Resist! For #laborsavings

The e-mail said,

Meetup has always served as an organizing platform for a wide range of political views, welcoming everyone from the Howard Deaniacs to the Tea Party. Meetup will always welcome people with different beliefs.
.
But after the recent executive order aimed to block people on the
basis of nationality and religion, a line was crossed. At a time when core democratic ideals feel under attack, we feel a duty to spark more civic participation.
.
Last week, we created 1,000+ #Resist Meetup Groups to act as local hubs for actions on behalf of democracy, equality, human rights, social justice, and sustainability. Already 50,000+ people have joined.

I trust that most of my readers are too intelligent, or at least too cynical, to swallow that tripe at face value. What’s really going on?


Meetup, the company, just filed for more H1Bs than it’s requested in the entire history of the H1-B program. Seven, to be exact, paying an average of $122k a year. That’s close to a million dollars a year that will be mostly remitted out of this country. Now, it’s fair to say that a million bucks isn’t much in terms of corporate budgets. But it’s still a million dollars a year. It represents enough earning power to feed twenty American families very well.

While it’s touching to think that Meetup is deeply vested in the rights of Somalis to travel to the United States, it seems far more likely that they are just hoping to prevent Mr. Trump from getting enough momentum in his administration to eliminate, or drastically revise, the labor policies that are keeping high-skilled white-collar American citizens out of a job. This is corporate activism in perfect synecdoche: a focus on the bottom line dressed up with some marketing-speak to warm the hearts of dipshits with masters’ degrees in feminist basket-weaving.

This would be a good time to remind the reader that Mr. Obama’s program of drone strikes killed hundreds of civilians, some of whom were children. Why didn’t Meetup #Resist the murder of children? There’s only one answer that makes logical sense: those children didn’t have any economic value. It’s a sobering thought. And it suggests that you can pretty much draw a direct correlation between corporate virtue-bleating and the potential impact of Trump policies on the bottom lines of those bleating corporations.

I’m reminded of something that the old hands at my Ford dealership used to say about gay customers. “There are two kinds of (epithet)s who come to the dealership,” the phrase went. “The ones that can’t get bought on a used car, and the ones who can afford anything they want. We call the first group (epithet)s. We call the second group… valued customers.”

42 Replies to “Resist! For #laborsavings”

  1. yamahog

    Corporations get such a free ride on immigration virtue signaling – I admire the ruse.

    Though I think Donald Trump is showing us that having a white Republican man in the oval office is a good thing for the Constitutional Republic because it encourages people to be critical of the government and care about checks, balances, and the separation of powers.

    Reply
  2. ltcftc

    Jack, I looked for how e-mail this to you, but couldn’t find an e-mail address for you.

    This guy goes hunting for late model 911s using his 993 Carrera 4, and early 200kW model with performance enhanced thanks to a G64/21 close ratio gearbox and a drastic weight reduction (including plastic windows) down to just 1200kg, a drop of around 200kg

    https://youtu.be/JrK1oeRjFhU

    Reply
  3. Bigtruckseriesreview

    This country is so uneducated, STUPID and polarized, the only solution is making a law that says a presidential candidate must be a GOVERNOR before running for the presidency.

    That will completely kill the “popular vote” nonsense where uninformed, misinformed voters choose celebrity status.

    Now: every president would be thoroughly vetted and have a record we can see and scrutinize, rather than pop up nobodies who come out of nowhere and have no real accomplishments.

    Reply
    • Don Curton

      While I don’t disagree (I might add that a 4-star general or equivalent would also suffice), any change to the requirements for president would need a constitutional amendment.

      Reply
    • rickky truktt

      it’s polorized because the democrats have been bringing millions of people into this country for decades who don’t and won’t share our values. Millions who use the welfare system, work for cash and send billions of cash out of our country essentially dragging our economy down. I see ads all the time, especially during Christmas saying to spend locally as that money will turn over in the local economy several times, helping the local economy. sending money to Mexico or wherever does the reverse. sanctuary cities get money from the federal govt, get more voting power from the census getting illegals counted.

      Reply
      • Bigtruckseriesreview

        As a Black male who is a registered Republican and wealthy, let me be first to say that I agree:

        The immigrants coming here are doing their best to change America rather than assimilate to it. I have no loyalty to them (any of them) and my recommendation is the swiftest way to stop them is to END THE WELFARE STATE.

        My tax dollars are better spent on HELLCATS and TRACKHAWKS.

        America only has 322 Million (tops) but there are more than 5 billion living in poverty.

        YOU CAN’T BRING EM ALL HERE.

        YOU CAN’T SAVE THEM ALL.

        So why punish taxpayers by shuttling them in and handing them welfare checks?

        President Trump is doing EXACTLY what I wanted him to do.

        Reply
    • Disinterested-Observer

      I could not disagree more. I think any political office should be like jury duty. Open the mailbox, “Aw crap, I gotta be president.” As Douglas Adams said, anyone who wants to rule should not be allowed to.

      Reply
    • Rock36

      That briefs well, but there are a lot of second order and third order effects on the system that. It operates on the premise that you would have a smaller but more qualified field, but is founded on a questionable assumption that governorship is a reliable indicator of Presidential skill.

      http://governors.rutgers.edu/on-governors/us-governors/governors-and-the-white-house/governors-who-became-president/

      Some arguably good Presidents arent on this list and some bad ones are. The opposite is true as well, and this is mostly independent of political leaning as well. You would just pick your liberal/conservative Presidential heroes that are present/not present on that list accordingly.

      Every person running for President has a list of accomplishments, whether you value those accomplishments or not is a different story. Besides, if no one is paying attention or they are all stupid, as you argue, what makes you think they would suddenly start logically and impartially evaluating a candidates record as governor?

      Now persoanlly I think we should repal the 17th amendment. I find value in the concept that Senators represent state legislatures at the federal level, and not be another direct representative of the people. But thats just, like, my opinion man.

      Reply
      • Cdotson

        “I find value in the concept that Senators represent state legislatures at the federal level, and not be another direct representative of the people. But thats just, like, my opinion man.”

        Yours, mine, and the opinion of 89% of the framers of the Constitution. Begone with proto-progressivist constitutional tinkering.

        Reply
    • Kevin Jaeger

      We’re seeing the deep state and their clients fighting back. When Trump promised to drain the swamp everyone had to know that swamp was full of alligators that are quite determined to resist its drainage.

      I wish Trump well in his efforts but I think his chances of success are quite limited.

      Reply
  4. Don Curton

    “This would be a good time to remind the reader that Mr. Obama’s program of drone strikes killed hundreds of civilians”

    When Trump was questioned about Putin having killed people, I wanted to scream at the TV that Obama killed people too! But no liberal media type wanted to play that up. Or that Clinton started a bombing campaign when the Lewinsky hearings were going on. But no, everyone got all upset when Trump said that we aren’t so innocent either.

    Reply
    • Domestic Hearse

      I commend you for deciphering Clinton’s motivations for his actions. Now I challenge you to similarly ponder the motivations behind Trump’s words.

      Reply
  5. Rob

    “But after the recent executive order aimed to block people on the
    basis of nationality and religion…” Umm, no. Not based on religion. But that’s how the world works now; you get to just make shit up. This is how the debate on Illegal Immigration turned into a debate on just plain Immigration. This is how two-time Obama voters magically become Racists when they vote for the old white guy instead of the old white lady.

    Reply
    • Disinterested-Observer

      f’ing mainstream media types literally said that it was racist that her majesty didn’t get elected because it was a rejection of his legacy. Dude got elected then reelected, she is a piece of shit.

      Reply
  6. WhiskeyRiver

    My thought on walls, bans and extreme vetting:

    Heaven has a wall, bans people, and, engages in extreme vetting. People are still dying to get there.

    H-1B’s may be a necessary evil for the time being. Can you imagine the products of Common-Core math programming your mainframe?

    Reply
    • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

      My son goes to a common core school. He’s seven. Last night he told me what 208 x 47 was without a paper or pen. Maybe it’s just working for him?

      Reply
      • Ronnie Schreiber

        John is exceptionally bright, empahsis on exception.

        I’m not a fan of educational fads. Phonics and memorizing multiplication tables were how the people who made the real technical breakthroughs of the 1950s and 1960s that we now benefit from learned. I had to teach my younger daughter the basics of algebra because her teacher was just confusing her with the “manipulatives” she had to bring home and use. It took us a while to convince the teacher that knowing how to solve for X in 4X=8 was more important than fiddling with some pieces of plastic.

        Reply
        • MrGreenMan

          Ronnie, your daughter’s teacher was part of the 90% that Fred Reed used to describe as “fit for only farm or factory work.”

          Her teacher is fascinated with the manipulatives because her teacher is a mid wit (at best in the 105 IQ range; smart enough to be verbal for a teaching job) who thinks everyone has the same difficult of understanding that her teacher does. It’s the mark of that kind of person who thinks, because she is smarter than the person who sells her coffee, then if something is hard for her to understand, it’s a problem with the subject matter, not herself.

          Reply
        • Kvndoom

          OMFG, they weren’t using the red, yellow, and blue blocks were they? Please please PLEASE tell me they weren’t using the blocks!

          I saw a demonstration of that several years ago and couldn’t believe my eyes.

          Reply
      • Ark-med

        I think common core is useful for kids into whose brains the basics get hard-coded more quickly and indelibly. That innate (or developed?) intellect allows them to see the connections that common core is trying to get all kids to see, regardless of average kids’ ability to instantly internalize basic concepts.

        As people grow, their accumulated experience in everyday transactions allow them to intuit, “manipulate” and “hack” better to arrive at answers. Teachers to whom this epiphany occurs, in their solipsism not realizing this might be a product of experience, apply the idea to generate novel teaching practices for the sake of novelty and peer accolades. These theories may have limited success in the avg. inexperienced child’s mind: maybe a more apt methodology for an AP class?

        Jack’s kid, John, benefits from genetic intellect as well as a buttload (the technical term for high-frequency) physical- and mental-dexterity-improving activity along with perseverance, such as Lego, BMX and karting, which might well help in heuristics development.

        Reply
        • Ark-med

          “Jack’s kid, John, benefits from genetic intellect as well as a buttload (the technical term for high-frequency) physical- and mental-dexterity-improving activity along with perseverance, such as Lego, BMX and karting, which might well help in heuristics development.”
          We call this “bright”.

          Reply
          • Jack BaruthJack Baruth Post author

            Plus he has a helicopter parent — even if I’m more “Riptide” than “Blue Thunder”

          • Kevin Jaeger

            Bright kids will learn in spite of the dumbing down of the modern schools. It’s the less bright kids that benefit from proper instruction. In a proper school they will at least learn to read and do basic arithmetic if they’re actually taught.

            That modern schools are quite content to graduate so many illiterates is a major scandal and someone should be held accountable for it.

    • Yamahog

      H-1B is not a necessary evil, go talk to young people who challenge themselves and you’ll see we have plenty of brain power – just that people with brain power can read Glassdoor reviews as well as anyone else and correctly perceive that FIRE jobs pay at least as well as STEM jobs and FIRE jobs are objectively easier and definitely enjoy higher salaries at the mid-career level.

      In many places, a financial analyst or accountant will command the salary of an engineer with a master’s degree and a junior financial analyst or accountant is more likely to wield power over an engineer than vice versa.

      Besides, kids who would have excelled with traditional school will excel in common core and most people only learn how to navigate bureaucracy in high school / prerequisites for things that matter: college level material.

      Reply
      • rwb

        “FIRE jobs pay at least as well as STEM jobs and FIRE jobs are objectively easier and definitely enjoy higher salaries at the mid-career level”

        Be that as it may, STEM encompasses a wider range of vocations, many of which may be easier to enter at the bottom than FIRE industries.

        Reply
  7. mas

    “””Meetup, the company, just filed for more H1Bs than it’s requested in the entire history of the H1-B program. Seven, to be exact, paying an average of $122k a year. That’s close to a million dollars a year that will be mostly remitted out of this country. Now, it’s fair to say that a million bucks isn’t much in terms of corporate budgets. But it’s still a million dollars a year. “””

    You know that is before taxes, no? If NYC cost of living (rents, specially) is anything close to what San Francisco Bay Area is, you end up not saving a lot in order to send it back.

    Reply
  8. Wulfgar

    I’m currently restoring my 1974 Honda CB400F Super Sport. Y’all let me know when you get this worked out……..

    Reply

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