Weekly Roundup: Why The Maverick Is Cheap, And Why That’s A Good Idea Edition

I can’t lie; I’m excited about the new Ford Maverick, largely because I could save $1500 by spending $26,000. Let me explain. When I bought my Lincoln MKT, I didn’t really understand how heavily my son would end up focusing on riding dual-suspension mountain bikes, which don’t fit well on the traditional (and made-in-USA) Hollywood four-bike race I got for said Lincoln. So in the past year we’ve left the MKT at home and used my Silverado to haul the bikes.

This is using an A-10 to kill a housefly; all we really need is a vehicle that has enough open space in a bed to carry four MTBs with their front wheels over the tailgate, plus enough indoors space for (what will eventually be) two six-foot-plus riders and their gear. That’s what the Maverick is. It will get twice the fuel mileage of the Silverado. It won’t need nine quarts of synthetic oil for every change (thank you, GM L86!) or require massive 20″ tires. It will need a little bit of ground clearance to get up some trails.

The alternative would be to buy one of the heavy-duty USA-made DH bike racks for the MKT, probably Alta’s $1200 six-bike carrier, and that’s probably what I’ll do, at least for 2022. But I like the idea of adding a Maverick to the fleet. And why not? The price is right.

The reasons the price is right might surprise you; this isn’t information you’ll get anywhere else, at least right now.

My internal sources at Ford are telling me that the Maverick failed “pretty much every audit you can imagine, from fit-and-finish to FCPA”. The race to build a $19,995 truck meant that any number of “nice-to-haves” were left by the wayside. There was never any question of manufacturing it in the USA; at this price you get Hermosillo Assembly. But “the Fiesta was assembled there, and it wasn’t a piece of shit, like this is.”

What corners were cut? Probably not the powertrain, as the 2.5L hybrid is being used in higher-dollar cars elsewhere and Ford has demonstrated their ability to build everlasting hybrids via the Escape NYC taxi. Inside and out, however, look for cheaper materials assembled to wider tolerances. This will likely be a noisy little truck, filled with surfaces that will wear shiny in a hurry. The current Bronco Sport is already taking stick from the automotive press for interior quality and this Maverick won’t be any better. Could likely be worse.

What corners weren’t cut? Crash safety, the aforementioned engine, possibly the in-car electronics. We won’t know until we get a close-up look at production Mavericks. But the fact that there was allegedly an open conflict within the company regarding the Maverick’s quality should cause all of us to be cautious.

Don’t think that all of the above is a bad thing, because it isn’t. There has traditionally been a market for dirt-cheap vehicles that lasted long enough to pay off the loan without offering their owners much in the way of warm fuzzies or luxury pretensions. That market got wiped out by an odd feedback loop, going something like this: The government mandates more equipment. So the price of a new car goes up. So the manufacturer adds a few features to keep the car from looking like a showroom disaster. This brings the price up a little more. Which means that only wealthier buyers can participate. But those wealthier buyers want more features, more weight, more power. So you adjust accordingly. Which makes the car even more expensive, and exposes it to an ever pickier set of buyers… it’s the CIRRRRRRCLE OF LIIIIIIIIIIFE!

Most of the electronic trash they put on vehicles now (lane departure, that sort of thing) is now dirt-cheap. So the time is right to get back to a truly affordable vehicle. No, it won’t be a smaller F-150. If you want that, buy a Ranger, which is NOT dirt-cheap. This will be a plastic-feeling box on wheels that can accomplish a lot of tasks. We need more of those. Because we need more young people buying new cars. Because otherwise the market’s insane race to the top will have most of us fighting in the streets for a limited, and expensive, supply of used cars. Like we are now. But permanently.

Give the Maverick a sympathetic look when it comes out. Even if it’s kind of junky. Especially if it’s kind of junky. Right now, kind of junky is what we need.

* * *

This week, for Hagerty, I visited Uranus and rode a motorcycle that will pucker mine.

58 Replies to “Weekly Roundup: Why The Maverick Is Cheap, And Why That’s A Good Idea Edition”

  1. Adam 12

    Really think this is what the market needs. Do you feel like this is the Ranger/S-10 of the 2020’s?

    Looking for a smaller truck for weekend/occasional use is impossible anymore. Not since the Truck-o-luxobarges started being built. Will buy a truck like this for the utility.

    Reply
  2. Fred Lee

    I’m really intrigued about the Maverick and eager to see one. My main concern is, of course, bed length. A modern adult-sized mountain bike has a wheelbase of about 48″, or back of rear-wheel to front-hub of about 60″, give or take.

    It *probably* still fits with a tailgate pad, with an inch or two to spare, but it’s a tight squeeze. Definitely not enough room for four bikes and gear in the bed. Two bikes and gear should be OK. Probably won’t fit my 198cm skis in the back, even diagonally. And definitely not the 223cm red sleds. I suppose tailgate down with some straps to keep them in might work, but again not ideal.

    I’m also curious to see just how much interior comfort one gives up moving from a Lariat F-150 to a Lariat Maverick. Anecdotally the difference between an XLT F-150 and an XLT Transit was stark. But my F-150 is fantastic for road-trips, and the interior appointments are a big part of that (the long wheelbase and 18″ wheels is another big part of it).

    I’m thrilled to see Ford servicing this market. Still trying to figure out if it’s a market where I’d be a buyer, but the notion of stepping down from $60K MSRP 1/2-ton trucks (realistically $50K sale price) to $25K – $30K is appealing. I do wish they’d figured a way to get a 60″ bed, but I guess that means I should really be looking at a Ranger.

    Reply
    • Jack Baruth Post author

      I assure you I will be testing the Maverick with my XL Trek Session 9.9 as soon as I can. If that bike fits, everything will fit.

      Reply
      • Fred Lee

        Wow. Just checked. 129cm wheelbase on your Session. My Yeti SB5c is positively diminutive in comparison at 122cm. I look forward to your report!

        Reply
  3. Matthew Horgan

    My first thought was, “How is this a better choice than a used Frontier?”
    Then I checked used prices.
    LORDY.
    Will there 4.5 ft bed be short enough to quell the hordes of our cultural betters from doling out “irresponsible for hauling air” citations?

    Reply
    • Chairworthiness

      Have they gone up a lot recently? I was looking last fall and manual Pro-4Xs from ~2017 were in the mid to high teens. Not bad considering the comparable Maverick XLT with the 2.0T and AWD will be in the high 20s.

      Reply
      • gtem

        Prices for everything have gone bonkers. I too have researched used Frontiers on and off, a rare 6spd 4wd model in particular. Ever since Toyota neutered their Tacoma with the 3.5L, the Frontier and its lusty VQ40 has only gotten more attractive to my eyes. I test drove a new stick shift Xterra Pro-4X back in 2015 and thought it was great fun to unintentionally bark the tires going into 2nd from a light.

        Reply
    • Rj

      I think Ford will sell as many of these as they can make. In the ‘70s my dad bought a used Ford Courier, which I think was a rebadged Mazda. It was bone-simple, but the most versatile in-town vehicle my family ever owned.
      I have fond memories of Dad puttering around town in top gear, as he went from one of his rental properties to another with whatever tools he needed in the back.
      I understand the concern about diminished quality, but the main quality one needs is for the truck to start every time the driver gets behind the wheel. As long as the Maverick does that, it should sell.

      Reply
  4. stingray65

    Your Uranus essay is a nice contrast to this one. The Maverick sounds like a $20K vehicle with a $10K vehicle interior and general build quality where you are paying for the fancy hybrid drivetrain and all the required/expected safety features and the high demand body style, while Teslas are $50 to $100+K vehicles with interior and general build quality of cars that are half their price because you are paying for the “long-range” battery. YouTube is filled with videos of cross-country trips with titles such as “2000 miles in a Tesla” where the vlogger claims it is no trouble at all to take long trips in an EV and yet they are stopping every 129 miles to recharge for 23 minutes because it is always way faster to charge from 20 to 60% than from 5 to 100% which means they almost never use the theoretical maximum range during the trip. Just about every such video has some white knuckle moments when the range disappears faster than expected and they are crawling along the Interstate at 52 mph with the climate control turned off to extend the range while being blown around by airhorn blasting 18 wheelers going by at 75, or the recharging station they were depending does not exist or does not take their credit card or is otherwise not functioning and they need to spend 20 minutes making frantic phone calls to get help or pray they can crawl the 22 miles to the next closest recharging station and hope that one works. So at the end they find the 2000 miles takes 9 or 10 hours longer than in a conventional car and they save $5.49 cents in fuel costs – perhaps it makes a good video but not too many people want similar adventures or payoffs during their road trips. Of course you could always fly instead of drive cross-country – airport parking, security, masks, short-tempered flight attendants, no legroom, taxi/rental car on the other end, the extra $1200 for the “overweight” mountain bike baggage and tools, and the priceless satisfaction that comes in knowing you are saving the planet by owning a Tesla.

    Reply
    • CJinSD

      I don’t think the Escape Hybrid cost only twenty grand back when they were the NYC taxi of choice. I suspect that one motivation to take a chance on another developing-market car for the US is where Ford is on the CAFE death march. Even if Ford has to take a loss on these Mavericks, each one of them may make a highly profitable F150 or Navigator possible without an offsetting fine.

      Reply
      • stingray65

        I suspect you are correct CJ – although I suspect Ford is hoping most Maverick buyers will be enticed to the showroom by the low starting price but then decide to option up to $30K for only a few dollars per month more where they might start earning a small profit, or better yet upsell to a $35K Ranger or $45K F-150 where they make even more. On the other hand, pretty much every EV is a loss leader and Tesla doesn’t have anything profitable to upsell except carbon credits.

        Reply
    • Fred Lee

      10 years ago I test-drove the first generation Nissan Leaf. I don’t remember what the range was, maybe 70 miles if you kept the HVAC off? I also don’t remember what it cost, and frankly it doesn’t matter because my commute was 350 miles round-trip once/week, and the Leaf wasn’t going to cut it.

      A few years ago I bought a used Leaf, a 2015 with an optimistic 94 mile range. It was dirt cheap and it serviced my now 60 mile commute just fine. No, it’s not a road-trip vehicle. But it is simple, cheap, reliable transportation that requires virtually zero service. I mean, literally in the nearly three years and 20,000 miles I owned it, the only service it required was adding windshield wiper fluid.

      I now own a 150 mile Leaf which, likewise, has had no service (aside from some issues due to Nissan’s poor quality control) since March 2019.

      No, these are not road-trip vehicles. My rough approximation, for those of us not blessed with access to Tesla’s supercharger network, is that real-world “road-trip” range is (listed range * 80% – 25). Because you fast-charge to 80% and outside of urban areas it seems that every 50 miles is a realistic “worst case” for the next charger station, so you have to start looking with 50 miles range left and on average you’ll get to a charger after 25. So my 150 mile Leaf realistically goes about 95 miles per charge. The current crop of 250 mile EVs is closer to 175 miles between charges. Better, but a few weeks ago I did a long-weekend drive from Portland to Truckee and back in my F-150. Nonstop both ways. My record is 850 miles nonstop in my 38-gallon F-350 Diesel, back in 2001 or so.

      That said, while we see trickles of improvement in ICE cars and trucks, EVs are improving by leaps and bounds. The modern day equivalent of that 74-mile Leaf is the 250 mile Bolt EV. More than 3x the range in less than 3 years. Meanwhile charging infrastructure has improved dramatically (though I still very seldom charge anywhere but my garage). Charging speed likewise. The fastest cars and chargers now reach around 16 miles of range per minute, so maybe 15 minutes to hit the 80% mark before charging starts to throttle.

      So no, we are not yet at the point where an EV can supplant the range of an ICE vehicle. But we’re also not at the point where an ICE vehicle can rival the low maintenance or operating costs of an EV. Today they each have their benefits, but only one is improving quickly. It will be very interesting to see, in 10 years, what the landscape looks like.

      Reply
      • stingray65

        Fred – I agree an EV can be an excellent city car or short commute vehicle – they are generally fun to drive with the instant torque and cheap to run with the tax free “fuel” and low maintenance schedule. The only issue for an EV as a city car is whether they will ever be competitive with a gasoline city car without the various tax credits, commuter lane privileges, tax-free fuel, subsidized lease deals, and other perks that governments and manufacturers are offering EV buyers.

        I have my doubts that EVs will be great road trip vehicles anytime soon, however, because unless someone comes up with much lighter batteries it will become very difficult to put a larger capacity battery than the current top-line Model S/X or Mach E without vehicle weight becoming crazy heavy and packaging becoming an issue. Furthermore, larger batteries will require very long recharging times even with super-fast charging and I don’t think most road trippers are going to be satisfied with “only” 25 minute recharges to get 300-400 miles of real range, which becomes 150-200 miles of “real range” if towing a boat/trailer and/or in very cold weather.

        Reply
        • dejal

          I wonder if the US will ever see Hyundai’s 800 Volt charging. Sure sounds nice, and I bet it is nice. But I wouldn’t bet the farm that if I bought one there’s be an 800 volt charger within 200 miles of me. All the videos and stories tout it, but that’s because it’s there when they tested.

          Reply
  5. Widgetsltd

    As you know, I work for Subaru of America. Can you buy a made-in-USA new car for under $20k? Yes! A 2021 Impreza 5-speed Sedan has an MSRP of $19,720 including destination. An Impreza with CVT has an MSRP of $21,020 including destination. If you want the 5-door hatch, it’s about $500 more. And — Made in Lafayette, Indiana!

    Reply
    • Fred Lee

      I’m genuinely surprised — I didn’t realize one could still buy the Impreza sedan, and I didn’t realize you could still get a manual transmission in any Subaru.

      As a former Impreza hatchback CVT owner, I’m pleased to see this.

      Reply
      • Widgetsltd

        They still sell the manual 5-speed in certain models of the Impreza, and the 6-speed is available in certain models of the Crosstrek. Sadly, they no longer sell the Forester, Legacy or Outback with a stick. The WRX, STi and BRZ are very popular with a manual transmission, of course. The 6-speed is still the only available transmission on the STi – no automatic or CVT can be had.

        Reply
        • Fred Lee

          Yes you’re right, I completely forgot about those three, which is odd as I’ve owned one each of the STI, WRX, and BRZ in the last 10 years.

          We had a 2005 5-speed Outback XT back in the day, which was unfortunately totaled. And it’s a damn shame because that’s a car I’d have kept to my grave.

          Reply
        • John Van Stry

          The lack of a stick in the new foresters is why I still have my 2006 xt. I don’t like auto’s much, I like the CVT’s even less.

          Reply
    • Pete Zaitcev

      I looked at Crosstrek in 2019. It felt really good. The only problem for Texas was the short final drive (I tried the manual, of course). My better half wanted a GLC. We compromised by getting an X3.

      Reply
  6. stitt

    As always Jack your articles are well written and entertaining. That said, your EV commentary most closely resembles the output of the journosaurs you so effectively disarm in your writing. You state in the Uranus article that there are no Tesla superchargers on the road from Columbus, OH to the Gateway Arch and double down on it with an ‘according to the Tesla website.” It is apparent that you have some facility with internet attached computing so I find it difficult to believe that you aren’t aware that the statement was patently false, unless your planned route was some incongruous route along the bottom of Lake Erie. There are many chargers around each metro area and additionally at least four on I-70 between the two cities. After some brief research I was able to find that the trip from Columbus, OH to the arch would require two stops at superchargers along the way. One stop of 20 minutes and one of 30. Don’t be a journosaur of a different color when it comes to EVs Jack. It may not be beneath you, but it is definitely beneath the quality of your writing.

    Reply
    • stingray65

      So in other words only an extra hour would be required to take the Columbus to Arch trip + an $80K Tesla.

      Reply
      • CitationMan

        That’s an extra hour in a perfect world. I used to make 700 mile one day drives from Chicago to Western North Carolina, and many times traffic on the Interstates in sparsely populated areas came to a standstill for an hour or more due to construction or accidents. Good luck finding a flatbed to tow your dead Tesla to a charger.

        Reply
        • stitt

          I rounded up on those charge estimates but no matter. I’m sure you all cannonball every trip wherever you go but most of us aren’t counting seconds when we go on a trip especially with children. Traffic you say? No better vehicle in traffic than the Tesla as the car will handle the drudgery of stop and go traffic and the HVAC barely touches the battery. I mean hours of air conditioning will only consume a percent or two of the battery. Heat is less efficient on earlier cars but still nowhere near the draw of driving in the highway. The batteries on the long range Tesla can run your house for days. In addition to all that, you have no maintenance requirements outside of tires and washer fluid.

          Reply
          • Carmine

            The “don’t be a journosaur” comment from the guy humping Tesla so hard he needs to be hit with a spray bottle is kinda funny……

            I remember the last time I had to drive an hour and half out of the way to get 40 miles of range…..uh, never…..yup.

      • stitt

        I rounded up but traveling on autopilot at 75-80 mph, 50 minutes, probably less. While my Model S might cost more the Model 3 would be identical or less charge time for 50k. The cheaper Model 3 would also be able to do this easily but would require 1 hour and 10 minutes and cost 40k.

        Reply
    • Jack Baruth Post author

      You’re correct but things get a little harder when you look at the Bentonville trip. One supercharger between STL and Springfield.

      In my defense, I used an apparently obsolete list instead of the tesla map.

      Reply
  7. Jeff

    In the H2 SX article when you said “more on this later” I thought there might be a sidebar on how you can pick up 40-70 hp for less than 2k. Unheard of in the motorcycling world. That’s an entire FZ07! No word on reliability after that since almost no one has bought them.

    Reply
  8. MrFixit1599

    I drove a 2005 Escape Hybrid 350k as a work truck years ago. Remarkably reliable drivetrain. Needed service twice, once for a water pump, once for a bad cooling fan in the battery pack. Other than that, synthetic oil changes every 10k. I assume this is going to use the same basic drivetrain. Not fast, and getting used to the engine revving at 6k the entire time you had it floored to accelerate to highway speeds took some getting used to. Averaged 25mpg or so. Will be interesting to see if it can do what they claim.

    Reply
  9. silentsod

    I think a cheap truckish unibody will meet a lot of people’s actual use cases for owning a BoF truck (which are generally underutilized).

    The cheapness might get people into them unlike the much more expensive Ridgeline which is a similar idea at a bigger scale; and which someone elsewhere pointed out tops out at $50 grand or $13k over the loaded Maverick (IIRC from an article I scanned).

    Reply
  10. Fred Hughes-Hall

    This little rig is the spiritual son of the Explorer Sport-Trac! C’mon someone here remembers the Sport-Trac’s goofy “bed extender” !

    Reply
    • Jack Baruth Post author

      I’m not buying any more overseas racks. Velocirax is just a Chinese Alta. North Shores are just as expensive plus they ship from Canada.

      Reply
      • Jeffrey Crane

        Thanks for the reply! In retrospect, I shouldn’t have asked about Yakima (not made in the USA) and I was unaware the velocirax was made in China as well. I currently have the stairs mtr 2 bike and need to expand but don’t really want to pay the cost to make it a 4 bike rack and was thinking about the recon rack

        Reply
  11. John C.

    Gosh, imagine an American designed and assembled Maverick that was a two and four door with no cargo bed and simple suspension but a full menu of affordable powertrain options to provide for the modern American commuter. Surely Goldman Sachs and the People’s Liberation Army would sign on to be a part of that.

    Reply
  12. hank chinaski

    Poop jokes never get old. A road trip to celebrate you-know-who’s birthday? Very shameful.

    Even with a magic battery (and handwave into that charging time equivalent to a fill up) we still have the power generation and transmission problems. Every green tech ends in a smoke stack, and like everything else today, has been financialized (see also the recently blackballed ‘Planet of the Humans’).

    I suspect that the availability of Mavericks at that base price point will be similar to manual transmissions in general. A ‘What If’ for a modern spec Hilux would be an interesting exercise.

    Reply
  13. Mike

    I bet the plastics inside are ok, durable and reasonable to touch. Not everything has to be soft touch plastics especially if the vehicle is designed to be used robustly. Ford are to be commended for having a wide options set – so you can get the turbo engine on the base trim and nut be forced up to Lariat, or the sunroof on each spec level. I was surprised they have the same infotainment and Android auto/Apple CarPlay functionality on all three specs. Again could have used that to force people up the spec food chain.

    Reply
    • JMcG

      Is it really the case that different types of plastic vary in price? I just assume they put the lousy feeling/appearing stuff in the base models to encourage moving up a trim level or two.

      Reply
      • stingray65

        The soft touch plastics are coated with the “soft” stuff which involves some extra production processes and materials so that most certainly does cost more. Mercedes MB-tex plastic seats are well known for being very durable while I remember Ford Mavericks (and Torinos, Mustangs, Pintos) from the 1970s with vinyl seats that split and cracked after only 2-3 years of regular use, so I assume there must be some difference in the plastic quality and price that explain such differing durability.

        Reply
  14. Booty_Toucher

    Several weeks ago the Hyundai Santa Fe grabbed my attention as a possible future vehicle. When the maverick was announced at $20k with a reputable 40 mpg drivetrain, I thought the Santa Cruz was DOA. Then I remembered how much I hated every budget Ford I’ve had as a rental, and how much I’ve liked every Hyundai/Kia also rented. I also think the Maverick is super ugly both inside and out.

    I have a strong feeling that the Santa Cruz will be a more compelling vehicle once these are actually available. Probably a better value, too, even if the maverick can be had for less. Santa Cruz is also 5” shorter which makes a big difference for someone like me in a crowded suburb.

    Curious how others think they compare.

    Reply
  15. Compaq Deskpro

    Cars already have way too much quality and standard features, we are long overdue to cut back on them and lower the transaction prices. Can’t wait to see the Dodge Hornet pickup (Scamp?) response to this. Get it closer to 15K, I could care less about fondling the plastic dashboard.

    Reply
  16. Athos

    “My internal sources at Ford are telling me that the Maverick failed “pretty much every audit you can imagine, from fit-and-finish to FCPA”.”

    I’d go back to them and ask which build they are talking about. That will help you weight their statements better.

    Me thinks the $20K is a headline number to get people on the door. Most of these will likely sell for ~$25-30K and like hotcakes at that.

    Reply
  17. Daniel J

    This does seem interesting but I have a feeling I’ll like the Hyundai Santa Cruz far better,. especially if it can be had with the new 2.5t. I do like Ford’s 2.0T Ecoboost that we test drove in a 2020 escape.

    Reply
  18. Panzer

    Just replying to your comment about starting on Japanese bikes and then switching to Euro bikes as you climb the ladder being uniquely American – We do that here in New Zealand too, because we have a tiered motorcycle licensing system. Learners have to start on something legally restricted in power, so people tend towards the cheap and reliable. It’s the same in Australia and I think the UK as well.

    Reply
  19. gtem

    Loving the motorcycle features. Could you get your hands on a Z900RS perhaps? I’m very out of the loop on new bikes but I perked up when I learned of its existence. Love the throwback tank/paint, though I wish they did a more complete retro-izing like Honda did with the CB1100 (spoke wheels, chrome fenders, etc).

    Got a bit busy with things but I’ve got all the parts now to get my ’81 GS1100E on the road and riding. Somewhat amazingly, Suzuki still makes all the random rubber bits and pieces for it in Japan and my local dealership can get them in a week at very reasonable prices (carb to airbox boots, for example). I got her started a few weeks ago but saw I had major fuel leak issues at the petcock and gauge sending unit. I cannot wait to stretch this things’ legs. I’ve owned a ’78 GS1000C and a ’99 Bandit 1200S before this, this 16 valve GS1100 is the missing link between the two of those.

    Did a lovely two day tour with my bro through the PA Wilds on his pair of old 750 shaft drive Yamahas: the ’79 XS750F we just revived, as well as his warhorse, cross-country vet ’82 Seca 750. My first real tour/ride in years and boy was it great. Didn’t push it anywhere as much as we used to on the street, the risk/reward equation is different for me these days.

    Reply
  20. gtem

    On the Maverick: back when I had a ’94 Ranger I scooped up in the spring for summer landscaping/gardening duty (with intentions right off the bat to sell by the fall) I remember thinking aloud “hey it’d be great to have some kind of cheap FWD based version of this so I could use it year round.” I’d see the Fiat/Ram 700s and Fiesta-based fwd Ford trucklets down in rural Mexico when I was there for work and really wanted one. Now Ford makes it a reality and if I’m honest I’m scoffing at it. Of course it’s auto-only and very fat/bulky looking… to have expected any different would have been very naïve. For a DIYer like me whose not afraid to turn a wrench, these newer offerings will never stack up to the older (less safe) less compromised models with features that I want. Part of the fun of stick shift compact trucks is buzzing the engine as you bomb around town… you’re obviously not getting that part of the equation with a new Maverick. But I’m happy they’re bringing it here, Mexican-made and all.

    Reply
  21. VTNoah

    Put in my reservation for a Maverick the other day. Just finalizing my order now. It fits right into what our family needs / wants at the moment. Last March my company migrated us all to working from home so we dropped down to being a 1 car family to save some cash in case my job was impacted by the pandemic. My commuter at the time was a leased Volt which did it’s job but I never really liked it. In typical Chevy fashion, they sacrificed visibility to the alter of exterior styling. We eventually transferred the lease to an older gentleman who was over the moon with the car and we picked up a CPO XC90 for our family rig. Maverick is going to slot in nicely as my part time commuter, dump run / home depot rig, and snowboarding / mountain bike funmobile. I know the interior isn’t going to stack up to the Volvo but anything is better than the Volt. It was either the Maverick or a 5 year old Tacoma with 100k for the same price. I have a feeling it’s going to shake up the Medium sized truck market and we’ll see more rigs like it.

    Reply
  22. jc

    I suppose it only comes in crew-cab-with-almost-useless-bed-ette format?

    That rules it out for me. I need at least a 6 1/2 foot bed. In a compact truck, I could get by with a 6 foot bed. It’s a darn shame that no one wants to build a single cab 6 1/2 foot bed pickup. I am not convinced that no one would buy it, nor am I convinced it couldn’t make money, but I am probably just talking though my hat.

    Reply
    • jc

      Edit: that no one wants to build a single cab 6 1/2 foot bed COMPACT pickup.

      You can theoretically buy a single cab 6.5 foot or 8 foot bed full size pickup, and you can theoretically buy an extended cab 6.5 foot bed full size pickup, but there won’t be any on dealers’ lots and if you order from the factory there will be many, many delays. I spent most of the spring looking for an extended cab 6.5 foot bed full sizer (for pulling a trailer) and had to go out of state to find a used one. (Which is a very nice truck, and the dealer I bought it from actually did what they said they would do and didn’t pull any skanky nonsense on me – sooner or later there had to be one).

      Reply
  23. davis

    so they named it Maverick because the original was $1995.00 and was so cheap it had a shelf instead of a glovebox

    and it was dire – just a shortened wheelbase Falcon under the stylish body

    and it sold like like crazy – for a couple of years

    Reply

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