Weekly Roundup: Guitar Shows In The Age Of Money Printers Edition

Here’s what I should have done with my $778 in 2012: bought 140 bitcoins, which would now be worth about six million dollars.

Here’s what I actually did: bought a Gibson Les Paul “BFG Gator”.

Today I sold it for $1,079 online. After fees and shipping that’s about $980. If you adjust for the official inflation rate I still made about sixty bucks — but if we’ve learned anything in the past year, it’s that all government statistics are at least partially fabricated, inflation rates most of all.

Why did I sell my Gibson today? Because I listed it on my Reverb store (available here!) and it lasted all of seventeen minutes before selling.

Why did I list it today? Because I just had the most depressing guitar show experience in my life.

Why was it depressing? Let me tell you…

This afternoon I met the fellow who was my guitar teacher from age 12-14, and intermittently since then, at the Ohio Guitar Show in the Columbus-area suburb of Hilliard. In the past few months I’ve periodically dragged my son over to his house to learn a few songs from someone besides me. Yesterday it was “Eleanor Rigby”.

“You’ve heard this song, right, John?” he asked.

“I have never heard this song,” my son replied.

“It’s by the Beatles.”

“I don’t know who that is.” I don’t know why that shocked me. To begin with, the Beatles are to my son as, uh, let me do the math here, Cab Calloway or Duke Ellington would be to me, in terms of time and distance. Furthermore, I almost never listen to the Beatles so there’s no reason John would have heard them. He can reliably tell the difference between Nathan East, Marcus Miller, and Victor Wooten on a record but he has never heard of Paul McCartney. It didn’t stop him from picking up the song, and the associated cello riff that opens it, in about fifteen minutes total. In my experience, there are only two kinds of tunes for my son: the ones he can learn in under half an hour, and the ones that exceed his attention span. So Fourplay’s “Bali Run” is the former, and Pat Metheny’s “Bright Size Life” is the latter; we got about thirty measures in and he flat-out refused to memorize any more of it.

Something else that would exceed his attention span: going to a guitar show. My five-foot-two clone has a remarkable lack of interest in things. Guitars, like bicycles or computers or clothes, are just tools to him. He doesn’t care what they look like or what they cost or what their story is. I think back to the things I desperately wanted at his age, like the GT “Pro Performer” Bicycle, a desire so strong I can still physically evoke it in myself by opening an old BMX magazine to the advertisements, and I wonder at his near-total non-attachment. Surely it’s my fault, because I get him whatever he wants and because we always emphasize what can be done with something rather than the thing itself — but maybe “fault” is the wrong word. Desire, as Harriet Wheeler once sang, is a terrible thing.

Unfortunately, as Harriet also sang, I rely on my desire to animate me on a daily basis. I went to the guitar show with the idea of re-animating that desire a bit. Maybe I’d see something I truly wanted. And so my old teacher and I paid ten dollars each and entered the dimly lit convention center with a little bit of hope in our hearts.

Most of what you see at these shows falls into the following categories:

0. Hugely common guitars (Mexican base-model Stratocasters, Les Paul Juniors) sold at Reverb prices plus twenty percent;
1. Utter trash that shouldn’t be taking up space on the table (Michael Kelly guitars, random Chinese off-brands);
2. Utter trash from previous eras, like Harmony hollowbody acoustics or Mosrites, listed at eye-watering prices;
3. Fenders and Gibsons from the Seventies priced like they were from the Sixties. A 1972 P-Bass for $8,999?
4. Vaguely interesting and worthwhile instruments (Gibson Les Paul Supremes) that look like they were dropped down someone’s basement stairs.

Still, from time to time I’ll find something that I can’t leave the show without. That wasn’t the case this time. I tried to buy a DR-880 drum machine for $180, which would have been a deal, but the seller would only take cash and I didn’t have that much. There was a vendor exclusively devoted to genuinely nice bass guitars. They had three examples of the Peavey T-40, all in good shape. I’ve been thinking about a T-40 for a while; it was what Ross Valory used in the “Escape” era and it has some really outstanding/unique tones. I’d like to get one for my son, because while his hands aren’t quite big enough for a 34″ scale bass at the moment it won’t be long before he gets there.

Here’s the problem: the cheapest T-40 at the show was a thousand bucks. These were $500 guitars… not ten years ago, not five years ago, but last year. That’s insane, because you can get a brand-new USA-made Fender Precision Bass for a thousand dollars. Except you can’t. The base American Performer is now $1,499. The American Professional is $1,749. The American Jaco Pastorius Signature, an example of which I paid $1,300 for a while ago, now sells for $2,049.

This approximate doubling of 2020-era prices isn’t limited to guitar shows. It’s all over the racing hobby as well. A new set of shock absorbers for my Radical PR6, sorely needed because my existing ones are beyond saving, would cost me ten thousand dollars. I settled for ordering a used set. Prior to COVID-19 I’d been idly eyeing a few 6,000-square-foot homes in my approximate vicinity, but I’d quailed at the idea of paying $650,000 for a house. In 2022, $650k gets you… well, it gets you my existing crib in the slightly nicer neighborhood next door.

Chances are you already know what’s happened to used-car prices. They say that’s a special case, because the supply of new cars is so tight, but it’s also affecting the price of automotive parts, even the ones that have no microchips in them. The Hoosier tires for my Honda Accord race car are now over $500. Each. They have an approximate useful lifespan of sixty to eighty minutes. SCCA entry fees are half again what they were in 2020. Apparently most regions are still losing money on road racing despite the increased cost. In every aspect of my life — cyclist, auto racer, musician, idiot who buys overpriced crap — I’m hearing alarm bells about price increases that have happened or are about to happen.

It’s obvious to anyone with half a brain that we are squarely back in the Ford/Carter era of rampant inflation. Some of you will recall those days; automakers raised prices four times a year, and General Motors made major hay by subsidizing auto loans at 12.9 percent. Yesterday I was wandering through an Atari computer archive and I found this:

Mortgage rates at 14.5 percent! No wonder my father groaned under the weight of an $88,000 house in 1982. It’s just a $550k house now; why, that’s hardly a six-fold increase in value! For context, the minimum wage was $3.35 then; it’s seven and a half bucks today. No wonder Generation Z doesn’t give a shit about outmoded notions of American dreams and private property. Why should they, when it’s obvious to all and sundry that they’ll never have any of it. A nation of apartment-dwellers doing gig work is not going to vote for anything that preserves the traditional way of life in this country, for the same reason that I don’t mail half of my paycheck to the Queen of England.

The difference between 1980 and today? I hate to say it, but my impression of the Carter era, and this might just be my youth and naivete at the time, was that we had serious men in charge of the country. They weren’t always right — far from it. But they were serious and they understood basic concepts of responsibility. Below the serious men who ran the country we had the serious men who ran the states, and the corporations, and the cities, and the villages, and their individual households. Sometimes they ran the institutions under their control into the ground, as was done with General Motors, but you always got the sense that we had adults involved in the process.

When Mr. Biden was placed into office last year, we heard a lot from the media about how “the adults in the room” were back in charge. And yet what happened afterwards would be more or less what you’d expect if you took the country out of the hands of adults and gave it into the power of petulant children. The government has been feckless in every aspect, from monetary policy to COVID-19. Other than warning Americans that the insufficiently vaccinated face a “winter of severe illness and death”, a bizarre ejaculation that had no tangible correlation to the facts on the ground then or now, Mr. Biden’s primary pandemic actions have been an unconstitutional attempt to force vaccine mandates by proxy and a recent admission that this disease will need to be handled at the state level. One cannot help but feel that Mr. Trump would have been better for the economy, and that a 200-pound sandbag placed on the seat in the Oval Office would have been better still.

We’ve been told that the annual inflation rate is hovering between five and seven percent, but that’s an obvious lie that would exceed the ability of the Iraqi Information Minister to repeat without laughing; I don’t know anyone who thinks that the real-world year-over-year rate from 2020 to 2021 was less than fifteen percent. Twenty or thirty percent seems like a safer bet. That’s certainly where the asset prices are going. The cynical among us could see this as a final push to make sure the Boomers stay wealthy until the end of their time on Earth; in a world where the Fed keeps the rate so low that you can literally get rich borrowing money to buy any tangible asset whatsoever, the Boomers’ remarkable hold on those assets will keep them in cash for quite some time.

Certainly it amounts to yet another squeeze on the middle class. Transfer payments will rise with inflation, of course, and the assets of the fabled One Percent will appreciate ahead of the inflation rate, but those of us who are drawing a salary in the middle will likely see an effective pay cut every year from now until who knows when. How long until the rest of us just give up, sell our homes to Blackrock, and fall headlong into the transfer-payments demographic?

I’ll tell you what people are not doing: they’re not selling their guitars. As with cars, it seems like a better idea to hold onto what you have rather than to overpay for something new. The owner of Cream City Music, a great Wisconsin shop that sold me a few nice Godin synthaxes a decade ago, was standing forlorn at an empty table, trying to buy guitars from the people who came into the show. After six hours at said table, he had a total of seven cases stacked up next to him, and an unspent stack of hundred-dollar bills perhaps four inches deep in his pocket. “Not what I expected,” he told me. A young man with a vintage Kramer bass showed up; one of the ones with a laminated body. “I need eight hundred bucks,” he said.

“Seven,” the Cream City man said.

“It’s gotta be eight,” he replied.

“What the hell, let’s do it, I’m gonna leave here with an empty van at this rate, so I need to buy.” Eight hundred-dollar bills were peeled off. Last year that was suicide money for a Kramer bass. Now? The cheapest laminated-body model on Reverb is listed at $1,615. It’s an eight hundred mile roundtrip from Milwaukee to here, but you don’t need too many deals like that to make your time worthwhile, the same way CarMax would happily pay me $25k for my Lincoln MKT because there’s a buyer waiting to pay $30k.

“You wanna give me nine grand for my Gibson R9?” I asked him.

“Go home and get it,” he replied. So I went home, but rather than return with my Lester I reopened my Reverb shop and listed three guitars at slightly unreasonable prices. Seventeen minutes later, I was down to two guitars. Judging by the amount of people who have looked at the other two listings, I don’t think they’ll last very long, either. My first impulse: take that money and buy a Peavey T-40. Second, and lasting, impulse: hold on to the money. But not too long, because it’s shedding value as I hold it, Weimar-style.

That’s the strangest thing about our superheated, underpowered economy: clearly the smart move is to sell everything you own and put the money into stable assets. Except: if the interest rate goes back up, and it seems set to do just that, the prices of everything will sink. Or will they? If Blackrock is buying all the homes (there’s not a single completed house for sale in my zip code) and they’re playing with house money, why would they stop?

In the meantime, I’m going to stay away from the guitar shows. I recommend you do the same. As is always the case, I have quite a few very special instruments stashed away and I’ll cheerfully make one available under market price for a Riverside Green reader. Feel free to take twenty percent off any Reverb listing of mine you see, or inquire about what you don’t. In particular, I have two very nice PRS Modern Eagles, one with a Brazilian rosewood neck and the other with an Indian rosewood neck. Worst case scenario, you buy one and sell it for more in five years. Or is that the best case scenario? What does it say about us if we can’t decide?

* * *

For Hagerty, I discussed open-source EVs and reviewed a truly strange Mitsubishi.

167 Replies to “Weekly Roundup: Guitar Shows In The Age Of Money Printers Edition”

  1. John Van Stry

    If you had a bunch of cash right now, where would you invest it?
    Like you said, the government is giving free money away to the corps to buy up all the houses, so that’s a tough market.

    Reply
  2. LynnG

    Jack,
    Read your Open Source EV on Hargerty earlier and this crossed my mind, what if I said Open Source EV’s or any open source car manufacturing will not succeed and I will give you a real I think example…. Checher Car Company, this manufacture build a nearly indistructable car right here in American and sold to a dedicated customer base with loyal users. Checker was a kind of open source car manufacuer in that the engines were the 350ci V8, the transmissions were the indistructable legendaryTH-400, verious trim and lights came from all three major manufacturer, and they had what 5 maybe 15 mph bumpers before anyone else, pluse they had rear seat leg room that would make first class on an Asian flag carrier look tight. However, the death of the company came when their open source for engines stop selling to them. Therefore, just like a third political party will never get any where because the major parties will co-op their ideas, and open source car company will fail when the major players will not sell to them. Bricklin would be another example. Just my thoughts.

    Reply
    • Carmine

      I have to disagree here, GM was happy to keep selling engines to Checker, the death of Checker came when cab companies decided most of their customers were ok riding in cheap Ford, Plymouth and Chevrolet full size sedans instead of a dedicated 7 passenger LWB taxi. No one wanted Checkers anymore, not even cab companies.

      Big 3 fleet sedan sales had been eating into Checker sales since the 1960’s and no one really wanted one as a private passenger car no matter how durable and rugged they were.

      GM and former GM VP Ed Cole were even involved in trying to modernize Checker in the late 70’s by coming up with FWD replacement concepts that were going to use the upcoming X-car subframe and a minvan-esque shaped body, though that all lost traction when Ed Cole was killed in private plane crash in 1977. Checker still toyed around with a few prototypes using stretched Rabbits and early Citations but management could see the writing was on the wall for Checker as an independent carmaker.

      Checker shut down its car assembly, but it was a component supplier to the Big 3 into the late 2000’s, they made unibody sub assemblies for the 5th gen Camaro for example, among other car parts, I think they finally went out of business around 2015.

      Reply
      • Ronnie Schreiber

        The last time that I wrote about Checker was a few years ago. At the time, the only corporate remnant was a holding company belonging to members of the Markin family. Morris Markin, the company founder, was an interesting fellow. He originally owned both the Checker car company and the Checker taxi cab company in Chicago. After his home in Chicago was bombed in 1923 as part of a mob-related taxi cab war, Markin moved his carmaking operations to Kalamazoo and got out of the cab business.

        Reply
      • LynnG

        Carmine,
        You are far more knowledgable then I so I will defer to your take on the issue, However, I know I read somewhere in the 1980’s (Motortrend/Car&Drive as I was a dedicated subscriber back then) that GM and Ford had determined not to sell engines to Checker as they were utilizing their remaining production capacity of V8’s to their trucks. Unlike John Deere which manufacturers their own engines in Iowa and are not dependent on the big 3. But my point is that any manufacturer that is dependent on “open source” components has the potential of their supply of those necessary components being cut off. That is why, unlike sofeware, if a manufacturers primary source of a necessary component gets cut off or taken away they will perish. Again thanks for the addtional information, the contributors here are very knowledgable which adds to the conversation.

        Reply
        • dejal

          Like AMC. They’d buy all kinds of things from at least GM + Chrsyler. But, AMC would have to pay relatively street prices for each unit instead of at cost that those divisions making the parts would “Sell” to the brands.

          Reply
  3. PaulyG

    Basic concepts: Inflation is not transitory, Jack’s characterizations as Ford/Carter is spot on.

    What loses: cash, fixed rate bonds, smaller companies that have less pricing power, companies with high price/earnings ratios (as interest rates go up, it affects this ratio in a negative way)

    What wins: floating rate debt (will go up with interest rates), leveraged companies (their debt load inflates away). hard assets (real estate), companies that control hard assets like oil, gas, fertilizer, chemicals, metals, etc.), companies with lower price/earnings ratios, large companies with pricing power or monopoly characteristics.

    Reply
  4. PaulyG

    and stay away from ESG stuff, everyone I know managing big endowments or portfolios are not involved and won’t be until some gov reg forces their hands.

    The Fed should have turned off the printing presses back in 2010. Now they are between a rock and a hard place on raising rates without tanking everybody’s 401Ks

    Reply
  5. sightline

    Let’s not even get started on the prices of Rolexes.

    As a the youngest Xer one can be, I am enjoying the massive turnaround of pre-2020 “Millenials don’t want things, they want experiences into “Millenials are all into buying stuff – houses, cars, watches, etc.

    (I think generational generalizing is carp BTW, but I’m all in on narrative shifts).

    Reply
    • Tyler

      was it ever even generational, rather than simply urban vs. everywhere else?

      When (mobile and usually college-educated) Midwestern Millenials were 23, they moved to Chicago. Or the most Chicago-like city or neighborhood they could afford. The jobs were better. The meat markets were meatier. Now the eldest of them/us is 40. They want yards and decent schools. Boring middle age comes for us all. But I doubt permanent residents of the cities have shifted their priorities much over that span.

      Related… The “end of Gen X” line always seems to shift based on the point that needs making. IMO it’s cell phones that changed everything, and smartphones that blew the doors open, which puts the division in the mid/late-1980s birth years. Older than that your parents were still Boomers, your education was still geared for the Cold War, computers were in the computer lab, and the wildest change in communication and daily routines you experienced before age 20 or so was AOL Instant Messenger. Older than that and you were essentially online all day everyday by grade school, and WW2 vets to you are fossils like Great War vets were in the 90s.

      Reply
      • sightline

        Observationally? I think you’re right – it was always more of an urban/suburban/rural thing, not an age thing. Especially since “Millennial” corresponded with “significantly rising rents in cities, leading to people spending more income on rent, and having less money and room for other things”.

        I tend to draw the line, like you, using technology. So Gen X is “did you use electronic communication at college/work”, Millennial is “did you grow up with the Web”, and Gen Z is “did you have a smartphone from a young age”

        Reply
        • stingray65

          Technology is interesting, but whose lives have changed more?

          The Greatest Generation: lived through the Great Depression (25% unemployment, 90% reduction in stock market), and WWII (rationing at home and 400,0000+ US casualties), Korean and Vietnam wars, Cold war/rise of Communism, and polio scares (average victim age < 30). Went from outhouses, lanterns, wood stoves, Model T Fords, telegraph, and cash only to indoor plumbing, electricity, telephones, jet airliners, and credit cards.

          Millennials: lived through greatest stock market expansion in history, greatest reduction in poverty in history, fall of Communism, Gulf War (US casualties about 400), 9/11 and war on terror (7,770 US casualties from all causes), and Covid (average victim age 80+). Went from climate controlled homes/offices/schools, mobile phones, Internet, cheap jet travel, and McMansions with a German or Japanese car in the garage to smart phones, social media, and cheap travel, and McMansions with a US Pickup or Japanese/German SUV or Tesla in the garage.

          Reply
          • stingray65

            My point was that many people look at all the craziness of today in terms of declining mental health, wokeness, idiot Leftist politicians, etc. and blame it in part on the fast pace of technological change and/or ground-breaking current events, but earlier generations went through far more serious technological change and far bigger events without going crazy so perhaps it is something else.

          • dejal

            I follow a small time Taiwan Youtuber. Retired social worker. He’s into day hikes in the hills and cities. He occasionally shows photos when he as a kid. He’s 60 or 61. None of the photos show his old man, so I don’t know if the parents were divorced or if he died. He was born and raised in Taipei City. Still lives there.

            One video he comes to traffic island. It’s near a Costco. “I lived right here”. The old photos show a “House” that most of us would use for garden tools. I think there were 4 kids and mom. Up until the late 70s, the whole country was mostly like that. Now, it’s high rises for 200 miles that never seem to end.

            Speaking of polio and that time. My mom was 1 of 5 kids. A sister and brother both had polio, another brother was deaf. The brother with polio hit the beach at Normandy and his unit won a Bronze Star citation.

            To these people, it is and was all gravy.

  6. Economist

    I am trying to convince my wife that we should follow a dirtbike-based investment strategy.
    All three of my dirtbikes have at least doubled in value over the panic. The kids bikes keep accruing value. PW50s are fetching a grand or more.
    Meanwhile, I am looking for a 125 for my 11 year old to start learning a clutch and buying new seems like a viable option because I may be able to sell it for more than the purchase price.

    Reply
    • gtem

      I’m starting to eyeball PW50s and have noticed that same issue. IIRC a new one is $1695, if you can find one, which has been a problem. Like all powersports/outdoor toy stuff, people have been buying stuff up like crazy since the beginning of covid. Used ones are solidly in the $1k range, dubious quality runners for $600-700 but there’s a good chance you’ll get some slapped together turd with RTV oozing out of places it shouldn’t.

      Reply
  7. Ryan

    I don’t know shit about guitars, but that sounds like the last gun show that I went to. Even though some of the market has settled, there are still sales on GB that I can’t help but shake my head at.

    The same goes for used sports cars. It’ll be going on two years that I haven’t really driven the Vette. Now it’s worth what I paid 8 years and 50000 miles ago. I’ve been thinking of selling it to buy some acreage up north or a pre-86 MG.

    My reasoning is that I don’t use the thing and any “upgrade” like a C6 Z06 Carbon or ZR1 would also sit. Selling the car and not putting the money into something tangible seems like a dumb idea in 2021.

    Reply
    • John Van Stry

      I have a sportscar I bought new in 2013. I drive it about once a month. I could sell it right now for almost what I bought it for (it’s only got 22K miles on it).
      I’ve thought about it, but what then? Right now I don’t see it going down in value and replacing it wouldn’t be cost effective. Plus I’m down to two cars, so it’s good to have a backup.

      Reply
    • jc

      Gun stuff is nuts. I could double my money on my WASR that’s been used pretty hard, and I only bought it in 2018. If I was old I could have had it way cheaper. Only problem is if I sell it, I’ll never own another AK cause I don’t think they’re worth what people think they are

      Reply
      • Rya

        Yeah, I don’t know why AKs got so crazy. The drum mag that came with my Mak90 is almost worth what I paid for the whole setup 10 years ago.

        Reply
  8. stingray65

    Interesting that your son John is so uninterested in “things”, because if he is even somewhat representative of his generation it does not bode well for those putting big money into “collectable” guitars, guns, cars, watches, etc., because stuff is only worth what people are willing/able to pay for it. Also interesting to speculate about the future collectability of the few things that young people do seem to care about, which are the hand-held electronic devices that as you rightly state turn into bricks when the manufacturer decides to no long support the hardware or operating system. As least with an old gun, guitar, car, or watch you can use it and enjoy it as intended if you desire, or use it as art if you do not want to “wear it out”, but is an iPhone, iPad, Galaxy, or Telsa brick going to have much nostalgia value as a display item?

    Reply
    • Keith

      If or when they start making money, they will get interested.

      If I have a credible line of sight to being able to afford something, it is fun to shop and daydream. But if I don’t know how I’ll get the money to buy something, I prefer to just ignore it.

      This is akin to Scott Locklins theory on tech development that I really like. Something that is 20 years away, is never happening. That’s not an actionable plan, it’s just a dream. Something within reach in 5 years is serious.

      Reply
      • stingray65

        I don’t know Keith – back in the good old days when the minimum wage was well under $2 per hour and interest rates on loans were very high, and well before my cohort had our driver’s license, we read the car magazines and dreamed of new Corvettes, Porsches, or Jeeps, and looked longingly at new shotguns and rifles, fancy watches and calculators at the mall, and dreamed of one day having the means to buy our dream possessions even though it was many years away. And when we got our licenses and started our minimum wage jobs after school most of us ended up with rusty old beaters or 250cc motorcycles, a Timex, and a hand-me down old shotgun instead of the much fancier/more powerful/pricier stuff we had fantasized about. So perhaps today’s younger generations are more realistic or rational by not investing time and energy into material fantasies, but on the other hand it seems a large number of them believe in socialism, 176 genders, that police are the biggest danger to black men, and that windmills and solar panels will keep them warm on a -25 night, which I dare say are much more destructive fantasies.

        Reply
        • danio

          My youngest brother (Gen Z), much younger than me, however, isn’t interested in anything. Not to maintain a driver license, meaningful career, buy a house or maintain personal relationships with more than a few people. He’s very much an aspie that considers most aspects of life just noise to be ignored. Not because he was opressed by boomers and *gave up*, he never even expressed a desire to start down that path.

          My kids, which are a few years younger than JB’s son, are very much interested in things. Specifically, small bore dirtbikes, ATVs, horses, firearms, video games, RC cars and other assortments of eye wateringly expensive hobbies. So are all their little spoiled brat friends.

          Both anecdotal data points, that don’t prove or disprove any particular theory. It’s always been hard for young people to get established. It furthers no one’s agenda to admit that their ingroup isn’t part of some sort of perpetual victimhood.

          Reply
          • gtem

            Stingray seems to enjoy pitting the Greatest Generation against the supposedly feckless millenials/zoomers, while ignoring the absolute utopia (relatively speaking) that his Boomer generation grew up in. In general these generational pissing contests are an idiotic waste of time.

          • stingray65

            gtem – I’m not sure I have ever mentioned the greatest generation before or pitted them against another generation. Every older generation thinks the younger generations are lazier, stupider, and weaker because they have things so comparatively easy, and I have seen old newspapers and magazines from the 1930s (school research project) that were calling what we now revere as the “greatest generation” lazy, stupid, and weak and probably the end of mankind. Every generation has its challenges, but comparatively speaking most of them have become less deadly and less effortful as time goes by due to advances in science, technology, and the standard of living, but many of us are not grateful enough for these advances because we are ignorant of history.

    • Ryan

      I think as Millennials and Zoomers age, there will be a market for collectibles. Some of those will certainly be “analog” items (see the rise in Pokemon card prices). I doubt people will be collecting nonfunctional electronic devices in the future just as there are few collectors of vintage telegraphs.

      But your right, some of the other “traditional” collectible items I don’t see much interest in going forward. For example, my uncle has a very extensive Postwar Lionel collection. It’s value has probably halved in the past 10 years. Some of the expensive pieces have shot up in value, but the more common stuff has more or less cratered. I enjoy helping him track down oddball pieces, but most of it I have no personal attachment to.

      Guns are an interesting one due to the sheer number of items out there. For example, how many special edition 1911s can one company make? While I love the guy, I see no more value in a John Wayne Commemorative Edition 1911 than I do a Wilson Combat CQB Master. Yes the scrollwork is impressive, but that makes it more of a shelf queen than a tool.

      I have some guns that were passed down to me by my grandfather(s). A few are worth something, most aren’t. They have value to me because they are an heirloom. Shooting big wheel guns and lever actions is fun, but at the end of the day I view them as tools and would much prefer a “soulless” G17 and AR because I know that they will go bang if/when I need them to.

      Reply
      • Carmine

        ” For example, how many special edition 1911s can one company make?”

        I first read this as…

        “how many special edition 911s can one company make?”

        It makes sense both ways…..

        2023 911 GT3 Carrera 4 Club Sport Plus Spyder LeMans Steve McQueen Edition…..

        Reply
        • Ryan

          Fair enough. I think car companies doing this are equally as stupid. We covered Porsche being “uncool” here a few months ago. What you describe is part of the reason.

          Reply
      • hank chinaski

        It’s of note that during the ammo shortage, the ‘cowboy’ calibers were much scarcer, at least online. It might cost over a buck a round, and be from the ex-Eastern Bloc, Korea or the Philippines, but you could buy 9mm.

        Going back a post up or three, for all of its virtues, I question if the AK platform and its calibers would have caught on here as they have if not for the Soviet collapse garage sale.

        Reply
      • danio

        Gun collecting is an intersting point. Interest in them is largely socio-economic rather than by the single point of age. ie. From my casual observation (not scientific) firearm ownership and use per capita is much higher in rural areas versus suburban/urban.

        Young people in my rural area are quite interested in collecting firearms, with some of the clubs I run with being ~50% millenial membership. For me, just like collecting cars, the volume and quality of my collection has increased with disposable income and I would expect that macro trend to continue as millenials come into their own in that department.

        Reply
  9. NoID

    Inflation is pushing me towards retaining our current home when we move to the faux-country (5 acres just north of the city) and turning it into a furnished rental for college students. I could really use the cash from the sale to fund some improvements and nice furniture at the new house, but considering that the value of that cash is plummeting it makes more sense to retain this durable asset and turn it into a revenue stream.

    My son is ***OBSESSED*** with JDM right now, I sent him the Eclipse Cross article to give him a headache. Can’t wait for the conversation that’s going to start when he gets home from school.

    Reply
  10. Jonathan H.

    I had a GT Pro Performer. Chrome with black wheels. My mom moved me and my two brothers from Kentucky to California in 1985 for my stepdad’s job when I was 11. She bought the bike about 8 months after the move to get me to stop bitching about going back to KY and to replace my Diamondback Formula One that I rode the wheels off of. I rode the bike for a couple months before she finally relented and let me move back to my dad’s. The bike stayed behind and was immediately commandeered by my brother. Weeks later he was hit by a car while riding it. He was mostly okay but the bike was not. I think about that bike a lot. I have a mint example of the F1 and always keep my eye out for a nice GT PP. Haven’t found it yet.

    Reply
  11. hank chinaski

    The B’s are a favorite: beans, band-aids, bullets, and booze. Throw in cigarettes I guess….like a prison economy, because this is what this will be. Good tools. I predict that more than a few rural people will return to heating their homes with coal. Once the intarwebs turn off, old fashioned flesh peddling will increase.

    If that Mitsu took off the high heels and lost the rear axle and about 700 pounds, it would probably be a hoot to drive.

    A problem with land as a fixed asset is the carrying costs, namely property tax and insurance, which vary by region.

    I don’t expect Omarova’s idea to Federalize investment and bank accounts to completely go away. At the miniumum they will tax IRAs and 401k’s.

    All the collectible crap that the Boomer’s inflated into the stratosphere will be either warehoused by billionaires or else become firewood.

    Reply
  12. bluebarchetta

    re: “serious men in charge of the country” – they were honest, too, more or less. Could you imagine Jimmy Carter taking kickbacks from the Ukrainians, or selling us out to the Red Chinese? Of course not – Jimmy is a WWII Navy vet. He’d drink gasoline and piss in the fireplace before he’d sell out the good old US of A. Maybe that’s why Jimmy’s still living in the little house in Georgia he and Rosalyn built while Obama enjoys his beachfront home in Martha’s Vineyard and the McMansion he’s building on the old Magnum PI estate.

    Oh, the way Van Halen played.
    Casey Kasem’s hit parade.
    Folks like us, we had it made.
    Those were the days!
    And you knew who you were then,
    Girls were girls and men were men,
    Mister, we could use a man like Ronald Reagan again.
    Didn’t need no welfare state.
    Everybody pulled his weight.
    Dad’s Cutlass Supreme ran great…
    Those were the days!

    Reply
    • stingray65

      Very good, I can hear Archie and Edith singing it now. Of course one of the main themes in All in the Family was feminism, which Archie fought and Meathead supported, and now 50 years later we do have a lot of very serious feminist women in charge (Pelosi, Sotomayor, Birx, AOC, Kamala, Weingarten) much to our detriment with a few rare exceptions. For example, I am sure that a major reason we have never-ending Covid lock-downs and jab/mask mandates is because of risk adverse female influences, and there is little doubt that the expansion of the welfare state, climate change fears, transgender support, and openness to open borders are largely driven by feminist “empathy” and insecurities.

      Reply
      • Andy George

        ^ Lol at this guy just unironically blaming every problem on “female influences.” Somebody is projecting their own relational failures on society.

        Reply
        • Ronnie Schreiber

          Speaking of projection, are you currently in a serious relationship with someone?

          Does espousing feminism get you laid more?

          Reply
          • Andy George

            Yer confused Ron, and in yer confusion, conflating, “pointing out an absurd overgeneralization” with “espousing feminism.”

          • Andy George

            Also, sick burn, dude. “Andy is just projecting out of his sexually-active 22 year marriage.”

            As the father of two daughters, I suppose I think our relationships inform our moral imaginations. And I suspect soured relationships explain a lot of the woman-bashing Ronnie Schreiber and (especially) stingray65 have made their entire platform as Jacklettes here on the green.

          • -Nate

            @ Andy :

            +1,000 and the irony of their continually showing their fear is lost upon them .

            Once you stop projecting fear getting laid is dead easy .

            Takes a while to find just *one* worth sticking with however .

            -Nate

      • Ronnie Schreiber

        I’m glad you mentioned insecurities. Men are greater risk takers and women are less likely to be non-conformists. I guess in a hunter-gatherer society, the gatherers needed to share information and work in a group, while a hunter could go off on his own and bag a deer.

        I’ve found that many women are personally more conservative than their public personas might indicate. They don’t want the mob to single them out and make them a pariah, so they go along.

        Reply
    • Carmine

      He really bought the old Magnum P.I house and tore it down?

      As if you needed more of a reason to dislike him…..

      Reply
  13. gtem

    They finally admitted to the inflation rate being something like 10-11% for 2021, which is still laughable. From my experience at the grocery store (prices up around 30% for many common items) and looking at the increase in used/new car prices (tallied at 24%), I’d put the “real” inflation rate at somewhere around 25%. I made a tidy little sum flipping a few cheap cars in 2021, with a margin of $2000-2500 per car. Not sure whether I’d ever want to make that a fulltime thing… not with cheap everyday stuff anyways. But I would consider specializing and doing some more interesting stuff, say UJM motorcycles, estate-sale sourced Malaise era/80s-90s domestics or something like that. Mark my words we will see $7-10k 90s Park Avenues and Chevy Berettas and the like in the not-too distant future, nostalgia for a more normal time.

    Reply
      • gtem

        No but I definitely believe it! I’ve been watching the motorcycles on there with interest as well: ’79 GS750E with 6k miles in not-quite museum condition for $10k. ’83 Nighthawk 650SC with 18k miles for $5300. ’82 CB900C for $8200! Totally workaday UJMs, I gotta get in on the grift. In fact, I’m currently resurrecting a ’79 GS750E exactly like the one that went for $10k.

        Reply
        • Carmine

          I’ve noticed the all the cheap fun-ride-around motorcycles seem to be gone too…..I’ve looked on and off at getting something old just as a toy, but the prices….

          Reply
          • -Nate

            Carmine ;
            Small Motocycles are out there but the plain facts are : Americans don’t much like and rarely buy them so they’re not much imported by the larger manufacturers .

            I like lightweight Motos, they’re not as fast but they’re far more fun t ride as hard and fast as you can .

            I was looking for a smaller twin and discovered several Chinese made 250 twins , brand new and California legal etc.

            As I tend to hold on to possessions a long time I was a bit concerned with getting carby kits, clutch plates and so on in twenty years so I passed but for the average rider I’d think these affordable bikes might be the answer .

            -Nate

          • CJinSD

            Aren’t the engines for small Chinese motorcycles usually copies of Japanese engines? That might help with service part availability, although maybe not with parts for CARB-approved carburetors.

          • -Nate

            CJ ;

            Yes, mostly so but apart from the Lifan branded ones you never quite know what you’re going to get .

            Plus of course, Chinese ” chabuduo” means it’s anyone’s guess what the end product will be…

            I recently bought what appeared to be an exact copy of a KeiHin P27 carby, it looked fine but had casting errors that prevented the choke from ever working and some internal problem I nor anyone else could figure out .

            I’ve encountered similar problems with Chinese parts being *just* so different they couldn’t be used on a Honda…

            The little twins I looked at appeared to be well built and were about $3,500 (IIRC) but no one selling Chinese bikes is ever going to say ” and best of all ! it’s the same as a 1982 Honda XXXX so parts are dirt cheap !” .

            Not all Chinese Motorbikes are bad by any means .

            -Nate

          • Carmine

            I was looking at vintage….I don’t really buy new and nothing Chinese if in anyway possible….especially nothing Chinese with wheels….

  14. Will

    The Amity Shlaes book, “Great Society” discusses the 60s and what lead to Carter. We didn’t have serious men, but left-wing nutjobs and politicians being subservient to unions (specifically the UAW). It’s hard to read, not because of difficult material, but because every single issue we are dealing with today stems from the morons to lead the country in the 60s. Roosevelt started it, but LBJ closed it and Carter put the nail in the coffin.

    It’s funny how these people hate Russia but love Soviet-style communism.

    Reply
    • stingray65

      I highly respect Schlaes as a historian, but during the 30s to 60s it wasn’t so clear that Communism/Socialism was a total disaster. The USSR/Cuba/N. Korea/Maoist China were closed societies and western reporters such as Walter Duranty purposely avoided reporting on Communist atrocities and failures, so it isn’t necessarily so surprising that “serious” politicians and academics in the West would support socialism or a so called third way (aka Sweden). It really wasn’t until the USSR collapsed that the rottenness of the system was fully exposed and/or became impossible to ignore, which means that anyone who advocates socialism today are absolutely unserious in terms of advocating something that will actually work (see leadership of the Democrat party and BLM, and most members of the media and academia for proof).

      Reply
      • John Van Stry

        But that’s not true. The people escaping Russia and the missionaries coming back from China were more than happy to tell you EXACTLY what life was like there.
        But we had people like Walter Cronkite running the media and they were more than happy to lie to support the commie manifesto.

        Of course I lived in NY, so running into political and other such refugees from Russian, Poland, Latvia, Cuba, China, Mongolia, East Germany, was common.

        No, Socialism has been tried thousands of times, the founders of the pilgrims at Plymouth Rock tried it and it failed for them too. It’s just that there are too many lazy and worthless F**kers who always look at that and think ‘Free Food!’ and who also believe that because they’re better than everyone else, they’ll be in charge.

        Funny how they’re always the first put up against the wall and shot for being worthless.

        Reply
        • stingray65

          You are correct John, but very few Left leaning people in Western countries will go out of their way to talk with refugees from the USSR, Cuba, China, etc., and certainly the mainstream media was never going to feature stories about their escapes from deprivation and torture. And if a Leftist really gets cornered by inconvenient facts, they can always resort to the old “the USSR/Cuba/Venezuela were not real Communism”. As for the Pilgrims, I was educated when the Pilgrims were a venerated part of US history lessons and never once did their failed experiment with socialism ever get mentioned by my patriotic teachers, and of course today’s kids only get taught about how the Pilgrims stole land from the native Americans and committed genocide by spreading disease, but never about the failed socialist experiment.

          Reply
        • yossarian

          my korean mother-in-law has spent a lot of time here in nyc with us over the years but she lives in seoul. i find her observations about her local market vs whole foods interesting.

          us meat is much cheaper. they have us meat in korea but the quality is bad. she was surprised how much better us meat is here. korean beef is excellent but it is so expensive that you only buy it occasionally.

          seafood varieties are different but seafood is much more expensive here and less variety. quality is good in both places.

          we have a bigger variety of fruit and vegetables but the quality is not very good. it seems to her that american consumers don’t buy a lot of greens and are very uneducated on how to judge quality. big fruit is not better, it’s worse. the quality of fruit and vegetables is better in korea. prices are comparable for locally grown stuff but imported fruit is very epensive in korea.

          they don’t really do bread or cheese in korea. those are specialty items.

          Reply
      • Will

        You should read the book, the exact language that was being used then is being used today. Especially among the academic class. A big thing Walter Reuther was “racial equality”.

        Reply
        • stingray65

          I suspect that Reuther defined “racial equality” as equal opportunities in education, housing, employment, etc. rather than equal outcomes in status, income, and wealth. Of course liberals of that era believed that equal opportunities would lead to more equal outcomes between races and genders, but that has not occurred much to their disappointment, which is why affirmative action, racial/gender quotas, segregated schools, and other discrimination is now advocated by the Left.

          Reply
      • Ronnie Schreiber

        Maybe things weren’t completely clear that Soviet style communism wasn’t a complete disaster, but by the 1960s Soviet leaders lived in fear of the average Russian knowing just how good life was in the West. Richard Nixon was never loved by American tastemakers but his Kitchen Debate with Nikita Khrushchev and an American display in Moscow in 1959 was a seminal event. Khrushchev had to admit that the average Russian had no access to things common in a middle class American home and bluster that eventually the USSR would catch up and surpass the USA. All three American broadcast networks ran the taped event in prime time while the Soviets ran it late at night and only translated part of Nixon’s remarks. Forty years later, when a newly installed Boris Yeltsin visited the Johnson Space Center, he and his entourage stopped at a suburban Houston grocery store. At first he couldn’t believe the store wasn’t a Potemkin (sorry) grocery, set up just for him to see, but when it was explained that such stores were common in America, that that was how American’s got their food, he told his companions that if the Russian people knew about American supermarkets, “there would be a revolution.”

        Reply
        • gtem

          It was interesting to watch the transition from the counter-service style grocery stores to the more familiar “walk around with a cart and pay up front” style throughout the 90s into the 2000s in Russia. At this point they’ve got it all, a few of the counter style setups are still around however. Perhaps the sad thing is, that on the whole, quality of most food over there (notably dairy and bread, many meats) is definitely superior to what we’ve got here, unless you pony up the big bucks for $7-a-loaf “artisanal” bakery bread, fancy grass-fed kefir, etc. Same phenomenon across most of Europe and probably most of the developing world as well.

          Reply
          • CJinSD

            Do you buy much beef? I’ve lived in other countries. In the UK, they eat cuts that aren’t suitable for humans as evidenced by mad cow disease. In the Netherlands, the only decent beef we could buy was meant to be consumed raw. I’m not suggesting that processed food from national brands isn’t proof that there’s no justification for big government, but there is no shortage of quality food in the US for people who care about the quality of their food. It may change any day now, but it has been true up until now.

          • gtem

            CJ the best meat I’ve had over there is going to the meat market where it’s cheap and fresh. The biggest difference is how the cattle and pigs are raised. As a function of things being less advanced (less automated, less optimized) most of the beef is from grass fed cattle by default. This reflects in the dairy quality as well. In the US our food is a product of our own “success” in producing a crapload of it, as efficiently, quickly, and cheaply as possible. The prevalence of dirt cheap seed oils and corn syrup in anything and everything is a prime example of the problem. The “inefficient” traditionally produced food is the pricey artisanal stuff here in the US.

          • gtem

            The simplest example I can offer up is what is considered the most basic type of everyman’s white bread: in the US it is the nasty sliced and bagged loaf, in Russia it is the classic “bukhanka” brick of white bread. The difference is centered in efficiency and scale of production and distribution. The US is truly the master of efficient mass production. One massive bread factory in the city cranks out this stuff with the consistency of cotton, packed with god knows what sort of super-processed ingredients. In Russia, generally speaking, most of that cheap white bread is baked right in the store you bought it from, or very nearby. It tastes and feels like something homemade, with a nice crust, chewy inside, it’s the type of thing you pay $6-7+ dollars for now at some hipster bakery in America. I haven’t spent much time in Europe but my understanding is that in places like France and Italy, they still have good quality simple staple type of foods like that.

          • stingray65

            Every European I have ever met in the US (except Swedes and English) complains about the lightweight white bread (the Swedes and English eat similar back home), but of course you can get specialty breads in the US that are every bit as good as anything from Europe but also pricey.

            Most beef is actually grass fed with “feedlot” beef usually just finished off with a grain and protein diet just before slaughter, but otherwise also grass fed through much of their life. The biggest difference in beef quality tends to be whether the beef comes from slaughtered dairy cattle who are past their milking days (low quality) or whether the beef comes from meat breeds of cattle, and how the beef is aged during processing. You can get fantastic beef in the US, but again you will pay a higher price for it.

          • CJinSD

            I make a point of avoiding corn syrup in just about everything. I almost always can find decent options. Aldi’s bread is quite popular in Europe. Its baked…somewhere, and then shipped frozen to their stores where it is thawed and sold as fresh.

          • Ronnie Schreiber

            I was going to rebut you but come to think of it, I don’t eat that much in the way of American white bread made in factory bakeries. Hardly any of the large bakers of white bread here in the States are under kosher supervision. I’ve never eaten Wonder Bread. If I buy bread at the grocery store it’s usually whole wheat or honey wheat.

            Friday night meals in traditional Jewish homes start with blessings over wine and two loaves of bread. Any bread will do, even matzah, but typically it’s challah, a sweet white bread similar to Greek bread. Every weel, my late grandmother baked what must have been dozens of loaves. Large ones for each of her five daughters’ families, plus smaller ones for the grandchildren. Every Friday, my mother and her sisters would trek to Bubbie’s house to get her challah, chopped liver, and gefilte fish. Her chopped liver was so good we were able to train our cat, yes a cat, to sit up and beg for it. If we got there as the challah was coming out of the oven, we’d take a small one, tear it open and eat the warm, sweet bread inside.

            My ex baked challah nearly every week.

            There’s an outstanding kosher bakery less than five minutes away, Zeman’s, where I can buy challah, kaiser rolls, seven layer cake, and what my late mother called “corn bread” (from kornbroyt – korn being an old term for rye kernels) Jewish style rye bread.

            Here’s a piece from The Atlantic about rye bread. What it doesn’t say is that the Stage deli bought (and continues to buy) their rye breads from Zeman’s.

            The best ryes, though, came from Detroit, where the process of double baking rye bread was pioneered. Back in the 1950s, a former U.S. army cook named Jack Goldberg opened up the Stage & Co. Delicatessen in Detroit and later West Bloomfield, Mich. Wanting fresh rye bread but encountering the logistical hurdle that bread delivered that morning would be cool by lunch, Goldberg devised a solution. He ordered his rye breads partially baked (about 80 percent done). Then, before the lunch rush, Goldberg placed the bread in a hot oven, finishing it off for 20 minutes. The result was a warm loaf with a thick, rustic crust on the outside. Rather than put this through a claw-like bread slicer (which cuts thin pieces of bread), Goldberg cut each hot loaf fresh to order, on a deli slicer, in pieces about an inch thick.

          • John C.

            Ronnie, it is not fair to make us all so hungry, when some of us are dieting. In my case, I was also longing for the tradition, across so many cultures of our old mothers cooking for hours with the younger family girls helping and learning in preparation for a ritual filled, eaten together dinner.

            15 years ago, a Serbian man opened a restaurant here that offered the German/central European dishes my mother used to cook with all the old fixins. Dishes like Goulash and Sauerbraten. I was in heaven but in hopes of higher profits, the Serbian man closed his restaurant and opened a new fancier one serving businessman steak lunches. It was not too big a surprise that this great chef had no talent for American style steaks. His heart was no longer in it.

        • LynnG

          Ronnie,
          They knew or the familys of merchant mariners did. In the late 1970’s I was an Assistant Manager at a Wilco Department Store on the Gulf Freeway in Houston. Once a month, we would get 35 pr 40 Russian sailors (and 3 or 4 of their watchers) come into the store and the sailors would purchase every pair of Wrangler, Levis, and Woolco branded jeans that we had in the store. Did not matter what size, brand, color just evey pair. So at least the families of these sailors knew exactly what a 120,000sqft discount store in the US looked like. It is just the citizens of the Soviet Union were powerless to do anything about it….. Remember, No right to bear arms, no right to object to the policies of the goverment…. and you wonder why the American Left is always interested in “reasonable gun control”. Reasonable only for them.

          Reply
    • stingray65

      1980 – when 20% interest rates weren’t just from credit cards and loan sharks, but also mortgages and car loans.

      Reply
      • John Van Stry

        I bought my first house in 95, and I was HAPPY for the 8 percent interest rate I got. Thought it was a STEAL.
        Now you can get 3 or lower without too much trouble.

        Reply
  15. DougD

    I’ve been wondering how those inflation numbers are generated, because here in CDN we have the same issue and inflation is not 4% or whatever they said it was in 2021. Not sure why it’s Biden/Pelosi’s fault when it’s happening in many countries. I’m sure it’s partially Justin’s fault too and I’m also sure that $650,000 is still amusingly inexpensive for a house.

    On the guitar front I did manage to sell my Takamine 12 string, to my surprise because I see a lot of 12s for sale, and I don’t see them moving. All it takes is one, thanks Oleg for not dickering on the price. That money went into a Takamine Koa GN77, which is an upgrade for my daughter which can live in a university dorm without much concern. Funny my 20 year old son is into techno swing and video game music, but 18 year old daughter is into the Beatles, Mamas and Papas, etc and was surprised to learn I’d heard of them. Unbelievable how different they are, but why raise the same kid twice?

    Reply
    • stingray65

      With global markets, if the US catches a cold, the rest of the world (especially major trade partners, close neighbors, and those also practicing Leftism) will catch double-pneumonia. It is, however, interesting to compare current inflation with the last big inflation era from the late 1960s to mid-80s. Back then the US was fighting a hot war in Vietnam and a cold war with the USSR and China, while also vastly expanding the welfare state with LBJ’s war on poverty, and enacting expensive environmental regulations. Banks followed the 3-6-3 rule: pay 3% interest on deposits, charge 6% on loans, and be on the golf course by 3 PM, and house prices tended to be fairly small multiples of salaries (my parents bought a house in 1970 for about 4 times my father’s annual teacher salary in a nice neighborhood of a rapidly growing city in flyover country). The US also became increasingly dependent on foreign sources of oil and went through some rapid rises in energy prices during the 1973-4 and 1979-80 fuel crises when the Arabs cut off supplies, while tight price controls and “expert” viewpoints that most of the oil was gone reduced incentives to drill and find oil in the US.

      Today the US has more proven oil and gas reserves than ever, but an administration that wants to keep it in the ground and instead rely on unreliable windmills and unstable foreign oil producers in OPEC and Russia. The welfare state has expanded to such an extent that despite millions of unfilled positions there is now lower labor force participation than in the late 60s when most females were still stay at home moms – never before have more able bodied people decided to not earn a living, and 67% of federal spending is transfer payments. Banks now follow the 0-3/18-24 rule where they pay 0% on deposits, charge 3% on mortgages and 18+% on credit cards, and are open online 24 hours per day. Despite a record stock market, low poverty, no major hot or cold wars, the government has more spending and debt as a % of GDP than at any point in history including WWII and the Civil War. House prices are at historic highs.

      So what are the policy options to control inflation? Drill baby drill might work if we didn’t have climate idiots controlling Congress and the White House. Raising interest rates to slow the economy might work, but with such huge deficits already the government would go broke paying interest on the debt. Higher interest rates would also cause the housing and stock market bubbles to burst, causing a huge depression at a time when the government has much less ability to bail out the economy with spending. Cutting welfare spending and vaccination mandates might encourage people to get back to work and reduce supply chain issues, but with 90% of Democrat voters terrified of Covid and happy to be paid by Uncle Sam to stay home, cutting benefits is not a choice that slow Joe is likely to consider. In other words, we are screwed.

      Reply
    • Jack Baruth Post author

      “I’m also sure that $650,000 is still amusingly inexpensive for a house.”

      The median household income in the USA is $67,500. You’d need 200k a year of income to buy a 650k house without starving in the process. Just ten percent of American households have that kind of income.

      Why does it matter? Simple. There is no compatibility between representational democracy and universal renting. At that point its nothing but people at the trough voting for more transfer payments. Furthermore, no community in history has ever been improved by adding more renters. There’s a reason that “transient” has been a euphemism for “scum” for a very long time.

      Reply
      • jc

        Renting seems to be good for the people with money running the show. The more money we owe every month the less room we have to go all Johnny Paycheck on our jobs.

        Reply
      • DougD

        I missed a point of context, average house prices in the greater Toronto area are now over a million, $1.44m by one source which makes $650k seem like a bargain.

        I think the inflation of rent is a factor that is happening behind the scenes but has not made it into the official figures. Almost everyone I know who rents is hunkered down and hoping the current trajectory changes, because if you move now your rent is going to double. Eventually more will be compelled to move for various reasons, and then you’ll see more of that effect show up in the figures.

        Reply
        • stingray65

          I believe Jack is talking $650K in the Columbus OH area for a large home in a good part of town, which is cheap by coastal US standards or Toronto or Vancouver prices in Canada. Such crazy prices is why you have Silicon Valley coders making $200K at Google who have to split rent with roommates to afford to live in a 100 year old 900 square foot bungalow. Now imagine paying such prices with a 8 or 10 or 12% interest rate mortgage – it ain’t going to be pretty.

          Reply
          • Ronnie Schreiber

            All of the places that you mentioned are adjacent to water. I bet buying a boat and renting a slip might be a realistic alternative. Even in cold weather but expensive places like Toronto or Chicago you can put a bubbler under the boat during the winter to protect it from ice. Sometimes it’s cheaper to live on a boat than on dry land.

          • stingray65

            Ronnie, yes it seems that water-front cities are where housing prices have most skyrocketed, which is amazing given that most of those cities are also dark blue politically. After all, aren’t the Democrats that people who are most worried about inequities, most supportive of low income housing, and most worried about global warming, and yet they rule and reside in cities with the biggest income inequalities, the most homelessness, and the most risk of flooding from all that glacial melting. In fact, if they truly believed in the global warming stuff, wouldn’t wealthy coastal city residents be exiting for the hills well inland and wouldn’t “soon to be flooded” coastal property be dropping in value?

          • hank chinaski

            Well deflation may come next, starting with housing with a domino effect on everything else. That’s why the Fed considerers it the absolute worst thing of all. Isn’t that how Japan went down?
            At least a portion of big urban coastal real estate is inflated by sheltered/laundered cash from China and Russia, and the rest by monetary policy. There was also a possibly temporary and reversible blip in suburban prices in several markets due to Covidian/BLM/WFH refugees.

      • Keith

        Property ownership is why America was won by the English and not the Spanish.

        Spanish tried to rule from the top down. England let people own property and a rifle to defend it, to death if need be.

        Reply
        • stingray65

          Given the millions of Spanish speaking people flooding across our open borders perhaps the ownership and rule of America will soon be changing so that we too can adopt all the fine Spanish shaped government policies and practices of our neighbors south of the border.

          Reply
  16. Daniel J

    This kind of reminds me of what happened over the summer to my house: Lightning fried a bunch of home theater equipment.

    Of course that wouldn’t be that big of a deal, but this happened just within several months major speaker, subwoofer, and home theater receiver companies had gone up 25-40 percent due to the “chip” shortage, shipping increases from China, and overall the rise and cost of goods.

    I ended up having to get a refurbished AV receiver as not much was to be found brand new. My subwoofer replacement cost 800 bucks, when just a month before that subwoofer would have been 600 dollars.

    I really don’t think raises in interest rates will force the price of goods to go down, especially commodities. It might reduce the costs of housing in several years, but it won’t do anything to make the cost of a gallon of milk.

    Reply
    • John Van Stry

      Then they need to stop voting for ‘more of the same’ because the government is driving it, all of it. The fed (fannie may, freddie mac, et al) are giving money away, for free, to the monetary funds so they can buy all the housing out there without using their own money. Which of course is driving prices through the roof, because when you’re not spending your own money, you don’t care what it takes to get that property. So what if it’ll take 40 or 50 years to pay it back?

      Reply
      • stingray65

        Greater fool theory is also driving high house prices. It doesn’t matter if you can’t afford the house if you think you can always flip it or a profit, which is possible when there are even greater fools around who are willing to pay an even more inflated price because they think they can always flip it and get their money back or more. 2008-09 put a temporary damper on that expectation, but it seems memories are short with regards to the fact that valuations that have no relationship to what people can actually afford will eventually pop.

        Reply
  17. Ronnie Schreiber

    Nobody has ever accused Joe Biden of being smart. Not that long ago, Biden said “Milton Friedman isn’t running the show anymore.” That’s too bad as it was Ronald Reagan, his economic advisor Milton Friedman, and Fed chair Paul Volker who put an end to Ford-Carter era inflation (which really started during the Vietnam War in the ’60s) by tightening the money supply. Yes, it meant a steep rise in interest rates. While my ex and I were trying to qualify for a mortgage in 1982, we watched rates go from ~10% to 13.5. Still, the policies of Reagan, Friedman, and Volker set the stage for the decades of low inflation between them and the current administration.

    I get the feeling that most of Washington D.C., particularly those currently working in the White House, are so divorced from the lives of regular folks that they genuinely think the supply chain issue is about Christmas presents.

    On my electric harmonica project I’ve been working with a local company that makes pro audio and guitar gear and have an agreement to buy some assembled circuits. Final assembly with through-hole components and mechanical parts is done for most of their products here in Michigan and they’re in the process of bringing surface-mount board assembly in-house but in the meantime they have orders to fill but are still waiting on 1,000 Asian-sourced circuit boards that were supposed to be delivered 4 months ago. They now expect them in a matter of weeks but their dealers were out of stock during the Christmas gift season.

    My cousins are plumbers and they tell me that shit flows downhill. Let’s say you’re a successful, but smallish electronics company and you need a small quantity, maybe 100 pieces, of a particular componet, maybe an IC chip, or maybe even a simple transistor or capacitor. That’s all you need for a year’s worth of production. You finally find a vendor that has 1,000 in stock but before you can pull the trigger on the order, the purchasing team at General Motors, which has also been scouring suppliers for that particular part, swoops in and buys all thousand pieces.

    So not only are there supply issues, the demand described above affects prices too. Reducing supply raises prices, as does increasing demand. Add the trillions that Washington is printing, reducing the value of cash already in circulation, and you have a triple whammy of inflation.

    Reply
      • stingray65

        Milton hadn’t yet learned that there is no such thing as a “temporary government program”. The other element that is different from today is that during WWII there were still relatively few US households that earned enough income to pay federal income taxes because they were originally aimed at only the very rich. Thus very would have been effected by withholding initially, but wartime spending emergencies, the need to pay back wartime debt, and inflationary wage increases quickly led to far more households needing to pay income taxes and having withholding taken out of their paychecks. Of in more recent time the lower end of the income distribution files taxes in order to get earned income tax credits, which is basically the negative income tax that Milton Friedman also supported.

        Reply
    • hank chinaski

      However this goes down, I’ll take ‘put on a sweater’ over ‘a winter of severe illness and death’ any day.

      Reply
    • Daniel j

      Higher interest rates aren’t going to solve this problem. Many on the left say higher interest rates will bring housing costs down. I saw it just will make it easier to allow big brokers to buy up houses to rent. Even people who can afford a house are going to say they aren’t going to pay much higher interest rates. Higher interest rates in the long run make it more expensive to own a home than even higher home prices during a hot home buying market, which much of the country is in.

      Reply
  18. -Nate

    “Intended without rancor: what’s your point?”
    His point is : he’s of age but has not yet figured out that being afraid is un American .

    -Nate

    Reply
  19. Ronnie Schreiber

    Even cheap guitars have gone up in value. The First Act VW Garagemaster guitar that I customized for you typically went for $100-$150 back then if it was in good condition. Yours cost me just $35 because the body had some damage that I removed in the customization. I got a great deal on mine for just $50 including the gig back and most of the VW swag. People are now asking $300 and more for them.

    The most I’ve spent on a Switch Vibracell was $325, and that was for a rare model. Now every Switch I see on Reverb or eBay is $500 and up.

    Reply
  20. -Nate

    FWIW, communism is B.S. and has never worked any where, ny time in world history, even marx admitted it was bunk .

    The test of the fear mongering and boot licking here is a laugh riot .

    Speaking of never getting laid…..

    -Nate

    Reply
  21. -Nate

    FWIW, communism is B.S. and has never worked any where, any time in world history, even marx admitted it was bunk .

    Socialism is not anything like communism .

    The test of the fear mongering and boot licking here is a laugh riot .

    Speaking of never getting laid…..

    -Nate

    Reply
  22. -Nate

    FWIW, communism is B.S. and has never worked any where, any time in world history, even marx admitted it was bunk .

    Socialism is not anything like communism .

    The rest of the fear mongering and boot licking here is a laugh riot .

    Speaking of never getting laid…..

    -Nate

    Reply
    • John Lock

      I’m truly baffled when people say things like this. It’s beyond ridiculous. Should we forget that what we called communism in the Cold War was referred to as International Socialism by the leaders of those countries?

      Socialism is usually described as the transitory step between capitalism and communism. “The first or lower phase of communism is called as socialism that is the phase between capitalism and communism. The second or higher phase of communism is the perfect stage.”

      Reply
  23. -Nate

    “which is why affirmative action, racial/gender quotas, segregated schools, and other discrimination is now advocated by the Left.”

    Lying as always, then trying to shift the blame instead of admitting your blatant fear and cowardice .

    You’ve leapt past scared and are now displaying that you’re terrified .

    Part of being an American is not living in fear .

    The question is why you choose to live in fear .

    BTW : the ‘fake covid’ ? in America alone it’s claimed more than 800,000 deaths in under two years, that’s more than all of WWI, four years of WWII, Korea and Vietnam combined .

    Figures don’t lie but liars sure do like to figure .

    -Nate

    Reply
        • Carmine

          Just to be clear….you’re the brave individual that saw his wheelchair bound neighbor being robbed and hid in your bullet riddled house?

          Correct?

          Way to be brave, you’re an inspiration.

          Reply
          • -Nate

            ?? Perhaps I should be like alt righties who hide behind their curtains grasping their AK47 clones ? .

            At least I stand for the American way, not hate, discontent, envy and always on the negative trying to blame others .

            I love how those who live in ivory towers are always so quick to throw stones .

            -Nate

          • Trucky McTruckface

            LOL at Nate claiming he stands against hate, negativity, and blaming others, when the guy’s got a total hard on for Stingray65 and his go-to argument for everything is that anyone who disagrees with him is a gutless, un-American liar.

            Yeah, none of us is man enough to come down to Nate’s ghetto neighborhood and fight him. What a joke. He sounds like Don Lemon when he gets drunk on the air and starts ranting about his “haters.”

          • -Nate

            As usual, I deal with reality and try to maintain a positive out look, the cowards are quick to obfuscate and shift blame, never any attempt at actual problem solving, right ? .

            I was the lone voice calling ‘defund the police’ stupid because it was .

            Keep on repeating your ‘alternate facts’ and holding your firearms clenched tight, I’ll walk the streets aware and cautious but not afraid .

            I’m no tough guy nor a keyboard cowboy like you guys .

            I believe in a free and equal America where greed and the ability ho harm others is not worshiped, just like the Constitution and Bill of rights say .

            Conservatism is serious business .

            -Nate

    • John Lock

      ““which is why affirmative action, racial/gender quotas, segregated schools, and other discrimination is now advocated by the Left.”

      Lying as always, then trying to shift the blame instead of admitting your blatant fear and cowardice .”

      Have you not paid attention to Hollywood? They are using racial quotas to determine awards, jobs and everything else. Leftism is now openly advocating separation and using race and identity in place of merits.

      https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-10391261/Hollywood-barely-whisper-wokeness-kill-industry-PETER-KIEFER-PETER-SAVODNIK.html

      Reply
      • Ronnie Schreiber

        The authors of that article never explicitly say that the BIPOC & LGBTQRSTUVWXYZ crowd is replacing Jews in Hollywood, but I thought it telling that they digress into a story about the Academy’s new museum that erases the role that Jews played in inventing the motion picture industry.

        Who do you think all those forty-something “white” comedy writers that can’t get work are?

        Reply
        • stingray65

          “Who do you think all those forty-something “white” comedy writers that can’t get work are?”

          Well according to woke-world, these now under-employed “white” comedy writers are untalented hacks who have only gotten work before because of systemic racism/sexism against more talented people of color, gender-fluid, and female writers. Of course they will suddenly become much more talented and employable when they remember to mention the family folklore about a native-American great, great grandparent and their current status as female identifying.

          Reply
        • hank chinaski

          Ha ha. ‘Maybe they’ll eat us last.’
          Learn to code, guys.

          We need to dig up those long dead inventers. The stuff they crank out today is mostly shite.

          Reply
        • John C.

          Gosh it’s like the Orientals in the Ivy League all over again, except that Ronnie is right, for better or worse, about the outsize Jewish role even in early Hollywood.

          Having the underutilized writers being personified by Gregory Peck was a nice touch by Daily Mail. Called back to when Ari Emanuel became “Jerry Mcguire” and Tom Cruise. Sarah Silverman came out against this practice calling it “jewface” She must have not known about the old days when Jewish actors played the lion share of the exotic, swarthy or Nazi roles.

          Reply
          • CJinSD

            “You can’t be kept out of an industry you invent.”

            That would constitute hate speech if you were talking about an industry invented by white Christians.

    • Daniel J

      Nate,

      He’s not lying. Is it a bit hyperbolic? Maybe. There are companies out there who are trying to make their board or high level positions more diverse, meaning, they will pass up a qualified white male to hire a woman or a POC.

      There have been stories like this coming out of companies in the last 5 years across the country.

      Is this prevalent? I have no idea. Does it happen? You bet. There are even laws:

      https://www.usnews.com/news/business/articles/2021-11-30/can-california-legally-require-women-on-corporate-boards#:~:text=The%20law%20required%20publicly%20traded,members%20must%20have%20three%20women.

      Reply
    • yossarian

      covid isn’t fake but the 800,000 number is fake. those are any covid deaths with a positive pcr test. there were literally car accident victims listed as covid deaths.

      Reply
  24. Gary

    When a Gator Les Paul holds its value, you know things are fucked.

    And Bad Monkeys are $140 now? Holy smokes. An MXR M77 is less than half that AND it looks like C3P0’s dick. That’s where the smart money goes.

    Reply
    • Ronnie Schreiber

      And Bad Monkeys are $140 now?

      Well, he has the box. There’s someone on Reverb selling a mint USA version in the box for $295.

      You can still pick up Chinese versions for $50.

      Reply
      • Gary

        Ah yes, the all important box. Can’t live without the box. Gotta save every box and all the warranty paperwork too. Keep that shit stored away and looking fresh so one day you can sell it all to some quilt-top playing dentist who needs that box and papers more than anything.

        That’s the ticket.

        Reply
        • Ronnie Schreiber

          I wonder if the pedal collectors picked that up from watch collectors, for whom the box, paperwork, and tags are important. Of course, treating a $40 plastic Danelectro pedal like it’s an Omega Speedmaster is kind of silly. The truth, though, is there’s a reason why boxes and paperwork are called ephemera when it comes to artifacts and collectibles. Fifty years from now

          I’m sure you know this, but the value of a pedal, new or vintage, has almost nothing to do with the quality of the sound. On a lot of pedals the stuffed PCB costs the manufacturer less than the housing, graphics, and mechanical parts like switches and jacks.

          I’ve been working on a higher end model of the Harmonicaster, this one with a preamp and noise control. For the preamp I’m using a slightly simplified version of the Friedman Buxom Boost pedal’s circuit. That pedal retails for $169. In small quantities I’m paying a little more than $20 for the stuffed PCB.

          One of my favorite pedals is the Lovepedal Champ. It has one transistor, six capacitors, and I think eight resistors.

          I’m not sure that I can hear the difference between my EHX Soul Food, Wampler Tumnus, or Vntage Tone Prometheus. They’re all clones of the Klon and they all sound just fine. Has that knowledge stopped me from getting on the waiting list now that Bill Finnegan has restarted production of his own clone, the KTR? Of course not, even though I’m pretty sure it won’t sound much different than those others.

          Reply
          • Ronnie Schreiber

            Hit the wrong button. Fifty years from now, it will be much harder to get the box and paperwork than it will to get the pedal.

  25. Crancast

    Jack, the other contributors, and commenters,

    Thank you for a nice thoughtful diversion here at RG in 2021. Even though I do not comment much, the reads were good/great and comments even better at times. Hopefully the rest of the world wises up in 2022, well we can hope right.

    On the open-source EV, we are really there already. Outside of Tesla, every other EV on sale is a commoditized parts bin of batteries, motors, and controllers with whatever else the given manufacture has in their catalog. Funky door handles, frunks, and sheet metal artistry is about all any established manufacturer is bringing to the table. Easily do-able, if only some organization wanted to do it and the suppliers of those commodities willingly participated. Who could that organization be? Enthusiasts – not enough power and influence. Beyond unlikely, but I enjoy the thought of the large dealer conglomerates banding together to sell parts direct in an EV open-source world. They would ruin part of Jack’s premise, but they would have the influence and pathway to pull it off while also making a buck and being big enough to standup against the manufacturers. Otherwise, what org are you pitching to tackle this out of the goodness of their hearts?

    Reply
    • Jack Baruth Post author

      Your idea of a dealer group getting involved is a good one. The three biggest groups all have a bigger reach than any individual automaker. They could house-brand them.

      Reply
  26. Trucky McTruckface

    Your experience is pretty much why I lost interest in browsing guitar shops a number of years ago. 95% of the new gear was Mexican/Chinese Fenders/Epiphones, and the used gear was always trash. Maybe there’d be one Gibson LP on the wall that wasn’t a Studio or some gimmicky “Traditional Pro” piece of crap, and a few American-made Strats/Teles.

    I went on a guitar buying binge around the same time you got that BFG. Nothing particularly special, but browsing Reverb, it looks like I’d at least break even on all of them. That’s ridiculous. Even more ridiculous is that the Mexican Strat I’ve had for 20 years could fetch up to $600.

    But most ridiculous of all is that the two year old vehicle in my garage, which should have depreciated by an amount roughly equivalent to taking a new Honda Civic LX and lighting it on fire, is currently worth about what I paid for it brand new.

    The temptation to liquidate it all is strong. Too bad that in this clown show economy, everything one could dump the proceeds into is just as overinflated.

    Reply
    • Jeff Winkelhake

      True that! I have a couple American “Big Two” guitars that I got good deals on that I like and probably would never sell. Bought an “Asian made” semi hollow from a big name manufacturer brand new for a very good price when the CoCoV hit and now the very few I see for sale are asking twice what I paid. If I could move it maybe I could put it towards the just released 20k Terry Kath Custom Shop Tele.

      Reply
    • Jack Baruth Post author

      Exactly. So you come up with a hundred K of mad money. What can you buy with it that doesn’t feel like you’re being taken for a ride and then some?

      Reply
  27. goose

    I always wondered about the back story on Hendrix’s painted strat: he must have painted it at Monterey, over the weekend? And did he spray half of it white, too? was it a donor body/salvaged build from one of his previous smashups? Did he have any previous smashups?

    Odd that he played a black strat for the whole set but switched to that one on the final song. They were probably worth the same amount of money. I wonder why he didn’t just use the painted one for the entire set.

    Reply
    • John Van Stry

      The one he burned was a cheaper one, the one he played for all of the previous parts of the show was his favorite.
      That’s why he changed. He wasn’t going to get rid of his favorite guitar.

      Reply
  28. goose

    But they weren’t making any mexican or indonesian strats back then. And Fender hadn’t diluted their product line with a million variations on the same instrument.

    Maybe it was “just” an old ’54 or ’57 strat, vs his nice new ’66 strat?

    Reply
  29. gtem

    Ford’s crate-EV engine is perhaps a start, although that F100 concept they put together is horrid. Jack you’ve mentioned the idea before, a full tilt 70s luxo-barge sized EV would be just the ticket. No one really buys a cushy landyacht to listen to the exhaust as they run through the gears, in fact the best of them were all about smooth silent torque off idle and an imperceptibly shifting automatic transmission. So give me a mid 70s Electra 225 with an EV conversion so I can daily drive it without dealing with 8-10mpg.

    Reply
    • stingray65

      Mid-60s Electra would be better than mid-70s, nicer looking and much nicer interior. 60s Continentals, T-Birds, and Caddies would also be good EV candidates.

      Reply
      • gtem

        I don’t disagree, but for me the sheer mass and over the top 70s excess, and overall styling of the car, the 74-75 front end in particular of the Electra 225 is where its at. But any big 60s-late 70s boat will do, GM/Ford/Mopar, I like them all.

        Reply
        • John C.

          Turning the Electra electric might seem to counteract the 70s excess (or is it properly proportioned for successful 70s man?) though. Like those Europeans that run big engine classics on natural gas.

          I thought the 70s F100 going electric was just trying to troll the old guys. Like Superman going gay in the new comic book.

          Reply
  30. -Nate

    “Most beef is actually grass fed”

    Proving yet again that you have no idea what you’re talking about . go some time and get cow poop on your boots, it’s very educational .

    Myself, I like the range beef from wild or older cattle, far less fat content .

    “but many of us are not grateful enough for these advances because we are ignorant of history.”

    Looking at _you_ sir .

    “American Left is always interested in “reasonable gun control”. Reasonable only for them.”

    Wrong and a lie to boot ~ gun control means safety and close grouping , it also means the idiot bubba who grabs a firearm and says ‘hold muh beer an’ watch _THIS_ !’ -needs- to be controlled, not those who understand firearms are just tools, not things to make you look tough .

    When you act like children you should expect to be treated as same .

    This is why the many young men I have raised up are all hard working, serious and Conservative, not whackos .

    -Nate

    Reply
    • stingray65

      Educate yourself Nate. I’m pretty sure I’ve spent a lot more time on a farm and working in Agri-business than you have.

      Reply
      • -Nate

        Apparently not .

        I notice you neglected to mention how most of the cows that died of mad cow disease some years back, were ground up, processed and added to the feed mix used in commercial beef ranches .

        Do not fear the truth and facts sri .

        -Nate

        Reply
  31. -Nate

    “with some of the clubs I run with being ~50% millenial membership. ”

    This is very good to hear .

    I keep hearing about millenials who don’t want to own things, learn more or expand their horizons, you give me hope .

    When this boomer dies off, please just shove all my old crap into the landfill or recycling plant .

    -Nate

    Reply
    • Daniel J

      The problem with generational terms is that they cover a broad range of ages. Wiki defines 1981 – 1996. This is 24-40 year olds. Most 35 – 40 year olds I know want to own homes. I know many mid to late 20 somethings don’t want to own mostly due to the responsibility of upkeep. Then again, most of them don’t want to drive either or own a car. What I find more interesting is that I know some early Gen Z’ers who are more interested in owning homes than late millennials.

      Reply
  32. -Nate

    Since you insisted :

    donald trump : liar, grifter, con man, seditionist who divided America and was openly racist and tried mightily to overthrow the United States Of America’s duly elected government ~ them’s the facts, Jack, not some bullshit alt-right smear campaign with not one shred of proof .

    Even the gop says the election was honest and fair .

    I have a hard on for anyone who lies or is openly racist .

    I never begin the off topic and dishonest political rants, you do then go all snowflake when anyone else points out the truth .

    -Nate

    Reply
    • stingray65

      Nate, for your own good its time to lay off the booze, weed, or LSD, because you are obviously delusional. Perhaps you need to get away from the land of fruits and nuts.

      Reply
    • John Lock

      It’s really hard to tell who starts it when it is a repeating loop. I never let my kids use that excuse…..

      Like they say: it takes two to tango….

      Btw, how was trump openly racist? I mean if you compare the things Joe Biden says to BIPOC vs Trump it’s kinda like “whoa buddy”…..but I guess if you have the entire media apparatus supporting you it doesn’t become a big deal when Biden says things like:

      May 2020, Biden infamously asserted to the largely black audience that if they were unsure of whether to vote for him or Trump, then “you ain’t black!” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rcpqowmmyNI

      Then in August 2020, Biden told a gathering of black and Hispanic journalists that “unlike the African American community, with notable exceptions, the Latino community is an incredibly diverse community with incredibly different attitudes about different things.” https://www.nationalreview.com/news/biden-tells-interviewer-that-unlike-the-african-american-community-latino-community-is-diverse/

      In 2010, he warmly eulogized Sen. Robert Byrd, a former Exalted Cyclops in the Ku Klux Klan, saying he was “one of my mentors” and that “the Senate is a lesser place for his going.” https://obamawhitehouse.archives.gov/realitycheck/the-press-office/remarks-president-and-vice-president-a-memorial-service-senator-robert-c-byrd

      In 2007, he referred to Barack Obama as “the first mainstream African-American who is articulate and bright and clean.” https://www.cnn.com/2007/POLITICS/01/31/biden.obama/

      In 2006, he said, “You cannot go to a 7-Eleven or a Dunkin’ Donuts unless you have a slight Indian accent.” https://www.cbsnews.com/news/bidens-comments-ruffle-feathers/

      But please keep repeating the mantra that Trump is racist and the one that divided the country not the people that benefit by ensuring that people are divided by racial and ideological lines instead of forming together to fight against the wealthy elite that do everything to destroy the lower & middle class to ensure their enrichment.

      Reply
      • John C.

        Mr. Lock, I agree with a lot of what you write, but this silly Democrats are the real racists stuff is a terrible pose for Republicans. It concedes the very major point that it is okay to avoid dealing with issues by shouting RACIST! All that stuff Biden said has a large element of truth and just because you hope it might offend his supporters, you waste time on it. Biden has enacted terrible policies and proposes more. His family grifting is also a legitimate issue. With such a target rich environment, why waste limited ammunition. A real racist wouldn’t be willing to be the warm bucket of piss next to a blackish President.

        Reply
      • Carmine

        I also like how he calls Trump a liar, when Senile Joe claims to be having conversations with Amtrack conductors that died 7 years before he became VP while at the same time lying about the miles he actually rode on Amtrack…..or how he convinced Senator Strom Thurmond to vote for a bill 6 years after Thurmond was dead….or how he claims to have been arrested trying to see Nelson Mandella….also complete bullshit that didn’t happen…..Brandon is possibly the most full of shit person the deep state has ever installed as pretend president…..

        These are only 2 examples out of DOZENS that are out there that show he is not able to tell the truth about anything…..

        Reply
  33. -Nate

    Once again faced with the ugly truth some choose to lie and attack .

    I don’t do drugs and I stopped smoking when I was 24 not that you’d care .

    Even the gop now admits everything I said about djt is true .

    -Nate

    Reply
  34. -Nate

    At least I’m not a racist lying fool like you .

    I’m sure there’s a picture of you next to “snowflake” in the encyclopedia .

    No one is forced to live here, many more are envious and find the need to attack Ca. because they can’t make it here .

    If you’d simply stop inserting politics into everything there would be no problem .

    I’m sad your parents didn’t love you enough to teach you manners .

    -Nate

    Reply
  35. -Nate

    Thanx ronnie ;

    I _really_ like bread and don’t know of any Jewish bakeries here, plenty of Centro – American ones but that’s very different .

    I don’t like sugared breads .

    -Nate

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.