Weekly Roundup: de Sade Edition

It’s New Used Luxury Car Month here at Riverside Green! No sooner does brother Bark take delivery of his pre-loved G80 than I have to one-up him with this very fine 1986 Mercury Grand Marquis LS Coupe! This Marquis will be doubly familiar to TTAC readers of yore: the Mehtas took delivery of it from an estate sale in 2010, just after I wrote the story of a misspent Summer of ’89 in my own 1980 Marquis Brougham Coupe.

After ten years of Sajeev’s care and improvements, the “MGM” runs fairly well, although it needs a dozen small fixes from power windows (they don’t) to fuel gauge (permanently on a pessimistic “E”) to transmission selector (which is one letter off… most of the time). Unlike Bark’s Thrifty-Six G80, the Grand Marquis has a full five (er, 4.9) liters of V-8 power, although said power is something like 42% of what the HTRAC Hyundai puts to the wheels.

Here’s the interesting part, however: after eleven years, I have finally found a car that genuinely piques my son’s interest.

We took the big black coupe-sedan…

SHORT DIGRESSION. This was marketed as a “coupe” but it’s obviously a two-door sedan, sharing a 114.3″ WB and approximate roofline with the four-door of the same generation. And yet… that’s the shortest wheelbase you could get with a Panther, same as a Mark VI coupe. So maybe it’s a coupe, right? Incidentally, a 1980 Continental (aka Town Car) Coupe had a 117.3″ wheelbase, same as the Town Car sedan and the Mark VI sedan. There was also a 120.7″ wheelbase P70 Crown Vic Taxi and M70 Marquis Taxi LWB, and a 123.7″ Town Car L. The Panther lifecycle was long and mysterious.

…to breakfast this morning, just me and my son. He immediately grasped the difference between the way cars were packaged in the Seventies and the way they are. “The seats are tiny… you sit all the way up… this part (pointing to the few inches of dashboard between the windshield and instrument panel) is way smaller… it’s like a small car, but it’s also like a truck, but it’s also like a big car.” After thirty-five years, the Mercury still rides better than anything short of a G90 Genesis. Certainly better than my Lincoln MKT.

John liked the smoothness of the car, the fact that at only five feet tall he could see everything around him, the square-edged dignity of the thing. As for me, I found it remarkably easy to get back into the swing of Panther-platform operation. I wouldn’t take my son or wife outside the neighborhood in it — these are not great cars for side impact protection — but I’d happily drive it across the country by myself.

After a half-hour spin through suburban Ohio we brought the Marquis back to the driveway, where once again the sheer long-and-low proportions of the thing served as a sharp contrast to the modern cars all around it. And yet the Panther itself was a stubby thing in its day. Say what you like about General Motors, they knew how to style a 215-inch car. The Marquis looks awkward and Baroque next to the model of elegance that is a 1980 Caprice Coupe or Delta 88 two-door, the same way a Town Car of that era looks ungainly next to the superbly drawn Cadillac de Ville.

Yet I still think the MGM handsome. For its razor-edged nose, for the majesty of its vinyl sail panels, for the (unpowered, this is not a Town Car Signature) vent windows. I like the way it goes down the road. I didn’t realize ahead of time that it would be a St. Thomas car, like my 2009 Townnie, instead of a Hazelwood build like my 1980 Brougham. 1986 was the only year of port-fuel-injected Marquis coupes and it was also the only year of Canadian assembly.

What to do with it? The Mehtas paid $2300 for it, put considerable effort, several parts, and a set of new Tiger Paws on its account, then sold it for me for three grand. Surely it will never be worth more than that. Yet I don’t dislike the idea of spending further money on the car. There are ridiculous ideas; twelve grand would get me a 450-horse 347 small block, a Monster Transmissions AOD, and the proper rear end to make it run. At that point it becomes a Mercury in the old-school mode, a street sleeper, but it’s no longer much of a Grand Marquis. Better, I think, to bring it all the way up to snuff, to as nearly emulate its 1986 condition as I can manage. To save it for sunny weekends, quiet moments, and those times when I would simply rather be… not somewhere else, but somewhen else.

* * *

From the pompous perch of luxury-Merc ownership, I chose this week to lecture on the subject of an increasingly feckless Cadillac.

59 Replies to “Weekly Roundup: de Sade Edition”

      • Avatarstingray65

        If you read it you would find out you are a racist, and if you don’t buy it you are also a racist, so why would anyone sane give Barry the money so he can buy another ocean front mansion by the “rising” sea?

        Reply
  1. AvatarRonnie Schreiber

    After thirty-five years, the Mercury still rides better than anything short of a G90 Genesis.

    The previous generation MGM rides even better. My father had a ’74, black with a dove gray interior, that was the proverbial living room on wheels. It was so good that I can’t imagine that the Continental of the day rode that much smoother. The earlier car also had better proportions than the ’80s iteration. Other than malaise era emissions control related driveability issues, the mid-’70s fullsize Mercurys were superb examples of the great American land yacht.

    Reply
    • Avatarstingray65

      I couldn’t find a link, but I remember the old SNL parody of the Mercury ads bragging about the smooth ride where a rabbi performed a bris in the backseat. The parody was of this ad.

      Reply
  2. AvatarJMcG

    Well, I’ll just pick a nit with your Hagerty column, which was both entertaining and educational. The B-29 program was plagued with problems, most having to do with overheating engines and the subsequent fires. Interestingly, the B-29 program was the war’s most costly, exceeding even the expense of the Manhattan Project.

    Reply
    • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

      It makes sense: if you have enough material on hand you could make Little Boy in a local machine shop and Fat Man any place that can make a pocket watch.

      Making a B29 is a far more complex operation.

      Reply
      • AvatarJMcG

        Absolutely. Enriching uranium and getting enough plutonium together were the choke points. If you’ve never read Richard Rhodes’ books on the A and H bomb programs, they’re worth your time.

        Reply
  3. AvatarDirty Dingus McGee

    ” 450-horse 347 small block, a Monster Transmissions AOD, and the proper rear end to make it run”

    Q ship for the win.

    Reply
  4. Avatarstingray65

    Good Cadillac essay, but I have to wonder how many dealers of many brands would take a buy-out these days rather than make “investments” in the EV future. None of the current EVs make a profit for the manufacturer (get back to me about Tesla when they make a profit without selling Carbon-Credits and without needing another round of investor cash), and it is hard to see profit from the dealer point of view. If EVs don’t make any money for the manufacturer, it seems pretty certain the dealer margin on them is also going to be little or nothing and that assumes they don’t need to be discounted heavily to move off the lot, which is not a safe assumption when I look at the deals to be had on Bolts and Audi eTrons. Perhaps they can make it up on volume, but outside of Tesla I don’t see any EVs that are very popular even when they are still eligible for federal and state purchase subsidies and commuter lane access, but I can’t help but wonder when states will start to look at the demographics of EV buyers and wonder why rich people should be getting new car subsidies and clog up the bus lanes with their expensive cars. Take away the EV government subsidies and EV sales (even Tesla) have cratered in every market around the world – does the dealer contemplating a major EV investment want to take a chance on that happening?

    EV resale value is terrible on all but the Teslas, so $399 month lease deals are unlikely unless they are subsidized by the manufacturer who is not making a profit on them, so there goes a major source of foot traffic into the dealer. EVs in theory need considerably less servicing than ICVs, so there goes a major source of dealer profit, but they will still need to invest heavily in EV training for their mechanics and parts people and invest in EV specific tools, equipment, and parts inventory. And why is EV resale value so bad? In part because the technology is moving fast so a 3 year old EV’s range and charging speed often looks pretty pathetic, but also because there is still major concerns about the ticking time bomb of expensive battery replacement, which means the used EV markets also brings major risks without much possibility for major profits.

    So consumers mostly don’t want EVs unless they are subsidized or Tesla, making and selling EVs currently isn’t profitable for anyone, and the EV profits from servicing and used cars sales is very likely minimal, so if EVs are the future then how many dealers will want to be part of it?

    Reply
    • AvatarNewbie Jeff

      Also… EV’s are appliances, not automobiles. I’m usually in the market for an automobile when I want an automobile.

      Reply
      • Avatarstingray65

        I guess you haven’t yet become a member of the Tesla cult. EVs can be fun to drive with the instant torque and low center of gravity, but I find it amazing what cult members are willing to overlook in order to “save the planet” or save money on gas. 1970s era Fiat or Chrysler would have been embarrassed if they had had Tesla build quality (i.e. thin uneven paint, terrible panel gaps, trim pieces and even glass panels that fly off). I also love that the suckers think they are saving the planet by getting “vegan leather” on their Tesla EV – which is nothing but vinyl made out of petroleum – the same stuff they put on base model economy cars. Heads up display, actual buttons for the climate control, radio, mirrors, seat adjustment – not available at any cost on a Tesla. And because there is no gasoline exploding in the cylinders under the hood, EVs usually skimp on the sound insulation so they actually are often noisier than conventional cars. And how breathless they are about being able to go from 10% to 80% of battery capacity in only 15 minutes at the fastest recharging stations – assuming no other car is recharging in the bay next to you and cutting recharging speed in half. Now Tesla customers get to pay $10K for the pleasure of being beta testers for full Auto-Pilot – what could possibly go wrong?

        Reply
        • AvatarNewbie Jeff

          “I guess you haven’t yet become a member of the Tesla cult…”

          Absolutely not. Some are ignorant, some are well-meaning, some (think they) are pragmatic… but the Tesl-ati are all insufferable. And it always seems to be the same type of person with zero passion for cars but a huge passion for image/political statement/virtue signaling… most have never so much as worn jeans to an HPDE but they go zero-to-Model S dragstrip videos in under 6 seconds…

          I don’t think words can adequately convey just how diametrically opposed I am to “enthusiasts” like this. I own 4 cars with 32 pistons and 120 valves between them (yes, the math works out… my Spec Iron race car is a 4.6 3V). I just ran two 8-hr enduros at COTA and took a green flag mid-pack with about 50 other cars at the same time. Nothing in the world sounds like a race start… the whole thing with Steve McQueen and “everything else is just waiting” then really starts to make sense.

          Yup, I’m a 40-yr old dinosaur. Yes, “they” will probably eventually win. But this one I’m just not going to give up on… at some point, life has to be about more than your carbon footprint or obedience to the global climate-rage class. F ’em

          Reply
  5. Avatartoly arutunoff

    gosh–a family that zips downhill they barely navigable terrain on bikes wouldn’t take this car on the road because of little side impact protection? the country’s been getting timid ever since, several decades ago, I heard a newscaster wish everyone a SAFE and happy Valentine’s Day

    Reply
    • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

      You should click the link in the story, perhaps it will change your mind. That was my 2009 Town Car. Not only was my wife nearly killed, in the sense that it took multiple surgeries to keep her from dying, the collapse of the frame actually killed my spleen, fractured my hip, fractured my right leg, and broke my back.

      Reply
  6. Avatartoly arutunoff

    godawful. a truck tore off my leg and I should’ve died 3 or 4 times. I still take the family out in my ’55 thunderbird; cross-country rallies in Europe, etc. we all have our justifiable foibles! be well!

    Reply
  7. AvatarLynnG

    Jack, great article on the Cadillac buy out. My good friend took the buy out after his family had had a stand alone Cadillac store for three generations and 86 years. He told me this fall that he goes to dealer meetings and litterally begs GM to ramp up Escalade production. Hiss team can sell everyone he gets but the powers at be are rationing Escalades because they want the dealers to sell (ATS,s – CT4.s, CTS’s – CT5’s) which he says are showroom dead weight. He says he has talked till he is blue in the face telling Detroit that BMW/Lexus customers do not even look at the Cadillac small sedans but knowone in Detroit cared. The $200,000 dollars (which is pocket change to GM) was the final straw. This is just one example but think about this, 30 years ago when his father was runing the store and he started at the dealership doing “make ready” he was preping over 200 Cadillacs a month for delivery. He told me over the last four of five years if they deliver 30 cars in a month it was a good month. GM is killing Cadillac dealers (locally owned business with local employees) thought complete incompetence (my word)….

    Reply
    • Avatarstingray65

      I imagine CAFE is the primary reason GM doesn’t ramp up Escalade production and the reason they are pushing electrics, and they will certainly get no breaks or relief on CAFE from the Biden administration.

      Reply
  8. AvatarAthos

    Sorry to be that guy… well, actually not, sorry. Nice car, but it’s B-Bodies for me. Period. A coupe would be a 77 Caprice. You can see out of them too :). You even lay the case in the article: The Marquis looks awkward and Baroque next to the model of elegance that is a 1980 Caprice Coupe or Delta 88 two-door

    Since Ford now has its own LS engine, how about this (even more) ridonculous idea to make it go: Godzilla crate + 6R80. The new 7.3 “starts” @ 420 ponies, toss some extractors and a cam, and the 6R will make for rancho relaxo freeway cruising.

    Dad had some Caprices when I grew up, I miss the smoothness of the ride. The US suspension tune was softer than the local one.

    Reply
    • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

      Couple reasons why I’m not driving a B-coupe (or more likely a C-coupe):

      I have a lot of personal history with Panthers. Owning them, driving them, selling them for a living, nearly getting killed in them.

      and… the supply of good Panther parts out there is tremendous compared to the GM stuff. The last of the 302 taxis just left service a couple of years ago. Take the bubbles away, which you kind of have to because they share very little, and the newest cars to use that GM platform and the parts would be the low production 1991 Brougham. So much stuff is NLA.

      Reply
  9. AvatarJohn C.

    Given that the port injected, but still quiet oriented 302, had more horsepower than the early run 351s, was this the fastest box panther? Of course American based car mags were too busy giving hand jobs to the Honda man. Nevertheless, my reference book says the 2 door weighed 40 pounds less than the 4 door and 330 pounds less than the C/D tested 87 Town Car that was 11.2 seconds to 60.

    Reply
  10. Avatar-Nate

    1986 huh ? .

    I ass-u-me it has a carby ? .

    Why not just de smog it and correct the late valve timing ? I’m sure that’d be cheaper and wake it right up .

    It looks like a nice car and God knows, Panthers, love ’em or not, are well sorted, good cars .

    I’d begin with the simple & cheap stuff like windows , fuel gauge and gear indicator as those are fiddly little things no one ever bothers to sort out, it’s normally just simple if time consuming, then the actual seat time gets so much more pleasurable you can begin thinking of polyurethane suspension bushings and Bilstein shocks, no need to do a motor / final drive swap .

    I’m a Chevrolet fanboi so I’d want the 1977 Impala Coupe but this is a nice car, you’re lucky to have gotten it .

    The Cadillac story is great .

    GM couldn’t dump water out of a boot with instructions in the sole .

    More’s the pity, they used to be great .

    -Nate

    Reply
      • Avatar-Nate

        Got it .

        I still think there’s simple ways to wake it up a bit without serious $ nor re engineering the car .

        I feel you about the collision worries, do you still ride ? .

        -Nate

        Reply
        • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

          Yeah I actually hit 175mph on the freeway last week on the ZX-14R.

          I don’t really care that much if I live or die but I’m no longer willing to endanger my child or wife if I can help it.

          Reply
          • Avatar-Nate

            Dig it .

            I lost my fear of death long ago, I just hope it isn’t protracted .

            The top speed isn’t really important, it’s how it drives in normal traffic that’s important .

            Tractable power is the key here, emission controls tend to sap it badly, simply disabling the EGR helps most vehicles but it can cause weirdness with the catalytic converter .

            -Nate

  11. Avatargtem

    Could wake up the 5.0 that’s in there on the cheap if you wanted to: junkyard explorer heads, headers/cam… no idea how the factory fuel injection setup would work with that but given the use of FI in 5.0 mustangs of that era, shouldn’t be too big of a problem. Some kind of shift kit in the trans and some 3.27 or 3.55 gears and you’d have a really fun street car.

    Really neat car. I’m jonesing to buy something similarly old to enjoy with my son, but with similar mental hang ups about crashworthiness. Never thought I’d be the guy that worries about that but here we are. I suppose as time goes on my ’06 Suburban will feel similarly “old school” to ride in and drive.

    Reply
    • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

      There’s a “LOPO TO HO” upgrade path that basically turns the engine into a 1986 GT 5.0 engine. Interestingly enough, the firing order changes when you do that, the HO 5.0 uses the same firing order as an LS1. Doesn’t cost a lot of money but takes some effort to get right.

      Another much-desired cheap upgrade: a V-8 from a 1996 Explorer, which is basically a Cobra 5.0 with an SUV cam… and then you swap the cam.

      Reply
      • AvatarJohn C.

        It is of course, your car, your choice. However there would be interesting historical aspects of the car lost to make just another hot rod. An overdrive fourth gear as tall and relaxed as a top gear on a modern 10 speed auto. An exhaust designed first, last, and in between to muffle all noise, even at the expense of optimum engine breathing. Keeping it original makes it a much better record of what was.

        Reply
        • Avatargtem

          I think there’s a reasonable middle ground of modernizing these choked/geared-to-death 70s-80s domestic V8s to make them much more enjoyable/satisfying to drive without going full noisy-hotrod or overdone “pro touring” mode (can’t stand the latter myself). Maybe even stick with (ported) cast manifolds and full quiet exhaust, stick with modest gearing (3.27?), etc. It’s a fun exercise to consider.

          Reply
        • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

          I agree! That being said, if I can get it to make 200 quiet horsepower instead of 150, I will have a little less hassle on short freeway entrance ramps and whatnot.

          It’s astounding how much faster traffic is now than when I was driving my 110hp variable-venturi 302 Marquis coupe in 1989.

          Reply
          • AvatarJohn C.

            You do make a good point about quiet horsepower. If this type 80s type of domestic V8 tuning had lasted, and I wish it had, the modern 302 equivalent would be way past 150 hp. How far, I don’t know. The best guess I think is the 5.3 Chevy truck small block but with a much more restrictive exhaust and a softer camshaft to get the horsepower lower in the rev range. 250 hp@3600 rpm? matching the 2.0 ubiquitous turbos but no lag and better manners. A CT6 like that wouldn’t have been chained to the showroom floor. Not sure how many Cadillac buyers could relate to Northstars or Blackwings

          • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

            Actually, GM now builds the PERFECT luxury-car V8: the new L8T 6.6 iron-block. More than 300 lb-ft at 1200rpm, up to 464 lb-ft at 4000. Stronger than a 1973 Cadillac 500 from idle to 3k and then MASSIVELY more powerful afterwards.

            Nothing’s stopping them from building it as an aluminum-block passenger-car engine with the same specs.

            That being said, the 6.2 I have in my Silverado, and which is standard equipment in the Escalade, is just fine. Yes, it’s high-strung and a little Corvette-ish… but if you didn’t know it could scream up to 6k you’d be perfectly happy letting it pull you around at 2k with more torque than a smogged 427.

          • AvatarCJinSD

            Use a 347 short block with your current heads, intake and exhaust. The only other change should be a modern low-restriction catalyst. Keep your intergalactic gearing because the increase in torque will pull it without breaking a sweat. Your engine speed ranges will remain the same, NVH should stay civil, and there is probably someone who knows if you need to increase fuel delivery beyond what the ECM will do on its own.

  12. AvatarDisinterested-Observer

    Clicking on the links reminded me of how much I enjoyed
    ‘Supernintendo of Schools (hopefully by now) Dan’s” comments. If you have his contact info and haven’t engaged in some bizarre feud with him you should invite him to comment on your site.

    Reply
    • AvatarDisinterested-Observer

      Ah shit. I used “hopefully” wrong. I hope that you are still in touch with Supernintendo Dan, and that he will comment on this site.

      Reply
      • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

        I don’t THINK we have any feud… I think he just wandered off!

        When I lose a high-traffic/high-value commenter, like “Tre Deuce”, I always worry a bit about that absence. Is it my fault? Or has something happened to them, as was the case when CG Hill stopped commenting here because he was in the final stages of the illness that took his life?

        Reply
  13. AvatarScottS

    Great posts from the Baruth brothers this week!

    “Oh, and for the last eight years the biggest Cadillac sedan hasn’t been available with a naturally-aspirated V-8”

    I truly would buy a Cadillac if they would drop the LT 6.2 in one. I can’t get my head around the fact that the ATS and the Camaro are basically the same platform and yet Cadillac refused to sell it with the 6.2. WTF?

    So, I’ve taken a cue from Mark and decided to look at used luxury cars. 13,000 mile B. Continental GT in virtually new condition, dealer serviced, for Camry money? I’m interested!

    Speaking of Ford/Lincoln/Mercury, my dad owned a Cougar, two Town Cars, and Two Mark VIIIs. I remember really liking the Mark VIIIs. Too bad they let that one die.

    Reply
    • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

      Keep in mind that the purchase price of a Continental GT is more of — and I know you know this phrase — a “transfer tax”.

      The true expense is in keeping it running. Many of the parts have a four figure wholesale cost. A few have a five figure wholesale cost. The day the infotainment screen goes blank, you just became eight or ten grand poorer.

      Reply
      • AvatarScottS

        Advice well taken from a twice Phaeton caretaker! At least it’s a transfer tax with a prospect of partial recovery after a couple of years of ownership.

        The Continental GT has something no current Cadillac has and that is unapologetic elegance, luxury, power, and presence. A woke electric Caddy is an apology for simply waking up and drawing a next breath. No thank you.

        Reply
  14. Avatarhank chinaski

    KICK IT WITH NAWS, YO! That trunk has room for TWO tanks!
    Re. ride quality, it has proper luxury car wheels and tires, not rubber bands around boat anchor wagon wheels. I just did the swap to the ‘Minus One’ winter shoes on the family truckster. Between the extra sidewall and loss in unsprung weight, the gains in NVH far outweigh any loss in steering response.

    The push for electrics in the same year that Kali was experiencing a threat of rolling blackouts is an odd one.

    Reply
  15. Avatar-Nate

    I guess you’re wedded to that top speed thing Jack ~ one easy way to go would be swap out the rear axle for one with a 3.90 ratio ~ it’d accelerate like a rocket, just wouldn’t like speeds over 90 .

    In So. Cal. I find 80 ~ 85 is my top speed, too many clueless boobs out there making sudden lane changes, running stop signs and red lights to go any faster and live .

    Even the L.A. Sheriffs have begun running the stop sign in front of my Sweet’s house…

    -Nate

    Reply
  16. AvatarShocktastic

    1986 me would have sneered at this car. 50 something me is jealous of such a fun time capsule. I’ve often wondered what your neighbors think of the wild menagerie of cars that haunt your driveway. Might make an interesting guest post or A cut & paste of a legal complaint.

    Reply
  17. AvatarDan S

    Jack,
    Congrats on getting back into panther ownership, the box 2 doors are a really cool body style on that platform.

    The lopo to hipo conversion is something unlikely to negatively effect the car’s character, from some of the older panthers I’ve been in and driven. Ditto the dual exhaust as long as you keep the factory mufflers. It wasn’t so much designed to suppress noise as be cheap. That second tailpipe might have cost an extra couple bucks.

    All that said, Jack will likely vehemently disagree with me on this, but my Disco 3 rides notably better than my old grand marquis ever did. The 4.4 AJ engine also reminds me of a mod motor, albiet one capable of breathing at high RPM.

    Last, I’d try finding whatever blinders get people past the panamera’s looks for use in driving a silverado HD. The L8T is somewhat lacking in the refined character one might want in one’s luxury car.

    Reply
    • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

      Ride is subjective, so I have no trouble believing you prefer your Rover to a Panther. My LR3 drive time is pretty limited; my dealership gave me one for a loaner the year they came out. My opinion at the time was that it wasn’t any better than my Disco 4.6, but that was sixteen years ago.

      I have about 80 miles of L8T drive time in a Silverado HD. The engine is plenty smooth; it’s the way they mount and insulate it in that vehicle, which is by design because HD buyers WANT TO KNOW AT ALL TIMES THEY ARE DRIVING AN HD, which is kinda funny.

      Reply
      • AvatarDan S

        200k mile durability requirements for the engine mounts certainly don’t help there either. Although that gets into the “reliability vs durability” discussion you’ve covered in the past, I think I’d rather deal with an engine mount replacement every 100k-150k, but I’m also very much not the target customer for an HD silverado.

        I’ve not driven the Disco 2, the air suspension is a common factor, but I’d think the solid axle setup on the D2 would give a bit more lively ride, especially on Michigan’s notoriously well maintained roads. Ohio driving is likely a different story, and my panther time was also could spring rear vs the rear air suspension, although I’m not sure how much of a difference that would make.

        Reply
  18. AvatarSobro

    You’re just now getting around to telling me the VW Phaeton was a not reasonable ownership proposition?

    HOW DARE YOU!

    Reply
  19. AvatarTom

    What I would do with the MGM:

    1. GT40P heads
    2. “RV” cam or suitable street equivalent
    3. Cobra intake manifold
    4. “shorty” stainless-steel headers
    5. bigger injectors and fuel pump
    6. megasquirt or equivalent FI computer

    Reply
    • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

      Steps 1-5 aren’t that much hassle; as the owner of an MS 2.0 powered Neon race car I can tell you that Step 6 is often a bitch. Not to make the thing run, but to make it run smoothly.

      Reply
      • AvatarStephen

        Stick with the Ford computer from a 5.0 Mustang. It can handle the moderate upgrades you are thinking of.

        I ran an AOD with a cheap shift kit in the Falcon for a while. The OD was nice, but I like a stick. Pulled it and installed a T5

        –Stephen

        Reply
  20. Avatarsgeffe

    Surprised that Sajeev hasn’t weighed-in on here about some of the suggestions for enhancing the car!

    Merry Christmas to Jack and Bark, and their families, and to this community!

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.