16 Replies to “1966 Chrysler Windsor: The Best Bad Decision I Ever Made!”

  1. AvatarJon

    Nice write-up, I enjoyed it. Good luck with the restoration.

    Do you think anyone will be able to rebuild today’s cars 50-odd years from now in the same way?

    Reply
  2. AvatarDanio3834

    It’s great to see old drivers get some love. Particularly old Mopars for which I’ve had a few. My current old driver is a ’63 Thunderbird and this reminds me that I’ve got a few things to fix and put some more miles on it.

    Reply
  3. AvatarJohn C.

    I wonder why restorations of cars like this always come with a big performance upgrade. No doubt the 383 is capable of far more than 270 gross horsepower, but lets face it, that is plenty of power for this type of car. In adding the power, you are making the car loud perhaps to the point of making a spectacle of yourself driving it. This is the direct opposite of what Chrysler intended. There was a reason for the 2 barrel and relaxed gearing with the big engine. It could be relaxed in a way lesser cars couldn’t. This then reflected the taste and discretion of the owner. I know not modern, but if you wanted modern with an old pastiche, Dodge will sell you a Canadian assembled Challenger.

    Reply
    • Avatararbuckle

      “I wonder why restorations of cars like this always come with a big performance upgrade.”

      Probably because buying an actual “performance” optioned car from this era tends to require a lot more up front money. I doubt he could have picked up a ’66 440TNT, 3.23 Sport 300 for $1600.

      Reply
    • AvatarDanio

      Cars of this era are a lot slower than the advertised horsepower might suggest. Most owners like a little performance to go with their terrible fuel mileage. The performance upgrades don’t have to be obnoxious though. A subtle choice in mufflers can make for a speedy-quiet ride.

      Reply
      • AvatarJohn C.

        Automobile-catalog.com had Mike’s engine, axle ratio in a probably slightly heavier 66 Newport (4120 pounds). 9.2 seconds to 60 with a 119 mph top speed. The 29 mph/1000 rpm top gear with the big engine would have seemed pretty relaxed at 2400rpm at 70mph right at the engines ample torque peak. The four barrel option at 325 gross horsepower got to 7.6 seconds to 60 assuming that guy’s logarithm properly takes into account period tire traction. Mike’s description sounded like far more than a 4 barrel conversion and you can see his tires are filling the wheel wells much more than the black and white ad shot of the stock car.

        Reply
    • AvatarStephen

      Because we can.

      I have a Ford 5.0 pushrod motor that I going to redo the bottom end on. Probably less than 500 extra will get me a 331 stroker motor.

      Of course, we always forget that with extra power comes more heat, and broken parts.

      –Stephen

      Reply
      • AvatarJohn C.

        Of course you can, the question is if you should? This Chrysler for example came on 14 inch wheels. It was part of the long and low look so alien today. When Mike has the Windsor back together with what 400? rumbling horsepower, he will have to put modern circa 18 inch wheels on it to possibly launch from a stoplight. Now it is not only stupidly loud, but donked, and arguably spitting at the style of the first owner. Maybe Nick Nolte pulls that off in “48 hours”, but most of those since come off as fools who pearls have mistakenly been cast before them. Boomers pissing at WWII people is getting ever more pathetic Of course it is then still slower than the kid in a same price old Lancer Evolution which in my mind people in this mindset are welcome to.do whatever they want to.

        Reply
        • AvatarStephen

          It would be challenging to put 18’s on that car. I run 14’s on my car and it is getting very difficult to find new tires. Pretty much have to go mail order. I am running bigger tires on the rear so I can have a bit of rake. Never liked the ’60’s nose high look

          One of these days I will write up an article about my car

          –Stephen

          Reply
          • Tom KlockauTom Klockau Post author

            Mike’s car was finished this year, it has the same wheels, tires and Chrysler wheel covers now as it did before. It looks terrific. It’s not hot rodded. Not that I even need to defend how he spends his money or builds his car however he likes.

  4. Avatar-Nate

    What a great choice of vintage MoPar to keep on the road ! .

    Keep us posted, I wish I was closer to buy you a tank of fuel and a nice dinner far away so I could get a ride in it .

    -Nate

    Reply
  5. Avatar-Nate

    My, my ~ such vitriolic tirades about nothing .

    The person who foots the bill is the one who’s ideas count .

    Me, I like to drive, a _lot_ not just shredding tires ’round town and to the weekend show & shine so I prefer fairly low compression engines that are closely balanced and have CC’d combustion chambers, matched ports to exhaust manifolds and so on so there’s plenty of power for the steep hills and mountains if not tire burning thrust from a dead stop .

    To each their own, saying ‘your way is bad’ unless you’re lighting it on fire and destroying it, is silly .

    The fun thing is : in the drivers groups I run with there are always those who simply must have the biggest, loudest , tire shreddingest, best handling vehicles yet except in straight lines I’m usually far ahead of them .

    The only thing I think is foolish is making your ride so extreme you no longer enjoy driving it and this car appears to be well enjoyed by it’s owner so that’s moot .

    God knows it’s _beautiful_ to this old fart .

    Now, GET OFFA MY DAMN LAWN ! .

    -Nate

    Reply

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