarJMcG

        The hagiography around the lefties in the Spanish Civil War would be shocking if I still had the capacity to be shocked. It’s hard to put yourself back in the thirties but by 1936 Hitler and Mussolini had killed maybe dozens or hundreds of people while Stalin had millions to his credit by then. The Spanish Republicans lost no time in slaughtering thousands of priests and nuns as soon as the starting gun fired. Yet the conflict is portrayed as a fight for freedom and democracy. An example of a conflict where the losers wrote the history.

        Reply
        • AvatarJohn C.

          The hagiography in some circles had faded by WWII. Veterans of the Abraham Lincoln brigade were understood by the USA to not be trustworthy. Wonder what the deal was with 30s commies appropriating the legacy of Abraham Lincoln?

          Reply
    • AvatarRonnie Schreiber

      I’ve never studied the Spanish Civil War at much depth, but it seems to me to have been more of an intramural conflict on the left than anything else, what with the National Socialists being, you know, socialists.

      Reply
      • AvatarJohn C.

        When Franco faded in the mid 70s he gave the ultimate proof of traditional, small c conservative values, he brought back the King. Too bad the current King didn’t return the favor and stand up when the lefty Satanists desecrated his grave. The Catholic Church of Spain at least tried to stop it.

        Reply
  13. Avataryossarian aka the recovering socialist

    as i’ve posted before, i live in downtown wokeville. my 14 year old daughter has been steeped in the new ideology since day 1 at school. i convinced her yesterday to watch “it’s a wonderful life” with me yesterday. afterwards, we had a talk about the traditional american values in the film. we discussed the depiction of community, gender roles, immigrants, catholics, race relations and most importantly predatory capitalism. i told her that capra was a progressive but today his work is dismissed as patriarchal and in danger of being cancelled. she told me that i shouldn’t assume that the opinions of her peers was the woke extremism that gets amplified by social media. so i got schooled. hope it’s true.

    Reply
  14. Avatarjimlongx

    In reference to the G-90, There’s a car blog by a man named Scotty Kilmer. He claims he’s been a self-employed mechanic for fifty-three years. His take on Genesis brand is “They’re very nice cars when they’re new but they won’t hold up. Buy Toyota.”

    Reply
    • Avatardejal

      That’s his answer for everything. And if not a Toyota, buy a Honda. Swears by Tacoma pickups. Maybe down in Houston back in the day. I’m in Mass. I used to leave for work and drive into Connecticut when it was dark.

      For about 6-9 months, I’d follow a flatbed trailer of squished Tacomas. 6-8 of them. Almost every day. For months.

      The truck would always turn left. One day I followed a bit. Down a side road and then turned right onto a dead end road.

      At the end of the road is a junk yard. From what I understand, the junk yard would cut the VINs out of them and send them to Toyota because of buy-back. They would transport the squished Tacomas in the dark because it wasn’t good for the brand.

      We’ll see if his opinion on cars and trucks changes any now that he’s in Tennessee. Probably not much. He’s getting up there in age. And Toyota still makes pretty good stuff, but there’s going to be more body problems than just the clear coat burning off.

      Reply
      • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

        My experience with Hyundais is that they like to save a buck where you aren’t looking… brake pedal switches, that sort of thing.

        With that said, the G90 has a particular mission in life: namely, as the transport of choice for South Korea’s upper crust and political class. It’s built in what Honda would call a “mother plant” to about the highest standards they can manage.

        Reply
        • AvatarJohn C.

          Couldn’t you say the same thing about the laughable Kia Amanti? Remember the South Korean upper crust are just the ones that stole the industry started for them under the Japanese occupation years. Given the relative industrial sophistication of the period Japanese compared to industrial leaders, it was hardly a strong foundation to build on.

          Reply
          • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

            The Amanti was a cheaped-out version of the third-gen Hyundai Grandeur, which was the firm’s first attempt to build a luxury sedan on its own. (Gen 1 and 2 were done through Hyundai’s partnership with Mitsubishi.)

            The Equus/G90 are larger and more complicated cars with a ground-up powertrain design. Having recently driven the W222 S-Class and most recent LS500, I’d say this car fits right between them in terms of size, ride quality, and general feeling of solidity. Certainly it’s more relaxing to drive than the new LS which feels more E-Class than S-Class.

      • Avatarjimlongx

        I don’t understand you term “buy-back”. What does Toyota accomplish by purchasing the VIN? Was there a possibility that the crushed body could be bought and Toyota could be forced into a refund?
        Thanks,

        Reply
        • Avatardejal

          They bought a ton of them back from the owners, models from the late 90s to 2003 or 2004. The frames were shot and it was cheaper to cut a check and have them squished somewhere to be taken off the road, but they ultimately wanted proof. They designated yards for making sure that what they bought back was what they paid money for. I guess it was easier with dealing with 1 place in an area instead of multiples. It was always Tacomas and it was a lot of them in the dark, most everyday. The yard they went to was basically in the woods on a dead end road.
          https://www.google.com/maps/@42.0775583,-72.7487945,309m/data=!3m1!1e3

          Would they really want dead Tacomas not squished being sent to this yard in broad day light?
          I remember seeing some with broken frames. Scary.
          Maybe they were arriving during the day time also, but I wasn’t around to see them.

          Reply
          • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

            Its worth noting that the Tacoma was no worse than the Truck aka Hilux in terms of rust and corrosion, but customer expectations changed dramatically during that time. It was common during the Eighties to see four-year-old Toyotas with completely perforated single wall beds. The oft-discussed invincibility of the Hilux was almost entirely limited to dry climates with no winter.

          • AvatarRonnie Schreiber

            The oft-discussed invincibility of the Hilux was almost entirely limited to dry climates with no winter.

            When was the last civil war or revolution where it was someplace cold, Russia maybe?

      • Avataryossarian

        toyota used box channel frames for awhile which were more rigid but trapped water and rusted. the problem wasn’t poor construction or cheap materials but a design flaw. i doubt that happens much on modern tacomas.

        Reply
        • Avatar-Nate

          Thanx Yossarian ;

          That’s what I dimly remembered too ~ I thought you could get new frame for them from Toyota .

          Failure to address rust is the easy and cheap way to ensure your vehicles won’t last no matter how good they are otherwise .

          I’m still tinkering on my little 2001 Ford Ranger trucklet and it’s chock full of really good engineering but the entire body was made of tin foil with zero rust proofing so they rust even here in Southern California .

          500,000 hard working miles in 5 years ? easy-peasy .

          Keep one on the road anywhere it snows or rains ? not so much sad to say .

          -Nate

          Reply
  15. Tom KlockauTom Klockau

    I drove a 2018 Chrysler 300 last week, a recent trade in at the Lincoln dealer. What really drew me was the color combination: ruby red with a white (yes, not off-white, not lite greige, but F-you no holds barred WHITE) leather, and black carpet and door panels. I liked it very much. But it was a plain 300, no sunroof, no V8, etc. But something to consider if a 300C comes across the transom in the near future. Owning two Lincolns had quelled my dersire to tear around. I just want something comfortable, quiet and NOT a combover…

    Reply
    • AvatarJohn C.

      I am glad you mentioned the 300. I get a little queasy about the foreign parts and the silliness of the hyper powered versions with the concomitant juvenile trim, but basic versions have a dignity that so many moderns lack.

      Reply
      • Avatardanio

        That’s the exact interior in my mother’s 300C Platinum. It’s nice in person and has worn well in the years, but you will have to clean and condition the white leather trim once in a while.

        Reply
        • AvatarMark

          Yep, I own a 2016 example with HEMI. Purchased “new” but at steep discount, since it had 9,000 miles on the odometer. Supposedly the dealer principal had driven it for a year.

          Pushing 75,000 miles now, and interior still looks great. Dark blue denim transfers dye to the “linen” (i.e., white) leather, but it’s easy enough to wipe off. (If the prospect of keeping indigo/linen clean is too daunting, the premium leather package also available in black/mocha and black/black. Would like to see the mocha in person.)

          No issues with the car in four years other than a temperamental window motor, which was replaced under warranty. Only regret is lack of Android Auto/Apple CarPlay, which debuted with Uconnect 4 in the 2017 model year. Apparently FCA has no plans to retrofit to earlier models as Ford and others have done.

          V8-equipped 300s are surprisingly scarce in New England, presumably because they are only available in RWD and everyone here thinks they need AWD.

          Reply
  16. AvatarPaul M.

    One must laugh at this Gen Xer worrying about his financial standing after a lifetime of wasting his earnings on you name it, Two VW Phaetons and bragging about them, green Audis custom ordered, Porsches, and such frivolous habits as buying expensive guitars, clothing, and watches. At some point, it all adds up.

    Still, a word of advise. It is not late. Down size, down size. Sell everything but essentials. That means no more racing cars. No more Porsches. No more Hondas and Trucks. Keep one truck/car and do everything to pay off your house.

    If you own you house and your car, you are the master of your own universe. With frugal living you can survive. College for the kid has to come out of loans he gets. Wife has to work. But you need home and car paid off and no more travel.

    Here is some words of wisdom for you from John Goodman again:

    Reply
    • AvatarJohn C.

      Why not combine the house and the car with a cat liter toilet equipped RV, preferably on the frame of Japanese shitbox pickup. He will eventually be thrown out of the driveways of his now new and older ex wives but that will free him completely to be master of his universe. The universe of the homeless camp. That way he won’t have to wait for that never day when he has 2 million and a bank that will pay him an interest rate over inflation. He might find his position f..ked up instead of the intended f… you

      Reply
    • Avataryossarian

      while we’re giving out advice, i’ll let you know the um total wisdom that i’ve accumulated: eat your veggies and floss your teeth. you’re welcome!

      Reply
  17. AvatarJohn C.

    There is a 20 billion dollar a year trade deficit with South Korea. A nation the USA sacraficed 58,000 war dead to ensure they would not have to submit to North Korea. A nation we still station army and air force troops in at great expense financially and personally to the troops there. Since the Genesis brand debuted and not including the cars sold under the Hyundai name the sales have been over 70,000 high margin cars and now CUVs. In this month’s C/D we see a write up by some woman extoling the virtues of the new Genesis CUV. The article was a full road test and talked up the mixed race singer who markets himself as John Legend and appears in ads. In the same issue we have the new Escalade, a short take with half the pictures.

    What we need is automotive journalists who do not just play along with this but instead tell the truth. If the 70,000 units had gone to the big three, how many of the recently dropped models would still exist? How many would have understood to make them more American instead of less so to attract buyers. America first just attracted 70,000,000+ votes. To bad it could not attract any auto journalist who would rather stand with C/D up and comer Annie White.

    Reply
    • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

      John Legend and his idiot wife are two good reasons NOT to buy a Genesis… but if you think Cadillac is competing directly with Genesis you’re nuts. The Escalade is almost twice as expensive as the normal trim GX80. And Cadillac has no proper full sized car to compete with the G90.

      Reply
      • AvatarJohn C.

        The Genesis CUV road test even had Counterpoints like the old road tests. They now call them dialogue. The first was good ole Rich Ceppos whose first line was the GV80 had me when I climbed aboard. It obviously had him when he heard he could drive it. He was the fellow back then who tested the 87 Town Car and photographed it in front of statues of dinosaurs. Do you think anyone pushed back at Ceppos all those years ago defecating on people or thought in this months issue somebody should offer an actual counterpoint to the anti American shilling? Neither do I.

        Meanwhile over at the Escalade short take, now called a rundown. The charming writer parked it in front of his neighborhood pot dispensary and the staff all walked off the job too oh and ah. More defecation. Don’t be a part of this type of thing Jack. If you like a foreign car say so, but also make sure you explain to your reader what if any are the American alternatives and how much we loose sending money their way.

        Reply
  18. AvatarRichJ

    So, Jack, thanks again for helping keep any sort of successful retirement strategy in check by reminding me why I need a Hellcat stat. Here is the conundrum, though. Thanks to one of your distant previous reviews, I own what appears to be a very rare Lexus RC-F, complete with the track pack, in stunning Infrared. It’s paid for. It’s fast, fun, and while it has mustang GT or better power, it’s got lexus levels of refinement inside (although I’m still not convinced the leather is really leather) and the torque vectoring differential seems to vector torque quite distinctly. It also has really nice fuzzy alcantara armrests that are ACTUALLY THE SAME HEIGHT, which is weird and unusual, but very pleasant as well as the little crumb catchers between the seats that you enjoyed in the Phaetons, I believe, and why doesn’t everything have those?

    Anyway, I’ve seen maybe 3 other RC-Fs since I bought this one in 2016, so it’s weirdly rare. Never seen another red one, and never seen another track pack (with the distinctive but probably useless carbon roof)

    That said, your argument is sound. What if there are no more hellcats soon? How will I exist with this punishing regret? Obviously, a choice must be made–keep the sexy, extravagant (paid for) lexus, which is astonishingly fast and a very capable driver in the mountains of north Georgia, or trade it in (probably for much less than it’s worth) for a product “that look(s) like (a) four-wheeled thug” and generates enough torque to alter the rotation of the earth slightly.

    Your thoughts on this dilemma would be greatly appreciated, sir.

    Reply
    • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

      In your shoes I would keep the RC-F, which is simply a non-trivially better car to operate everywhere but a dragstrip. I could see being tempted out of it by a Challenger Widebody stick shift, but if I already had a paid-off RC-F I would take it to the grave with me. Those are very special cars.

      Reply
  19. Avatarjc

    Well, as far as this supposed “loss of elasticity” – I think what it really is, is a realization of limited remaining time on earth and prioritizing what we want to spend it on.

    In my own case, I regard every minute I spend wrestling with poorly written recalcitrant software, when I’m not getting paid for it, as a minute of my limited remaining supply flushed down the toilet. Younger people who haven’t realized they too have limited minutes on earth deride me for my supposed “technophobia”. I point out, in vain, that I was programming (in machine code!) before they were even a gleam in the milkman’s eye. Nope, it’s not “technophobia” – it’s “pissing away my life trying to deal with someone else’s shoddy work-o-phobia”.

    As we get older we are able (some of us, some of the time) to see our activities in context and realize there are a lot of things that don’t need to be done. So I don’t spend any minutes of my time, for example, upgrading with each successive generation of smart phone. As long as I can afford to pay for it, I’m not doing oil changes, or putting a new roof on the house, or mowing the lawn (I am capable of doing all of these, but my time is better spent).

    Reply
    • AvatarJMcG

      When I turned fifty, I added up what time I might have remaining and realized that with luck, I had maybe 1500 Saturdays left.

      Reply
  20. Avatar-Nate

    1.13.2021

    Well ;

    Here we are only a bit more than a month later, over 4,000 covid-19 deaths _DAILY_ in America alone that’s more deaths in one year than was in the four years of WWII and more than died in the Korean “police action’ (war) and Vietnam but I’m sure there’s plenty of dolts who still says it’s a manufactured crisis .

    Hospitals are over full, they’re using the cafeteria and tents in the parking lots, ambulances got from E.R. to E.R. looking for openings and Americans die waiting, still that’s okay, right ? .

    My oldest friend survived it and is back to work, other family members have caught it and a shirt tail relative in Georgia died from it but you’re still okay so far so no big deal, right ? .

    SMH .

    More Americans should be forced to live elsewhere so they get a taste of the end results of what they’re trying to do to our country, the very bet one anywhere in the world or history .

    -Nate

    Reply
    • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

      Actually my 91 year old grandmother is dealing with it right now. So far successfully.

      I dont know how to say this, but a ten percent increase in the annual death rate isn’t worth destroying our country over. Which is what we are doing.

      Reply
  21. Avatar-Nate

    You’re dead wrong jack .

    Other countries took this more seriously and are coming out from under it, we’re going to be in a shitstorm for a while yet .

    -Nate

    Reply
    • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

      Is that so? How did they “take it more seriously” and what have their results been?

      In other news, how’s Florida doing compared to California?

      Reply
  22. Avatar-Nate

    It’s comical that you’re pretending to not know this jack ~ you’re the most tuned in person I know, you’ve just chosen to be disholest .

    They adapted the lockdown right away and are doing fine .

    You can check it out if you care about the truth .

    Florida is doing better than Southern California .

    You shouldn’t ask questions you already know the honest answers to .

    -Nate

    Reply
    • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

      I’m trying to lead you to the truth, which is that lockdowns and mask mandates have been utterly useless. All they have accomplished has been to shutter 100,000 small businesses so Amazon could post record gains.

      For better or worse, the number of deaths in a given area appears to be directly tied to the approximate amount of diversity in that area. This is true globally.

      Reply

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