8 Replies to “1962-63 Oldsmobile Jetfire: With Turbo Rocket Fluid!”

  1. AvatarMike

    1962: “Turbo Rocket Fluid”
    2019: “DEF”

    We were collectively smoking some waaaay better shit back in the 60’s.

    Reply
  2. AvatarJohn C.

    In the early sixties in both England and the USA there was a class of up and coming college educated executives who wanted new, more sensible and innovative cars that still had some measure of the tradition of their fathers and grandfathers. Olds offered this and Rover offered the P6 2000. In both cases the small engine was probably not up for the weight of the car over the long term. So starting the tradition of lease specials. Olds fixed it by upsizing enough to use their more stout Olds V8 and Rover solved it by buying the aluminum 3.5 V8 from Buick where it did better in their lighter cars. In doing so, both expanded their potential market beyond early adopters. There is though something about the trim originals with all their innovation and achieving young buyers. Thanks Tom and Tony.

    Reply
  3. AvatarCarmine

    I always find it odd when an author has to take a dig on a cars handling when he has never driven one……

    This guy does it twice? Bad handling? Compared to what? And declared by whom?

    Otherwise its just gibberish dragging out the old standard and tired “American cars can handle durh durh duhur”

    Reply
  4. Avatar-Nate

    As an Old Man I find this car pleasing to the eye .

    It looks like the Pontiac Tempest body ? .

    Turbochargers are nifty, I have one in two of my old Mercedes W123 Diesels, they haul ass and don’t notice hills, giving good (for vintage vehicles) fuel economy whilst doing so .

    -Nate

    Reply
  5. AvatarJMcG

    Turbo Rocket Fluid seems identical to MW50. That’s what the Germans used to inject into their aircraft engines to let them run at higher boost and keep up with allied aircraft performance late in the war.
    There’s a guy on the YT that has a channel called Greg’s Airplanes and Autos. He has the best explanations of WW2 engine supercharging and turbocharging I’ve ever seen. Sorry to mention another site on here, please delete if that’s improper.

    Reply
  6. AvataraircooledTOM

    I run a meth/water injection system on my WRX. Remarkable cooling properties. My intake manifold gets down to 40 or 50 degrees below atmospheric. WAYYY below what it would be without the “boost juice.” It does run out quickly if you’re driving a little angrily. My reservoir is like 2.5 gal. I can get it to run longer if I drive like an old lady and keep the car completely out of the boost.

    Regardless, beautiful old car. I love seeing classic stuff that does the same thing that my play car does.

    Reply

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