(Double) Weekly Roundup: A Sign Of The Times Edition

Rent will not be “cancelled”. It will be paid by the federal government printing money like a khat-gobbling Zimbabwean warlord and giving it to those landlords willing to accept 80 cents on the dollar after extensive paperwork. We are doing this while jobs go unfilled everywhere. Like at Firestone, where after two hours no one could be found to crank a wrench for $60 labor cost per tire.

That’s the situation in Van Nuys, but who cares if you don’t live there? Ah, you might care because all of California is simply a TV show about what will be common/popular/mandatory in flyover country someday. Maybe. Meanwhile in sunny Traverse City, Michigan, there is this: A sign begging people to treat Burger King workers with decency.

We should be doing that anyway. One of my co-workers, a woman who grew up dirt-poor in China and is fourteen years younger than I am but who now exceeds my career luminosity by the sort of calculable-but-incomprehensible amount that separates the mass of our local Sun from that of VV Cephei, says that I am overpolite to waitresses, fast-food counterpeople, supermarket checkers. “They probably think you’re making fun of them or something, you’re so formal about it.” Had to explain to her that the ghost of my father could appear at any moment to keelhaul me for being a mumbling, floor-staring eleven-year-old, and that therefore it’s necessary to have the precise correctness of Robert Crawley, 7th Earl of Grantham, while patiently repeating for the ninth time, to someone who could not possibly care less about the quality of their work: Ah, it is possible I neglected to mention the fact that I wanted this cheeseburger plain, would you be willing to shoulder the burden of correcting this situation which I am certain is my fault, having made my previous eight requests on the subject in a manner that simply wasn’t a good “culture fit” for you, or was simply too quiet to penetrate the Future-und-Weeknd audio curtain laid in by the $299 iPods you wear at work?

Can’t help it. I’ve worked too many dishwater-dull, dishwasher-poor jobs myself to have any natural high-handedness when it comes to service-industry workers. In this, I am apparently rare. And the mechanism by which Burger King rage is engendered should teach us a bit about the way we live now.

What is the core of empathy? Why, it’s the simple realization that you share a common humanity with the person facing you. Our ancestors weren’t always very good at this; read an unvarnished history of any war, from the siege of Troy to the worst excesses of the Civil War or Vietnam, and that will be made plain. Yet we’ve now managed to divide ourselves along more lines than ever before. We’ve never been so willing to immediately unperson someone. The brouhaha over the mRNA treatments for COVID-19 is proof positive of this. Rolling Stone ran a 100% fabricated story about how decent vaccinated people couldn’t get treatment at hospitals because all the beds were being used for Trumptards recovering from poisonous doses of “horse paste” aka ivermectin. Meanwhile, TheHill.com warned people that ivermectin-related calls to the Washington Poison Center had TRIPLED this year.

Well, there were eight calls so far this year, so last year there were… 2.7?

The RollingStone story was so poorly researched and so entirely fabricated that it wouldn’t have made the cut anywhere that does a single fact check… but nobody wanted to check the story out, because it was so deeply satisfying. It neatly divides people into “science followers” and subhumans. It’s entertaining to watch subhumans poison themselves with horse paste, because they aren’t really people. They don’t even shop at Whole Foods. No empathy required, or even possible.

Similarly, claims that VAERS that shows over 7,000 deaths from the COVID-19 vaccine don’t always get full context. VAERS is a plain-Jane database that doesn’t require full proof that a vaccine caused a death. If you get the COVID-19 vaccine then fall down the stairs the next day, that could make it into VAERS, much the same way that a lot of morbidly obsese and deathy ill people who tested positive for COVID-19 at the time of their death were retconned into “COVID deaths” because Medicare pays 20% extra for COVID-related deaths and there is a government program to reimburse hospitals for uninsured COVID cases on their rolls.

The “vaxxed” and the “unvaxxed” are now two separate groups who not-so-subtly cheer each fabricated report of TRUMP VOTER CRIES ON DEATHBED, SAYS HE WISHES HE’D BEEN VACCINATED or BOOSTER SHOT CAUSES HEAD TO EXPLODE IN CVS PHARMACY, PEOPLE KEEP SHOPPING REGARDLESS. The ACLU is now assuring us that vaccine mandates help guarantee civil liberties, a position that directly contradicts their 2008 stance on the matter. What’s changed between now and then? Why, nothing — except that the Uniparty wants a vaccine for everyone now, and the ACLU is no more likely to protect people from the Uniparty than Turning Point USA would be interested in keeping 120,000 Afghans from arriving in small-town America ASAP.

As divisions go, however, the GeneTherapy Vs. HorsePaste fight has nothing on the real division happening in America right now: between the Zoom-Eloi and the Physical-Morlocks. For the Zoom-Eloi, the pandemic has taken them out of the offices and into their living rooms, from which they attend meetings and enjoy a full suite of delivery services: Amazon Prime, Uber, Doordash, Seamless, et al. Yes, there are emotional side effects of this, and several Uniparty organs such as The Atlantic devote a tremendous amount of ink to them, but in reality most of us would give up a little social interaction if it meant we didn’t drive two hours each day to pay an hours’ wage just for parking.

The Physical-Morlocks have no such option. You can’t run a Burger King over Zoom. You gotta show up. Well, maybe you don’t want to. If you’re not paying rent right now, why would you go to work? For the first time since the Industrial Revolution got started, we’ve come up with a legitimate excuse for people to stay at home indefinitely, and we’re paying some of them to do it. Let me tell you this, as someone who worked a lot of hours at Wendy’s: if the government had offered to cover even half of my Wendy’s pay while I did not, in fact, go to Wendy’s, I’d have jumped on that deal.

The so-called “Fight For Fifteen” has been largely won across the country: most fast-food jobs start at twelve bucks an hour or more, with some paying seventeen-plus. But most people would rather just stay home and watch Netflix. Can’t blame them.

Meanwhile, your Zoom-Eloi are all stressed out from having their face on corporate display nine hours a day, so when they get to Burger King and the service isn’t immediate, they apparently lose their minds. Which further demotivates the Burger King workers, which causes some of them to quit their jobs, which in turn reduces quality of service, and so on.

(Side note: You cannot convince me that video conferencing is not largely a tool to enforce the meek compliance of the modern Outer Party. The purpose of video conferencing is to let people stare at you without retribution. This is deeply humiliating to our monkey hindbrains; as we permit it, we become meeker and more compliant, the same way that Mike Cernovich’s “gorilla walking” apparently increases free testosterone. Your body knows what’s happening, even if you don’t.)

I don’t have the answers to any of these problems, except: If you’re vaxxed, try to see the point of view of the unvaxxed, and vice versa. Don’t take out your Zoom frustration on the people who are making you a meal. Don’t automatically hate the people who have “fake remote jobs”. Be excellent to each other, is what I’m saying. We’re all human beings, even if we don’t always realize it.

* * *

For Hagerty, I wrote about an alt-universe miniature Aston, considered the impact of the Toyota Harrier, and said goodbye to an old friend.

122 Replies to “(Double) Weekly Roundup: A Sign Of The Times Edition”

  1. NoID

    Maybe I’m slow, but I think the Turning Point USA hypothetical was opposite of what you intended. Unless you’re making a point-within-a-point that the average Turning Point clickbait-devouring troglodyte is generally anti-refugee, while Turning Point USA itself is probably quite interested in bringing people over who actually want to live freely, and will therefore embrace our classic western values (ideally in a rather Cuban-American fashion). At least that’s the bill of goods Charlie Kirk just sold me in “The MAGA Doctrine”.

    Anyways, the whole horse-meds thing has absolutely driven me to seething anger at our news media, as well as the general inclination to talk about things DOUBLING or TRIPLING or OMG TEN TIMES WORSE THAN EVER, because the raw numbers are actually low, and only “concerning” in reference to the even lower baseline.

    At this point I check CNN every morning only to see what the shrills are crying about this morning. This is literally what I mumble to myself every time I check. I can’t imagine how exhausting living like this must be for these people.

    Reply
    • gtem

      Turning Point USA fundamentally represents Koch Bros style “bring in cheap labor” interests, no matter how they might try to throw some of the Trump populist coat of paint on the exterior. Charlie Kirk is a complete moron btw, and has, along with all the other young hip Republicans of his ilk, taken his special little trip to Israel. It’s creepy.

      Reply
      • Daniel J

        I am not a fan of Charlie Kirk.

        But the old GOP better take notice of the young conservatives out there. They want more and more of an “activist” role out of conservatives. I’m not saying this is wrong or right, but they will not stand for the the “do nothing” republicans we currently have.

        What’s wrong with “populism’? For me, the term populism is too broad of a term. There are populists lefties out there and populist righties out there. I hate the term populist or populism.

        Reply
        • gtem

          These new people are literally just youthful activists FOR the “do nothing” (read: sell the country out and turn it into a third world airport/ global commerce center) Repubs. Oh and keep the billions flowing to our “greatest ally.”

          Reply
          • Daniel J

            That’s not what I’m seeing at all. I have not seen any of the TP stuff, but I have seen some of the YAF stuff, and what I’ve seen:

            – get out of wars (This even goes against some of Crenshaw’s beliefs)
            – Government actively push conservative agenda’s, especially one’s that are from some moral authority ( anti libertarian )
            – They are not necessarily for small government, but for government that actively protects rights
            – Close borders
            – ban abortion at the federal level ( many do nothing conservatives say it’s a state’s rights issue)
            – ban gay marriage ( many do nothing conservatives believe it’s a states rights issue )

            What I see from do nothing conservatives is relegating rights to the states, which is more constitutional accurate. These young republicans in essence want to purge the more liberal and libertarian ranks and use the federal government as a cudgel just as the democrats have.

        • John C.

          Look what happened to Nick Fuentes. When he spoke out against Turning Point Con Inc. copypasta and how it ignored the concerns of the college Republican with the constant blather about racial and sexual orientation diversity magic at the direct expense of the Christian Conservative young men who are trying to start families and careers, the Hebrew cancel hammer came out for him. Gone from Jewish Facebook and Utube, and even Chinese Dlive and tick tock. Our Zog government then froze his bank account and put him on the no fly list. He now drives around the country in a Challenger and tries to host pop up WBS/America First meetings before Zog and Antifa actually kill him. Bravery

          A lot of you get mad when I point out such things are a secular Jewish conspiracy, but we gave up a lot when we gave that tiny minority such power over us. It was why so many of us were thrilled when the Taliban pushed aside our stooges in Kabul. Seeing those secular homosexuals run for the airport, incapable of fighting for Blinkin, Malala, and gender equity makes you wonder what the last days of the deep state swamp will look like in DC. El Al jets lined up on the tarmac headed for Tel Aviv with a similar line of Chinese jets at Dulles with Tucker in the White House? Fantasy of course as we become a shrinking minority, but the inability/illegality to stand up for ourselves will not serve us well.

          Reply
          • Ronnie Schreiber

            John,
            “Conspiracy”? Conspiracies involve conscious cooperation. If there’s a Jewish conspiracy, I’m about as Jewy as they come so how come I haven’t been notified of the weekly meetings where I get my guidance on how to manipulate 110 IQ, B+ goyim like yourself? Where’s my weekly check for my part of the Jewish conspiracy?

            Jew haters like you are welcome to boycott anything and everything that Jews have had either invented or had a major role in developing. Of course, you’re too much of a weak coward to give up the modern world.

            If it hadn’t have been for the Scots and the Jews, you’d likely be living at the same standards as your ancestors in the 16th century, but then you claim to like how the good old days were. One fourth of children died before adulthood but at least those pushy Jews knew their place and didn’t make your nepotistic clan actually, you know, compete.

            If you’d like to actually learn something, instead of intellectually masturbating, I recommend Dov Fischer’s series on understading American Jews at the American Spectator.

            https://spectator.org/part-10-rabbi-dov-fischers-definitive-year-5782-10-part-guide-for-understanding-jews/

          • John C.

            I don’t hate Jews at all but that does not mean I think it was a good idea to allow a tiny minority such social, financial, and political power over the majority. History shows that allowing it to happen did not work out well for the Spain of Queen Isabella II, the Hungarian, Bavarian or Slovakian Soviet Republic, the Germany of Weimar or Stalin’s Russia. It is pretty obvious it is not working well today in the Ukraine.

            I don’t doubt that you and the vast majority of Jewry are not invited to the meetings. But if a conspiracy is 80% Jewish in a two percent and shrinking Jewish country, to not notice would take the wearing of super size blinders.

            You always notice especially the achievements of Jewry in business, the arts, and innovation as you should. The next step is when you see Jews leading you off the cliff in old stereotype ways. you police it internally within your community. Remember Admiral Donitz wanted to be the one to hang the Nazi war criminals under the German military code, to keep the matter internal. He was not wrong.

          • Ronnie Schreiber

            As expected, you wont read Dov Fischer’s series as it might disabuse you of your treasured beliefs.

            https://spectator.org/part-10-rabbi-dov-fischers-definitive-year-5782-10-part-guide-for-understanding-jews/

            As for my policing the Jewish community, I’ve been at odds with most of the Jewish establishment since the 1960s. It has acted in counterproductive ways that are too numerous to catalog here. Suffice it to say that if they were trying to design a system meant to make Jews not Jewish, they couldn’t have done a better job. That’s why Rabbi Fischer says that about 1/3 of those who identify as Jews are not Jewish by any reasonable standard, and about 2/3 of the rest are complete ignoramuses when it comes to Judaism, Jewish culture, and Jewish history.

            George Soros is an apostate Jew who rejects the Jewish religion and affliation with the Jewish people. He’d dearly love for my orthodox Jewish neighbors and family members to disappear as they embarrass him deeply. The same with Ben & Jerry and all those that your fevered brain imagines as being part of a conspiracy. Yet you want to say they are “Jewish” and blame all Jews for their actions.

          • John C.

            Any mention of that fellow with the initials GS is considered anti Semitic by the Anti Defamation League, a well funded arm of the Israeli government whether left or right. As is Trump surviving the second impeachment, Tucker being still on tv after mentioning unfavorably population replacement in the USA, or if you go back a bit Pat Buchanan listing the names of Wall Street investment partnerships. Your good Rabbi is quick to generically condemn the spirit of the conspirators but is nowhere man in policing them. It is much better for him to do it then some right wing Christian after riding into DC Taliban style.

            You have more freedom of speech than me but it would be nice if you did not casually throw around smears like Jew hater. I will agree to Jewish conspiracy disapprover. On a similar note, I read your otherwise good article on the recently deceased car dealer. It would also been nice if you hadn’t casually thrown around the charge that he couldn’t get hired by GM after attending Kettering University. Preposterous! Why would they have let him in the GM University if Jews weren’t welcome?. Does it perhaps sound more right that he thought he could make more money selling even if that was more stereotypical and less prestigious than engineering. Nah…. GM bad. Lazy Ronnie.

          • newusername

            John C – You have all the right in the world to be angry at the fake jews that are hurting all of us. But please make the distinction – in my opinion it’s not fair to lump the good actual Jewish people I know and love with those jerks. If you keep doing it, you’re doing the work of the jerks.

          • John C.

            Please notice that in my original comment I referred to secular Jewish conspiracies. Given that I was surprised by Ronnie’s pushback that included no acknowledgement or regret as to what happened to Nick Fuentes or others cancelled. If you disagree with someone, debate, ignore or even declare them in the wrong, don’t cancel.

  2. stingray65

    Slow Joe tells us the unvaxed might infect the vaxed, which is why everyone is going to be forced to be vaxed except Post Office employees, member of Congress and their staff, and of course illegals entering the country infected. Joe is angry about all the Trumptards who refuse to take the Jab that 1 year ago he and his fellow Democrats were telling us was dangerous because anything developed under Trump’s watch couldn’t possibly be safe and effective. Funny thing is, the groups that are least likely to be vaxed are blacks (90+% Democrat voters), PhDs (99% Democrat voters), government employees (99% Democrat voters), and illegals (99% Democrat voters), so as usual the Party of Science, compassion, and “My Body My Choice” is least likely to follow the science as they call the other side stubborn, ignorant and hope they all die.

    Reply
  3. Disinterested-Observer

    When I was in college there was still some of the hangover of the notion of “welfare queens.” While my professor did not go so far as to question where the “men” were, if I am not mistaken their role is still required, he did point out that not working was neither moral or immoral, it was a financial decision that was rational.

    Reply
    • Jack Baruth Post author

      I think my brother wrote extensively about it last year. Most of my thoughts on the subject would probably offend some or possibly all of my readers.

      Reply
      • Lh

        All the more reason to express them. This is a comment section full of grown men who should be able to bear a little intellectual discomfort

        Reply
      • Disinterested-Observer

        A couple of years after I said something on a nationwide call-in show that shook the host. Unfortunately what I was advocating did not come to pass, and what has is ten times worse.

        Reply
      • Harry

        I’ll take an opposite tack to other responders to this comment. You have a lot of diverse opinions, and so do the readers here so I don’t know which thoughts you have and which readers it will offend.

        Personally, I think people need to start just keeping their Sept 11th thoughts to themselves, all of them. That should have started around 5 o’clock that evening when Schumer started weaseling in front of cameras and trying to make speeches like he was Winston Churchill.

        I was in the Navy at the time, although I was sleeping late at home when the planes hit, The street I grew up on has a memorial sign from the passing of my neighbor in the towers. I didn’t know him well. My Dad was NYPD and went back for a few months after the attacks to help make up numbers. I have plenty of stories from friend’s families about how they were late to work that day ect. and how they survived. That doesn’t give me any special perspective on it, it is just my background.

        I kinda sorta forgot today’s date when I woke up this morning despite the articles and news stories I saw yesterday, and I don’t think round # anniversiries are special. I had no idea where there was a firetruck taking up half the parking spots on the block in my small Idaho town when I was trying to buy milk. There were about 5 people in the town square listening to the volunteer FD read off the names of the FF who died. It was sad and meant less than nothing. I wish they wouldn’t. It might just be me but at times I feel like it is less of a memorial and more trying to bask in reflected glory.

        It was a surprise attack, not a battle. There was bravery and heroes and death and sacrifice. There is nothing to learn except what we all knew about ourselves beforehand.

        How we should respond, how we should improve our security, preserve our liberties, fight terror, what to build…

        That is worth talking about.

        Now, years later, how we should have done all of those things, and how we can do better, is worth talking about.

        What people think about that day? Keep it to yourselves.

        Reply
        • stingray65

          All I can say about 9/11 is that all the politicians who are attending memorial services for the fallen first responders who also advocate defunding the police should rot in hell.

          Reply
        • Daniel J

          @Harry,

          I think especially in the current times, there is something to learn about bravery and sacrifice. Ordinary people making extreme sacrifice and the action of real leadership are becoming rarer and rarer these days. While it meant less than nothing to you, it means the world for many people knowing who made sacrifices.

          Reply
  4. Kevin Spencer

    Jack, I love your writing. This may seem a silly thing to post as a comment, but I’m being honest and excellent.

    Reply
  5. Dirty Dingus McGee

    ” while patiently repeating for the ninth time, to someone who could not possibly care less about the quality of their work”

    You have far more patience than I. Case in point; Last Thursday I was in Sidney OH for a meeting. As I had time before my meeting I decided to go to a Bob Evans for breakfast. It was past the normal breakfast rush so it wasn’t packed. Placed my order for a particular omelet that includes tomato and asked that they hold the tomato. 10 minutes or so out comes my order, yup it has tomato’s. Get the waitress, ask for it to be re-done. 10 more minutes here comes the waitress. Now it has no cheese, but still has tomato’s. I asked the waitress to charge me for the coffee only as I was NOT going to have a 3rd one made. The manager was apologetic, explained that it was hard, even in a small town, to get decent help. I can sympathize as our company is struggling to find quality help also. But in the end, the work has to be done and done CORRECTLY. I don’t know what the answer is other than work or starve.

    Reply
    • Scott

      I’m somewhat lucky I’m not a picky eater at all and don’t have any food allergies. As long as they brought me any omelet, id go with it but I understand the frustration of getting the wrong order multiple times. I’m a bit less accommodating at fancy places. If im going to drop over $100 for food, i want it to be right.

      Reply
      • Dirty Dingus McGee

        I’m not a particularly picky eater, but due to diverticulosis I have watch for items that have seeds. Which sucks because I like tomato’s.

        That being said, it doesn’t matter if I’m spending $10 or $100, I would like to have what I ordered. Typically the higher price establishments have better quality help, so less mistakes. I haven’t had my order wrong at Ruth Chris’s, but “casual dining” is a crap shoot. As far as fast food, when I used to go it was more likely to be wrong than right.

        Reply
    • stingray65

      What do you expect when the government pays people more to stay home than they would earn after taxes by going to work? Every service business is running understaffed with people who are stressed out, not fully trained, or rusty from not working for many months. Worker shortages also mean the best workers who are willing to work have better job options than ever before, so the less attractive jobs attract less competent and less service minded employees. Vaccine mandates are only going to prolong these problems.

      Reply
      • Dirty Dingus McGee

        “What do you expect”

        I’ll go with the last words of my original comment; work or starve.

        It used to be that to qualify for unemployment benefits, you had to ACTIVELY search for work. Documented by signed paperwork from potential employers. If you turned down a legitimate offer, no more benefits. I guess that went by the wayside in favor of free money for all.

        Reply
  6. John Van Stry

    I have always tried to be polite to people, especially after one day at work, many decades ago, where my frank assessment of somebody’s work skills and perform ended up with them leaving the room in tears. While I wasn’t punished for that, (because I think everyone felt the same way, I was just the guy who SAID it), I realized that I didn’t gain anything by that, in fact, I probably lost.
    So I make a concerted effort to always be polite. Now, having grown up in NY and lived in NYC, if you want to get rude, trust me, I will throw down in a heartbeat and you’ll never know what hit you.
    On the other hand, I’ve been living in Texas for a while now and I -love- how damn near everybody always tries to be polite. Makes me smile. I don’t know if it’s a Southern Hospitality thing, or that everyone is armed, but it makes life so much nicer when everyone is trying to be considerate (maybe in the major cities here it’s different, but out in the country it’s great).

    As for the Vax thing:
    Doesn’t anyone wonder why if this Vax is so great, we have to keep from exposing the vaxxed people to possible exposure?
    And why the government is trying to FORCE you to take it?
    Can’t seem to recall any other vaccine where they had to threaten to take away your job, your ability to buy food, or even your right to go out in public, can you?
    But hey, people are sheep and mainly stupid, so it’s not like they’re going to think for themselves. I caught the latest strain from a vaxxed friend at a weekly dinner, so if anything, I think it’s the vaxxed we need to be protected from!
    Also, I’ve now got natural immunity, how come no one wants to recognize that? It’s always been superior to a vaccine. Why do they still want me to get the jab?

    And last of all:
    If the CDC changing the DEFINITION of the word VACCINE doesn’t clue you in to the fact that something isn’t right here, well, if it turns out this vaccine really does kill everyone two years from now, like all the ‘weirdos’ claim. I’m gonna be laughing my ass off as I starve to death.

    Reply
    • John Van Stry

      Oh, and I took ivomectin to cure my Covid.
      Why?
      I went to the ER (I have perm lung damage) as I was having trouble breathing the Covid was causing my lungs to fill with fluid and had given me pneumonia.
      What did the people at the ER do?
      Bill me $1200 dollars and SENT ME HOME. No treatment.
      So I took the stuff I use on my animals and lo and behold! The covid went away!! and that allowed my lungs to start draining.
      People seem to ‘forget’ (let’s face it, they’re idiots and believe whatever the box with pictures tells them to believe) that Ivomec is also a broad spectrum anti-viral, among other things. Been using it on animals for 3 decades now.

      Reply
      • NoID

        That’s what I’ve learned just in treating my pets and chickens. There’s a huge amount of overlap in the medical treatment of humans and animals, including the medicines we use. Humans are just another “animal” after all, right?

        Reply
        • Ronnie Schreiber

          I keep a jar of “Fish Mox Forte”, i.e. 500 mg Amoxicilin tablets packaged for fish hobbyists, for when I have some kind of bacterial infection.

          Pharmaceuticals are pharmaceuticals. While there are companies that specialize in veterinary drugs, amoxicilin is amoxicilin and veterinary drugs are made to the same purity standards as those used in human medicine, and often come off the same manufacturing lines.

          Reply
          • Daniel J

            If in a pinch, I’ll use Amoxicillin for treatment of certain infections, and in the past, I have used those from the fish store, as I used to have fish that needed it on occasion. The largest concern here is that taking too much Amoxicillin can mean that certain bacteria will become resistant to it.

            I’ve also in the past have had Silver Nitrate on hand that was used for cats and dogs. Its the same stuff a doc in a box will use if a wound isn’t healing properly.

          • Cdotson

            “veterinary drugs are made to the same purity standards as those used in human medicine”

            This isn’t 100% precisely true. I have no direct knowledge about the formulation of pharmaceuticals themselves, but I have been occasionally designing manufacturing equipment for pharmaceutical and medical device manufacturing industry for a few years. Recently I worked on a veterinary device machine and while similar, the requirements were quire a bit more relaxed. The companies doing FDA (human drugs/devices/food) production are absolutely anal-retentive about cleanability and machinery-caused particulate generation and the materials that are allowed to touch their products. The veterinary guys stuck with the material choices (heavy on stainless and inert plastic, nothing that rusts) but didn’t care nearly as much about generated dusts/dirt and how it might be introduced to the product.

            That said for occasional use I wouldn’t worry about it and wouldn’t hesitate to take an animal drug. You’re not going to get heavy metal toxicity from a few weeks’ worth of dirty animal meds.

      • MD Streeter

        It’s not like ivermectin is for animals only. The FDA approved it for use in us for certain conditions. I get why certain people are sneering at those who take “horse paste” but I also think they’re mouth breathing idiots.

        Reply
    • Scott

      I don’t particularly want the vaccine to kill everyone considering most of my family is vaxxed but I’d be lying if i didnt have some smug satisfaction when the overly pro vaccination “theres no reason not to take this and this pandemic is all antivaxxers fault!” Have horrible side effects from their vaccine. There’s risks. People should weigh them. Giving the vaccine to under 18s should be medical malpractice. Anecdotally the amount of healthy people dropping dead at thirty “for no reason” seems high to me and no one will even touch if it’s the vax thats doing it

      Reply
      • stingray65

        Just saw a report today that finds teenage boys have a 6 times higher risk of serious health problem from the vaccine as they have from getting Covid. I suspect the same to a lesser degree is true for anyone healthy under 60.

        Reply
        • CJinSD

          Killing boys is a feature for most Democrats. There seem to be a remarkable number of dead teenage male athletes in central Virginia for it not to be at all newsworthy.

          Reply
          • Ark-med

            Except for the inconvenient fact that killing boys would negatively affect the number of trans athletes available to win women’s wrestling championships that democrats would get to celebrate.

  7. goose

    There was that US consortium of doctors who were testing and having success with ivermectin vs covid, so what is going on now?

    Are people guzzling the stuff with no regard to dosage?

    Reply
    • Eric L.

      No, hence Jack writing about it. An aged ER doctor in Oklahoma made some bold, completely inaccurate statements, about gunshot victims having to wait outside in ambulances because there’s no room for them in the hospital. Too many CovIDers, you know. Separately, he said he was treating Ivermectin overdoses. “The worst was the guy who went blind.”

      Only, er, it’s total and complete nonsense. One of the hospitals he named issued a PR statement: Dr. So-and-so hasn’t worked for us in over 3 months. We have plenty of beds, no gunshot victims are waiting outside. Also, we haven’t treated anyone for Ivermectin overdoses.

      But the mass media continually reports on the drug as if it’s only for animals, and hasn’t been used in humans for decades. It’s on the WHO’s list of essential medicines, alongside gems such as immodium (Loperamide), ibuprofen, morphine, etc.

      Reply
      • stingray65

        Correction Eric – “the FAKE media continually makes FAKE reports on the drug as if it’s only for animals,”

        The same FAKE media that doesn’t report on the senility of Biden, Hunter’s laptop, the billions in weapon’s left in Afghanistan by senile Biden, and in fact hasn’t honestly reported any news story since at least 2016.

        Reply
        • Eric L.

          I left insertion of those adjectives as an exercise for the reader. Unfortunately, Sting A Ray, the media is very real and their propaganda’s damage is equally existent.

          Reply
    • Bon Ivermectin

      @goose:
      FLCCC is the biggest Ivermectin group; Ivermectin is only one of several medications that are used:
      https://covid19criticalcare.com/new-i-mask-faqs/

      Another excellent resource is Swiss Policy Research
      https://swprs.org/severe-covid-a-post-viral-autoimmune-attack/
      “…most covid trials studied only a single drug at a time, basically looking for a “wonder drug”, whereas in many viral and autoimmune diseases, multiple drugs have to be applied to achieve optimal results. In the case of covid, it is obvious that one should try to inhibit viral replication as well as the hyperinflammatory, autoimmune and prothrombotic response. Indeed, this is what most early treatment protocols try to achieve. Once the damage is done, it is often too late to treat.”
      https://swprs.org/on-the-treatment-of-covid-19/
      https://swprs.org/the-ivermectin-debate/
      “Large and expensive RCTs may, however, come with their own intricacies. Specifically, RCTs may to some extent be “designed to succeed” – as was the case with some covid vaccine trials as well as remdesivir – or be “designed to fail”. In the case of covid – a multi-phasic disease with a very steep age-based risk gradient – a trial can be designed to fail by enrolling (young) low-risk participants, using a drug late instead of early, under-dosing the drug or in some cases even over-dosing it.

      For instance, the ongoing TOGETHER trial of ivermectin, sponsored by the Gates Foundation, was caught using just a single dose of ivermectin, whereas successful trials used two to four doses per day for up to five days. The Oxford PRINCIPLE trial, meanwhile, was caught enrolling participants up to 15 days after symptom onset, at which point some high-risk covid patients are already dead. Of note, the Oxford group had previously “botched” several other early treatment trials.”

      Robert Malone seems to be involved with a trial of famotidine + celecoxib and has said that a trial called Quantum Leap “insisted on adding dex & remdesivir to all patient groups. They were warned not to do this, & had read our preprint. It is why I resigned from the study. Our research shows adding these extra drugs significantly decreases efficacy & causes death.”
      https://twitter.com/RWMaloneMD
      https://twitter.com/RWMaloneMD/status/1433804837670490127
      https://twitter.com/RWMaloneMD/status/1433800963626766353

      Effectiveness of a multidrug therapy consisting of Ivermectin, Azithromycin, Montelukast, and Acetylsalicylic acid to prevent hospitalization and death among ambulatory COVID-19 cases in Tlaxcala, Mexico
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7872854/
      Patients treated…had a 75% and 81% lower risk of being hospitalized or death, respectively, than the comparison group.

      Finally, although “everybody knows” that smart people take vaccines and only stupid conspiracy theorists think of medications, Pfizer is finding its vaccines are so successful that it is working on a protease inhibitor for COVID-19;
      https://cdn.pfizer.com/pfizercom/2021-09/First_Participant_Dosed_in_Phase_2_3.pdf
      the Phase 3 (final) trial results should be available in late February:
      https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04960202

      Reply
  8. MrFixit1599

    I was at a customer a few weeks ago working on a machine in Iowa. At the end of Tuesday we all agreed we would meet back the next day at 8am to continue the runoff and testing. Operator showed up at 10:30. Evidently this is normal. The supervisor that wants to fire him can’t, because they can’t find anyone to replace him.

    Reply
  9. MikeO

    Jack, was just at the Delamar in Traverse City. I want to say that I was amazed by the service and thought, wow they are one of the lucky ones to have enough staff to do it. Well after a couple of cocktails at the bar and conversation with the staff I was informed, in fact that they are shorthanded like everyone else. I was amazed by the positive attitude of everyone, even after they told me how hard they have been working to take care of all the guests. I made sure I left an extra big tip and would recommend that everyone do the same. Not just at the nice restaurants but at all the fast food places and even the convenient stores. Nothing makes me happier at the local Burger King then seeing the face of the person at the window when I hand them cash and say keep the change, and tell them I appreciate what your doing!

    Reply
    • stingray65

      From my experience and your example, I suspect that service levels are still respectable in areas of the country that are heavily white (or white Asian or white Hispanic) where the service workers are therefore mostly white and/or Republican leaning. In other words, where people are still taught and value a work ethic and cordial customer relations, and where most of the customers are not Leftist jerks.

      Reply
  10. yossarian

    Well at least you can go inside a restaurant. My family can’t because my jackass mayor demands that i inject my 15 yo daughter with an experimental vaxine to gain entrance. At least the weather was nice yesterday and we had a delicious lunch al fresco at wu’s wonton king on east broadway.

    The mask is the left’s maga hat.

    Reply
    • stingray65

      Given how racist most MAGA hat wearers are in blaming China for the Wuhan flu, it is mighty open minded of you to take your family to a Chinese restaurant.

      Reply
      • yossarian

        i assume you are being sarcastic but in case you are not… chinese americans are americans and many of them are the most ardent anti-communists in our country. and for the record, i have never worn a maga hat and i only where a mask when it is required by law or the posted rules of a private business.

        Reply
  11. Newbie Jeff

    “If you’re vaxxed, try to see the point of view of the unvaxxed, and vice versa. Don’t take out your Zoom frustration on the people who are making you a meal. Don’t automatically hate the people who have “fake remote jobs”. Be excellent to each other, is what I’m saying”

    But at what point are the significant ideological, cultural, and political divisions so incapacitating to a functional society that covering it up with a facade of forced politeness is itself contributing to the dysfunction? I’m not saying to yell at service employees… but I am saying it’s hard to affirm the humanity of my “fellow citizens” who destroyed my society and outright reject my own humanity.

    How do we coexist with people who eagerly support self-destructive politics (“defund the police!”), censorship (“this tweet is no longer available because the user has been banned for violating our terms of service”), and the outright subjugation of other American citizens (“burn, loot and murder all you want for the righteous progressive cause, but if you insult the feelings of Nancy Pelosi’s desk you’re going to federal prison”)? Anyone think the fake Rolling Stone article was just the latest aberration that went beyond the pale? They’re just getting warmed up… the American Progressive movement has won, they are in total control, it’s their country now, and they want us to SUFFER.

    At what point do sane, coherent people come to the conclusion that our society has failed? Broken beyond repair? That unity is now impossible? I find myself agreeable to – even comforted by – things I would have never entertained just a couple of years ago. I suppose it could be up for debate, but I’m pretty sure it’s not me who went insane… and I’m also pretty sure that the “Outer Party” zombies infected with progressive authoritarian classism would neither appreciate nor reciprocate my politeness.

    Reply
    • stingray65

      “the American Progressive movement has won, they are in total control, it’s their country now, and they want us to SUFFER.”

      You are correct in many ways, but not in the most important way that matters. Look at the maps of the Trump presidential votes in 2016 and 2020 and see how almost the entire geographic country voted for Trump. Almost all the Biden voters are concentrated in big cities and cemeteries, which means they don’t control the food they eat, or the electricity and gasoline that powers their homes, offices, and vehicles. Even in dark blue NYC – did you see how the fire fighters and police cheered Trump yesterday and were scrambling to have selfies taken with him? I suspect that in most big cities the people who actually make things work in terms of keeping the lights and water on, repairing roads and bridges, and hauling in food and hauling away the garbage are mostly on the political Right, while the bankers, professors, teachers, DIE administrators, tax collectors, social justice activists, non-profit sector administrators, and social workers who could drop dead tomorrow and the world would continue to run pretty much unaffected are the Biden voters. So what does that mean? Hint: remember how big city people were freaking out about toilet paper shortages last year – think how they will act when the lights go out and the food shelves are empty – those gender study and MFA degrees won’t be of much help.

      Reply
      • Newbie Jeff

        It’s a gratifying thought… that all those city vermin living in squalor would one day realize just how desperately their urban utopia is dependent upon the conservative working class…

        …but is that really true? The American Left has preeminent political power across government, bureaucratic, corporate, and non-profit sectors. Considering the recent performance of our military, I’d say the American Left has secured that sector, too. I’m not sure urban “leadership” could get any worse in major US cities, but it hasn’t seemed to change voting habits… so either the urban working class is hopelessly loyal to the Democratic Party or they’re forever outnumbered…

        I’m conservative working class and my company didn’t waste a moment to force me to vaccinate or else they’ll make my life miserable. Not too much later the government removed any threat of liability by basically dictating the exact same policy to all employers with 100+ employees (true fact: the employee-initiated litigation effort came to a standstill the next day). And as Jack noted, I don’t think the ACLU’s in our corner… yup, I’d say they have the upper hand.

        If there really is leverage, when are we going to deploy it? If we’re waiting to see just how far down the totalitarian rabbit hole we’re going before “rising up”, I’m not sure that strategy makes sense. I’ll do my part… my company WILL lose a trained professional if they force me to choose between vaccination and my career. But I’m not so sure they’ll cry about it…

        Reply
        • stingray65

          The yellow jacket protests in France, the freedom protests in many countries around the world, the trucker and farmer protests in several parts of the world, the “f-ck Biden” chants at college football and professional baseball games, and even the Jan. 6 Capital protests over the stolen elections are indicators that citizens who actually work for a living are nearing the end of their patience with corrupt and idiotic “leadership” we have. I also don’t believe any armed forces that actually do the shooting will obey idiots like Biden, Austin and Milley to round up “deplorables” in their own country, and are much more likely to turn their weapons on the order givers.

          Reply
    • yossarian

      new york is dark blue as stingray noted but only because the blue are the biggest bullies. you can see the subtle rejection of the narrative everywhere here. just tune into wabc am77 on the internet, if you want to know what many here actually think. i travel on the subway overnight for my job and mask compliance at night is about 50% including cops and mta. as some one i know whose brother in fdny put it, after you spend the first months of the pandemic putting people in body bags without catching covid, it seem ridiculous to take a vaccine developed in a rush by the people who caused the problem. we’re not all stupid.

      Reply
  12. hank chinaski

    Every kid should work in food service for at least a summer….flipping burgers, busboy, whatever.

    I had a brief conversation with a doc who runs a smallish local ER: “So, the news says you guys are swamped with really sick non vaxxed.
    Oh, most definitely. It’s awful.
    So, where are they going?
    Oh, we send them home.
    On oxygen, then?
    Nope.
    Uh, ok”

    They are going to kill kids with this jab, mark my words. 12 and up for public school in CA is just the beginning. Pfizer’s vaxx delivery contract with Albania leaked, and is likely their boilerplate for everywhere else. Worth a read and everything you’d expect.

    Rolling Stone? Credible? Fact checking? Guffaw! See also: Ederly’s fabricated UVA rape story.

    The whole thing is a big FU to the deplorables. Biden’s recent speech is glaring incitement, praying, goading some poor desperate fool to do something violent, or else prepping the stage for when their entrapped patsies fulfils one of their own fabricated plots. Then it’s camps. Aussie style.

    Reply
    • Ice Age

      “The whole thing is a big FU to the deplorables. Biden’s recent speech is glaring incitement, praying, goading some poor desperate fool to do something violent, or else prepping the stage for when their entrapped patsies fulfils one of their own fabricated plots. Then it’s camps. Aussie style.”

      So, if we let them provoke us, they win? But if we do nothing, they win anyway?

      Oh well, nothing we can do about it then, except feel terribly, terribly sad. I sure hope somebody ELSE does something about it. But not me – I can’t. I have a mortgage and a car payment, and I need my health insurance. I can’t afford to make waves.

      You understand…

      Reply
      • hank chinaski

        It’s seemingly ages since Taibbi wrote for them. Substack is probably his best bet, as with his former Intercept colleague Greenwald.

        One clever wag suggested a Polska Solidarity approach: always be the sand in the gears rather inciting a rolling of the tanks. In a way, the government is helping that along with the mandates, shutdowns and paying folk not to work.
        If there is hope, it lies with the proles. Or the Minaj’s, heh.

        Reply
        • Jack Baruth Post author

          That’s why the Eloi have the immigration throttle cranked past the safety wire: they know this will happen and they expect to have a subservient infrastructure of permanently lower-class people in place by the time everyone wises up.

          Reply
          • hank chinaski

            This can’t work. Ignoring that a large proportion of the immigrants are coming just to eat/shit/fuck on the dole, there are only so many very low skill jobs to go around. Sure the tables may get bussed and the lawns mowed, but you’ll get 3rd world levels of infrastructure maintenance…..running the (green, lol) power grid, unloading cargo containers, switching the trains, keeping airplanes and buildings up and the potable water and sewage separate, run the hospitals, etc.
            The eloi, who of course hate us and don’t care, will be able to insulate themselves from the filth, casual violence and endemic corruption of such a place in their parallel systems for only so long before IRA and cartel methods of dealing with recalcitrant officials become the norm. The irreversible damage will have been done of course. The model that they think they are following may work on a nation of Han, but not of one populated like Brazil.

  13. Danio

    Apparently as of the 22nd, they’ll be requiring the Vax passport to attend public events, travel on airlines and eat in restaurants up here in Ontario. While I got the shot, I won’t partake in any such system. I don’t need the virtue or villainy. I don’t even talk about it aside from close friends because no matter what your status is some jackass wants to shout at you about it. Nor do I need any smug bullshit about “doing my part”.

    This whole situation is fucked and I want out.

    Reply
      • danio

        “Are any of the Canadian political parties not run by Covid freaked Karen?”

        There is one, the People’s Party of Canada who are running sort of a populist-libertarian mix sort of platform. They’re managing to garner pretty significant support in the range of 10-15% depending on the polls.

        The old guard Progressive Conservative Party has basically went full lefty and onboaded themselves with softer language versions of the currently in power Liberal government platforms. It will be one of those parties that forms the next government, so basically nothing about the current trajectory will change.

        Reply
    • dejal

      I have been Vax’d up. I don’t care if you have or haven’t (to the point of being a Jack Ass to you) and I won’t hold it against anyone whatever stance they take, as long as they respect that I took my stance. It made sense for me and my circumstances. Your mileage may vary. My circumstances is being diagnosed with prostate cancer in March and “Active Monitoring”. Which means a PSA Test every 6 months and another MRI in Feb 22 (PSA # jumped a bit last week). With the possiblity of a MRI/Ultrasound needle biopsy after (they overlay the MIR over an ultasound image and then take in my case 21 needle samples). I’m hanging around medical facilities too much in the last year.

      If this stuff kills me, so be it. I have a chance of being in a box in less than 10 years with the cancer (average life expectancy). If I get 15 then I hit the average life expectancy in the US anyways.

      It not taking it, kills you, so be it.

      I’m not “grateful”.

      I haven’t had to show my status to anyone yet, and I think I’d walk away if I did.
      Masks don’t bother me, but I concede that masks are just a bit better than no masks at all, to the point that masks don’t do all that much.

      Reply
      • stingray65

        Sorry to hear about your diagnosis and wish you the best in your treatment. Sounds like you have made sound decisions with regards to vaccination.

        Reply
        • dejal

          Thanks. It’s relatively easy to shrug this off right now. It is a slow growing thing and it was caught really early. I’ve checked out health sites about prostate cancer and found one guy who’s been Active Monitoring since 2011. Geez. Plays with your mind though. You get all worked up for the results and then down the road have to get all worked up for the next test. Nowadays, according to the Doc., surgery or radiation is 6 of one, half a dozen of the other as far as outcomes. At least my doctor is going about this as a quality of life thing. “Why do anything when it may never get bad enough to kill you?”

          I have decided what hell is though. Wearing a mask for COVID while being in the MRI machine for 45 minutes. The first time, I went in, and said “TAKE ME OUT!!!”. After I got my wits around me, I gutted it out and went in. There can’t be any metal near the machine in the room, but they were pumping moving air at my feet, coming from outside. Didn’t do much for my masked face. When I was done, I sat on the curb next to my car in the parking lot for 15-20 minutes.

          Reply
          • Jack Baruth Post author

            I’ve always heard that “nobody dies from prostate cancer” but the quality of life effects can be miserable.

  14. Mike

    Regarding the wait staff- I recently stopped for breakfast at a favorite little country cafe in my town. Waitress took my order, and proceeded to quietly refill my coffee cup anytime it got under 12 full as I awaited my food. When my omelette arrived, she apologized that the chef had put the sausage on the side, instead of in the omelette as I’d ordered it, and offered to have it remade. In about 1/2 a second I realized I could simply take a bite of sausage with every bite of omelette, and my Christian upbringing made me feel guilty about wasting a perfectly good plate of food, so I told her not to worry, and thanked her for the food. She continued to keep my joe topped off, and I left her a 30% tip.

    Regarding virtual meetings- very soon after our work went mostly virtual last year, I started shutting my camera off. Or I’d turn it on, with a piece of tape over it, and a background screen displaying something work related. We’re now at the point where it’s odd for anyone to have their face showing on the screen, save maybe the primary presenter, and even then only if there’s no spreadsheet or presentation they’re speaking to. I don’t think anyone really likes video conferencing; it seems unnatural.

    Reply
  15. Will

    You can always turn your camera off when on a zoom call, which I usually do now. But it’s shit interaction. I have been on several interviews that have only used zoom and have failed at all of them. Maybe I also just suck at interviewing. Could be a combination of both. There is something missing in the personal interaction that even an introvert like me sometimes excels with or can show off my intellectual side. I dunno, but I do know it’s not how we’re supposed to communicate with each other.

    I saw a woman speaking during some panel show where she kept referring to rights as “privileges” and that they are just that. This country has become way too comfortable, easy, and wealthy to have that opinion, but wtf do I know. The most accurate character that was written was Daenerys, they’d rather burn it all down just to rule over ash. The world is in a scary place, but where do you even move to? If the US falls, kiss “rights and liberties” goodbye.

    Reply
      • Ryan

        Remote work is great because it highlights incompetence and rewards those of us who are successful at their jobs. The people who would normally spend all day at the coffee bar or in frivolous meetings are quickly outed for not being able to produce anything tangible Those of us who can produce are rewarded with the fact that we no longer have to “look busy” to appease others.

        I can perhaps see the need for in-person work in limited instances, but it’s a pretty outdated concept and the past 18 or so months have proven that.

        Reply
    • James L Martin

      I told my daughters that no matter how great a guy seemed, you could truly judge his character by how he treated waitstaff. If he treated them poorly, he’ll eventually treat you poorly. This rule works 100% of the time.

      Reply
  16. Daniel J

    As we have moved into this era of “unvaxxed’ vs “vaxxed”, I suppose I’ll throw my 2 pennies in.

    1. Firstly, I just don’t understand the logic of the vaccinated having a coronary over the unvaccinated. It’s simply a matter of personal choice.

    2. Now of course the argument is now about filling up hospitals, and that the unvaccinated could cause a vaccinated person not to get treatment The fundamental flaw in this logic is there are so many preventable things individuals can do to keep themselves out of the hospital, Covid in the grand scheme of things is just one in a long list. We have never mandated any measures to reduce health problems to keep people out of the hospitals.

    3. Then there is the argument of preventing unvaccinated kids from getting sick. This argument is unhinged, as 18 and under are 10x more likely to die from car accidents and 20x more likely to die from drowning than Covid. It’s also been shown in Israel that the vaccine isn’t really preventing the spread.

    4 From a libertarian point of view, I have no real issues of companies, ON THEIR OWN, deciding to mandate vaccines. However, like any other company activity, the company should and must be liable for vaccine injury. Just like if an employee gets hurt while taking fork lift training, because the training was required.

    5. I do have a problem with the Federal government making any of these mandates on businesses. It’s simply not constitutional. Jaccobsen v Massachusetts has nothing to do with the Federal government.

    6. These folks keep trivializing it as just a “jab”. So we should start telling everyone that getting a vasectomy is just a snip, right?

    7. The argument in regards to the safeness of the Covid vaccines to any other vaccines are simply not sound. Most required vaccines didn’t become requirements until years after being administered. The Polio vaccine, for example, shows that we have had a bad track record in the past of developing vaccines.

    8. VAERS is a terrible system. We have no real data on vaccine injury or death. As pointed out, much of it isn’t reviewed. It’s also been reported that vaccine injuries and deaths are severely underreported because at the time of death, the doctors may not know the vaccination status of the individual and won’t be reported or investigated.

    9. From my own personal experience with getting the vaccine, many of these vaccine places are woefully unprepared for any sort of anaphylaxis which, while rare, is associated to varying degrees with these vaccines.

    10. If we truly cared about work safety and Covid, we’d be looking at antibody tests instead of vaccine cards. No one on that side is talking about previous infection and immunity from it.

    11. I am not an anti-vaxxer. I did get my first dose recently as it has been a year since I had Covid. I was extremely hesitant because the vaccine hasn’t been out all that long and the original trials did not have any previous Covid positive patients in the trials. How were we supposed to know how previous Covid patients would react? We now know, after months of some getting seriously ill from the vaccines when they previously had covid just weeks earlier However, the CDC nor the FDA refuse to pass along that information. Even local nurses here are suggesting 30 days because they’ve seen patients get sick if they’ve had covid sooner than that.

    12. I really don’t think these people in charge, the media, and the most vocal on social media realize that many who voted for Biden, who exist on varying degrees on the left, are not vaccinated and refuse to get vaccinated for whatever reasons. I don’t think the Democrats realized that they just crapped on a whole group of people who voted for Biden. The media won’t talk about the low minority vaccination rates. And many hard core democrats I personally know, believe that the role of government isn’t to be telling people how to handle their own medical care. I was genuinely shocked how principled they were.

    Reply
    • dejal

      2. Now of course the argument is now about filling up hospitals, and that the unvaccinated could cause a vaccinated person not to get treatment The fundamental flaw in this logic is there are so many preventable things individuals can do to keep themselves out of the hospital, Covid in the grand scheme of things is just one in a long list. We have never mandated any measures to reduce health problems to keep people out of the hospitals.

      AIDS. Smoking. Obesity. Drug Abuse. Booze.
      “OK EVERYONE. COVID and beds for patients is the priority. If you have one of the above issues, sucks to be you for the duration”.

      Reply
      • stingray65

        Most of the patients in the hospital who have Covid are there for another reason and also have Covid. If you are not obese, do not have diabetes, cancer, heart disease, compromised immune system, and aren’t over 70 the chances of Covid putting your in the hospital is very small. To the extent that Covid is actually a “crisis” is because we have lots of old people (which means something didn’t kill them earlier), and/or lots of people with mostly self-inflicted co-morbidities that make them more susceptible to being pushed over the edge by Covid. For healthy younger people the regular flu and/or the Covid vaccine offers a higher probability of serious health consequences than Covid.

        Reply
  17. Bon Ivermectin

    Woah; wait a minute Jack: “…the ghost of my father…”. I thought he was alive quite recently? My condolences.

    Reply
  18. Bon Ivermectin

    From Japan:
    https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/2021.08.22.457114v1.full
    The SARS-CoV-2 Delta variant is poised to acquire complete resistance to wild-type spike vaccines
    Abstract

    mRNA-based vaccines provide effective protection against most common SARS-CoV-2 variants. However, identifying likely breakthrough variants is critical for future vaccine development. Here, we found that the Delta variant completely escaped from anti-N-terminal domain (NTD) neutralizing antibodies, while increasing responsiveness to anti-NTD infectivity-enhancing antibodies. Although Pfizer-BioNTech BNT162b2-immune sera neutralized the Delta variant, when four common mutations were introduced into the receptor binding domain (RBD) of the Delta variant (Delta 4+), some BNT162b2-immune sera lost neutralizing activity and enhanced the infectivity. Unique mutations in the Delta NTD were involved in the enhanced infectivity by the BNT162b2-immune sera. Sera of mice immunized by Delta spike, but not wild-type spike, consistently neutralized the Delta 4+ variant without enhancing infectivity. Given the fact that a Delta variant with three similar RBD mutations has already emerged according to the GISAID database, it is necessary to develop vaccines that protect against such complete breakthrough variants.

    Reply
  19. sgeffe

    Nobody seems to know if there’s anything bad which could result from the Janssen/J&J jabs, which I took mainly because of the “one and done” of it! But it’s a more “old-school” vaccine versus the mRNA types! I got sick for a day literally 12 hours after getting the shot, but was OK later in the day after popping a couple Motrin. My sister-in-law recommended that you get the vaccine if you can, because if nothing else, it should keep you out of the hospital if you were to contract COVID-19. (I think I may have had COVID-19 in December of 2019, a month before it became a household word in the United States; I had a fever for a couple days without the usual loss of appetite which usually goes along with it. Not a huge deal, except for the three weeks following that when I had the worst cough I’ve had in decades! Unfortunately, I never got an antibody test to determine if in fact I’d had it! Got the J&J shot in April of this year, with no aftereffects save for the reaction the day after the poke!)

    “Fast food,” at least around me, aside from pizza places, is a joke; all of the major ones didn’t re-open their lobbies for in-person dining after the worst of COVID-19 passed, thanks to blithering-idiot Biden and his endless handouts, which has caused chronic staffing shortages, where I’m sure that it’s a miracle that the people inside can barely keep up with the orders for the teeming masses clogging the drive-thru lanes, as well as the surrounding streets! Make sure that the fast food app you’re using allows you to cancel an order! (After finding out, while sitting in the parking lot of my local Burger King, that their app DOESN’T allow for cancellation of an order without all sorts of hoop-jumping, including, I’m sure, having to spend time on the phone with someone from some Indian-subcontinent shithole whose English-as-an-eighth-language conversation combined with an accent as thick as a slab of concrete will have you cursing them out, I sat in line, wearing out the power button of my Accord lest I burn a half-tank of gas just idling, for ** 40 ** minutes a couple Friday evenings ago!) I had put together a McDonald’s breakfast order in that app this last Sunday morning, but nodded-off afterwards, so I was a little late getting over there, and canceled the order when I saw that the line of cars in the drive-thru was probably going to be at least a twenty-minute wait, after which time, I went back home after canceling the order and made myself a piece of toast!

    I have started leaving over my usual 20% tip in restaurants, as they’re hurting for help, as well.

    Reply
  20. Ryan

    Having worked a number of shitty retail/service jobs in my teens and early 20s, I try to have sympathy for those who actually are showing up to work and trying to tough it out. That said, it’s becoming increasingly frustrating.

    Even in my corner of suburbia hell, the restaurant situation is a complete mess. I’ve been working odd hours as of late and found myself trying to grab a quick bite late last Thursday. Most everything aside from Taco Bell and White Castle closes by 11 nowadays, even the previously 24 hour diners. The only places open late these days are ironically chain restaurants like Applebee’s or Chili’s, which aren’t exactly the first thing that comes to mind when you think of late night eateries.

    McDonald’s is particularly bad. Not only do the close earlier than almost every other fast food restaurant, most of their dining rooms have been closed since March of 2020. While not my first choice, it was always comforting to know that I could stop in somewhere on a road trip to hit the restroom and grab a Coke. Nowadays, even that is a crapshoot.

    Reply
    • Ice Age

      A long time ago, I worked retail as well, and all it did was make me more misanthropic than I already was. I hated it. I hated the terrible pay, I hated the customers, I hated the company always siding with the customer in a dispute. If somebody offered to pay me more money than one of those jobs to NOT WORK, my 20-year-old self would’ve jumped on it.

      But not because I hate to work. I like to work. It’s being someone else’s employee that burns me, even to this day.

      I’ve often wondered if my spotty history of employment is that way because I have an actual overactive sense of integrity, or because I just want an excuse to get out of another job I’ve grown to hate.

      Reply
      • Dirty Dingus McGee

        ” It’s being someone else’s employee that burns me, even to this day.”

        Even if you’re the owner of a business, you’re still “someone else’s employee” to an extent. You have to deal with customer’s daily, some good some not so much. Doesn’t matter if you run a hot dog cart or Amazon, it can still be a hassle.

        Last week I had to make a trip to calm down a customer who was having a panic attack over an upcoming, next week upcoming, project. The cost for that trip comes out of the bottom line, so now slightly less profit on this project. And I’m going to end up being there for at least parts of the project, which was not in the budget, so less profit still.

        Reply
        • Ryan

          I’ve said this for years. The one thing that didn’t change as I transitioned from retail to the corporate world is that I still hate the customers. The only difference now is that they’re “internal” customers and I can’t chase them away.

          Reply
      • Jack Baruth Post author

        I hear my own voice in this. I’m a great worker, when I’m self-employed or doing exactly what I want to do.

        Reply
  21. hank chinaski

    No control group and self reported side effects do not a scientific study make, yet it’s decreed both needed and ‘safe and effective’ for literally everyone (cue the Gary Oldman ‘The Professional’ meme).

    Honk!

    Reply
  22. gtem

    To me the most egregious fallout of all this COVID stuff have been the crazy powertrips some flight attendants have been going on, particularly in regard to toddlers not wearing their masks right, or the mask slipping, etc. I canceled our flight to Italy a few months back, my son and I are staying back, my wife just flew out since her folks were already out there. It’s one thing to subject me, a grown man, to all this crap with the paperwork and constantly changing rules of air travel and bossy stewardesses. But you try to come after my little boy and I’m coming after you, right there on the plane. So I thought it best to simply not put ourselves in that situation.

    Reply
  23. gtem

    On the Lexus article: it’s on point that you mention the Ford Edge. About 4 years ago I was renting a lot of them, the 2nd gen car, mostly Titanium trim cars with the 2.0T and AWD. I was initially entirely ambivalent on them, perhaps a bit impressed with the wallop of torque from the 2.0T Ecoboost, then I chanced to rent one for personal use to drive down to Charlotte from Indianapolis for a friend’s wedding (after somehow forgetting to buy airfare). I tend to bitch about crossovers and the “normies’ ” attachment to them as much as most other car guys but man that 8 hour drive really sold me on how relaxing and nice to drive that car was. Downpours on the twisty bits of I75 handled with ease and poise, all day comfy seats, quiet, nice grunt down low. And yeah that higher up seating was part of that feeling of security and comfort. I’d say a Ford Edge is probably 85% of an RX350 for 60% of the price. Some slightly sloppy exterior fit/finish, who cares. No idea how they hold up in 10-15 years, per my understanding the 2.0EB is much better than the 1.5/1.6Eb units in regards to carbon fouling/running “dirty.” My folks have owned an ’09 RX350 from 15k miles and three years old. At around 100k miles now It’s held up well, has had cold-start piston slap from new, apparently that’s a thing on a run of the 3.5L Toyota V6s in this year range. Has had a lazy VVT solenoid replaced (another somewhat common problem, this car gets timely synthetic oil changes but also sees a lot of short trips). And some oil cooler lines replaced pre-emptively. They get brittle with age and when they let go they can starve a motor for oil and wipe it out incredibly quickly. But the interior, compete with cassette deck, is really nice and has held up great, better than the cost-cut 2010+ gen of RX.

    Reply
  24. CJinSD

    A truly remarkable number of readers of “The Truth About Cars” somehow were so ill-informed that they purchased the biggest automotive turkey of recent years. Now GM is asking them to park their Bolts far from valuable cars, structures and people. One EV advocate helpfully pointed out that Elon Musk said ‘large pouch cells’ invite thermal runaway leading to infernos. In other news, the NTSB is investigating a crash in Florida involving one of those safe Tesla Model 3 EVs where they have yet to identify the immolated and cremated remains of the two EV occupants.

    Reply
    • John C.

      Knowing that the Bolt is farmed out to Samsung in South Korea, our dear ally to whom we owe so much after being given the honor of sacrificing 58,000 men for ?, do you frame this as a hit on GM? Oh yea, because you are super conservative copy pasta man. Do you ever think about what you write?

      Reply
      • CJinSD

        This was a hit on the current quality of TTAC and EVs in general, but you saw it as a hit on GM. Perhaps this is a reflection of why your growth as a human being has been so pitifully stifled. GM making garbage is a given after all these decades. The sad thing is that people who spend their time on a website that purports to inform about cars and the industry are still buying GM’s practical jokes. That I brought up Tesla’s latest luau should have told you that I blame EVs for the fires more than just the usual GM incompetence and avarice.

        Reply
        • John C.

          “I blame EVs for the fires more than just the usual GM incompetence and avarice.”

          How generous and touching, but you really should have included a defense of Korea. Their wonderfulness being such that to not acknowledge it smacks of ignorance. When Korea offers up an electric powertrain to not accept it really would be a prime example of GM incompetence and avarice. Up there with the time Henry Ford II refused Honda drivetrains for the first Fiesta.

          You should also remember the Japanese Panasonic role in the Tesla drivetrain. If the fireproof standards exceed the no doubt off the chart high standards of the Japanese industrial powerhouse, to bring up anecdotal fires smacks of Q style conspiracies.

          As far as the intelligence of the TTAC commentariat. To question it seems to cast aspersions on the Canadian management’s use of the term Best & Brightest. I myself take the label approved directly by our betters in Canada quite seriously and unsure of my own limited capabilities have never commented there.

          Reply
          • CJinSD

            Doesn’t GM sell Daewoos as Chevrolets and Buicks? How can you defend GM while attacking the Korean cars that they pass off as their own? I’d point out the percentage of AC Delco parts that are made in China, but you obviously don’t lump the Chinese in with the Asians that you detest.

          • stingray65

            John – how would you rank the quality of the following:

            Mid-70s to early 90s GM vehicle made from fake wood, fake chrome, and fake craftsmanship by 100% UAW members in the USA, which subsequently exploded, burned, dissolved, or otherwise disappointed the sucker making 72 easy monthly payments to GMAC.

            OR

            Recent Chevy Bolt made from Korean, Chinese, and Mexican parts and subsidized by US taxpayers, which subsequently burns down the house of the sucker making 36 easy monthly lease payments.

          • CJinSD

            It’s entertaining that the suckers who never moved on through decades of awful GM vehicles were downright pleased when GM started selling them Daewoo Lacettis and Korean Mokkas instead of the usual dreck. It’s even more entertaining if you remember that selling Daewoos disappointed Suzuki’s customers to the point of killing their car lines and caused Daewoo to fall flat as a stand alone brand. I guess GM buyers have lower standards than even the credit criminals of the import market.

          • John C.

            So lets get this straight. When the big three built cars for intact American families designed and assembled to even it smallest componant by Americans with secure living wages that often lasted 100,000 miles with minimal maintanance at a time when most imports went 40,000 without extrordinary maintanance that was bad because subversives thought it would be fun for them to instead drive Hondas. The subversives friends in government then required mileage and emissions rules only doable in the smallest cars. Then the big three rise to that challenge building amazingly efficient cars that passed all the hurdles while still going 100k with minimal maintained but a few cold engine burps that period Honda shared. Bad quality so screams the long haired subversives, learn something from our smart Asian friends who understand the needs of long hairs and women and by the way now you must haven no rather than small emissions. Broke daised and defeated as a Towns Van Zant song they accept Asian electric outsourcing. Now God those domestic electric powertrains are fire hazards they sure suck. Makes you wish pancho the hippy and lefty the subversive had been caught earlier by the Federales

          • Ronnie Schreiber

            When the big three built cars for intact American families designed and assembled to even it smallest componant by Americans with secure living wages that often lasted 100,000 miles with minimal maintanance

            “Minimal maintanance” and 100,000 mile durability? That’s bullshit. I was born in 1954. In the 1960s it was not unusual for an American made car to need an engine or transmission rebuilt at 50,000 miles. Engine and transmission rebuilders were plentiful. If a car had 100,000 miles on it, it was a “$50 special”, disposable. Cars needed lots of routine maintanance just to stay running, like regular “plugs, points, and condenser” tuneups beyond the ability of most consumers, and suspensions were filled with lots of Zerk fittings for needed lubrication.

            There are a lot of people that are under the illusion that the 1950s and early 1960s were some kind of golden age for American technology and that American manufacturers never cut corners to save money. Yes, there were lots of great companies making great stuff but not everything was made to McIntosh or Collins standards. Line up five 1959 Fender Bassman amplifiers and they’ll all sound a bit different from each other due to stuff like 20% tolerance values on resistors and capacitors. I’ve seen stuff like companies using corrugated cardboard as a heat insulator. Hell, when his engineers were testing tv and radio circuits, Earl Muntz would take a diagonal cutters and start removing what he thought were superfluous components until the signal was lost and say, “I guess we have to leave that in.”

            Nat Daniels’ Danelectro brand of guitars came about because he had contracts to fill at Sears and Montgomery Wards and he needed to make them cheaper than Leo Fender could, so he made the bodies out of a hardwood frame, with Masonite covers, and pickups with no bobbin, just winding the wire around the magnet and stuffing them into surplus lipstick tubes.

            Some stuff from the good old days was indeed good but plenty of it was dreck.

          • John C.

            70s small block Chevy with full oil pan and coolant =100k, Dito LA V8 Windsor V8 AMC V8. Ditto Slant 6 Chevy 6 AMC 6 and if lucky Ford 6. To shit on this remarkable achievement is the super stinky BS. Especially when the alternatives you propose are not even close. And the thing is you all know I am right and just cannot admit your mistakes.

          • stingray65

            Engines and gearboxes were seldom the major problem in the 70s to 90s US cars (except for the Vega, Olds Diesel, Cadillac 8-6-4, 4100, Chrysler Lean Burn, and a few others I’m sure I forget), but the rest of the cars were most often pure crap. Even the durable US motors were generally poor at offering good performance and reasonable fuel economy so you had Ford V-8 motors offering 109 HP and 12 mpg, which is an expensive and painful way to go 100,000 miles.

          • John C.

            But Nirvana, you can capitalize it or not in this sentence and it makes my point, is 57hp 70 foot pounds and 24mpg city, no point talking a highway number it isn’t capable. You avoid the American superiority in A/Cs and automatics by skipping and sweating and solving the limp wrist problem suffered by having your arms go strong wrestling with the steering wheel.

  25. Jim T.

    Jack,

    Any advice for the potentially millions of Americans who are about to lose their jobs (or be placed on indefinite unpaid ‘leave’) over COVID vaccination mandates? Even if the known risks are small, it’s pretty scary when a company – or the government – forces someone to get a potentially deadly injection, even if they are sitting behind a computer screen at home all day. This needs to be a personal choice. And, no, I don’t buy the argument that 100% vaccination will allow America to reopen again and remain safe.

    Reply
    • Jack Baruth Post author

      My feeling is this: There’s no moral duty to comply with an immoral mandate. And there is no moral duty to deal with an immoral mandate in a truthful fashion. But that doesn’t mean you should put yourself in the way of the proverbial Harkonnen fist. I suspect that for many companies the bare minimum will be done or required.

      The purpose of vaccinating anyone but the Boomers and the morbidly obese is simply… compliance.

      Reply

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