Cadillac Candy: 1966 Fleetwood Series 75 Sedan

Fellow Cadillac fancier and photographic contributor to this fine website, Jayson Coombes, alerted me this weekend to a most excellent example of 1966 Cadillac he spotted online. This gorgeous Fleetwood Series 75 Formal Sedan, painted in Nocturne Blue, if my estimations are correct.

1966 Fleetwood

It was originally listed on this website. A true time capsule, with a mere 15,000 miles on the clock. From the pictures, I believe it. Sadly, she’s since been sold, hopefully to a happy new owner. Anyway, I eagerly scrolled through the pictures. Said photos are very well done. I love it when a photographer knows what he’s doing. So many times, too many times, that is not the case.

1966 Fleetwood

So many horrible craigslist and ebay ads have led me to keep my expectations low. Honestly, does NO ONE realize you can turn your cell phone sideways and get the whole frickin’ car in the frame?! But never mind. These pictures are the opposite of those terrible CL, et al, sale photos.

1966 Fleetwood

And 1966 was a very good year for Cadillacs. I plan on doing a more comprehensive post on the ’66 Cadillacs at some point in the future, but today, just enjoy the pictures, and remember when Cadillac was truly the Standard of the World. Nothing but photos of classic Cadillac style to follow, but trust me, you’ll enjoy them. My hat’s off to the photographer for Pedigree Motorcars, at any rate. Well done!

1966 Fleetwood

1966 Fleetwood

1966 Fleetwood

1966 Fleetwood

1966 Fleetwood

1966 Fleetwood

1966 Fleetwood

1966 Fleetwood

1966 Fleetwood

1966 Fleetwood

1966 Fleetwood

1966 Fleetwood

1966 Fleetwood

1966 Fleetwood

1966 Fleetwood

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J9Lx7chd5X8

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J9Lx7chd5X8

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J9Lx7chd5X8

OK, OK, one final word: Gaw-juss!

16 Replies to “Cadillac Candy: 1966 Fleetwood Series 75 Sedan”

  1. John C.

    If we only had people today worthy of riding in the back of this. If I were the dealer, I would have researched and had something written up on the first owner. It would have been an inspiration to the cars current protector. This car deserves more than being used up as a wedding car.

    Reply
      • John C.

        Thanks for having me read further. A lot of on the road celebrities were chauffeured between gigs in the 50s and 60s. It was the death of a few of them Patsy Cline, Hank Williams, and Jayne Mansfield, the last in a Buick. Suspect more than a few of these Fleetwood 75 went new to corporate motor pools for the CEO. Now days the empty suit CEO gets around in outsourced black sedans. One perk successfully gone after,

        Now they even have remade “Driving Miss Daisy” with Jessica Tandy switched out for Mr. Bojangles and her dignified driver/friend servant for a white guy. Mr. Bo has all the dignity in the new one and the car became a newer Buick, reflecting the dropping a class or two in the new movie.

        Reply
        • Rande Bell

          Are you thinking of the 2018 film ‘Green Book’, with a ’62 Cadillac Sedan deVille, and starring Mahershala Ali as a concert pianist and Viggo Mortensen as his driver and ertsatz bodyguard for a southern state concert tour? If so, I could see why you linked the two films, but ‘Green Book’ is a different theme and not a refreshed ‘Driving Miss Daisy’.

          Reply
  2. Carmine

    Its not even a limousine, its a Formal Sedan without the divider, these were interesting, sort of the last 7 passenger “touring sedan” in the sense of the big sedans from the 30’s. Without knowing the history of ownership I would have assumed that this was a funeral home limo due to the fairly low options, I think air conditioning was standard on these but it doesn’t have the rear radio, which also made me think funeral home limo(don’t want Timmy cranking Satisfaction on the way to plant Grandma at Forest Lawn).

    Very well kept, the Fleetwood 75 Formal Sedan and Limousine were really cool cars, the last factory built long wheelbase 7 passenger cars.

    Reply
  3. -Nate

    Drooling over this car .

    Back when a Fleetwood was a fine car, not a base model like my 1980 Fleetwood hearse conversion is .

    I wish there were still any ’53 ~ ’56 Caddy limos left that you could write up, I spent a lot of time in them during the 1960’s and have fond memories .

    -Nate

    Reply
    • Carmine

      The commercial chassis was always pretty stripped, your 1980 at least probably has power windows and locks, the 1976 and down commercial chassis cars were crank window, its not strange to see a commercial chassis car with a radio delete plate and even some pre 1974 ones without air conditioning.

      Yours at least has the full Cadillac door panels, the earlier hearse and ambulance Cadillacs have flat vinyl panels that were supplied by the body builder. Commercial Chassis cars were low option because they weren’t intended to be used as “luxury cars” they were professional vehicles for serious use. If you go back before 1953, you’ll find manual transmission commercial chassis cars.

      Reply
      • Joe Masters

        The formal sedan (and the imperial sedan, for that matter) were not commercial chassis vehicles, at least, not according to all the literature I found during the research on my 1958 Fleetwood formal sedan. The commercial chassis was just a bit longer and delivered without a body aft of the windshield. “…it is not strange to see a commercial chassis car with a radio delete plate…” What is really strange is to see a commercial chassis car, if such a thing exists.

        Reply
        • Carmine

          I’m not sure what your point is or what you’re trying to correct me on.

          I used the term “commercial chassis car” as a blanket statemetnt referring to Cadillacs that were sold for conversion to either a hearse or ambulance. The original poster was referring to his 1980 Cadillac hearse and complaining that it was stripped for a “Fleetwood”. i was informing him that most if not all commercial chassis cars were pretty stripped as they were not sold as luxury cars, but as a professional vehicle, I would also like to add to my first post, the his hearse isn’t a Fleetwood either way, even though it does carry the wreath and crest like a Fleetwood series cars, commercial chassis cars really don’t have model designation other than “commercial chassis”.

          I never referred to the Fleetwood Limousine or Formal Sedan as commercial chassis cars. The commercial chassis was made as a bare long wheelbase chassis from the cowl back, the rear tail lights, bumpers and other parts were shipped in wooden crate strapped to the frame.

          Reply
  4. stingray65

    The last year of true Cadillac quality – look at all the real wood and real stainless steel trim. The next year it all became plastic and much more generic. Some will say it was because of safety standards, but the real reason was to cut costs. My parents had a 66 Sedan deVille and it was beautifully and durably built, but 11-12 mpg at 70 mph increased to only 13 when 55 mph was mandated by Nixon.

    Reply
    • John C.

      Really doubt there was much savings making the change. Remember the MGB that year that had it’s high quality dash covered with soft foam rubber to make sure it stayed sellable.

      Reply

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